Stability and Validity of an Automated Measure of Vocal Development From Day-Long Samples in Children With and Without Autism Spectrum Disorder

Authors

  • Paul J. Yoder,

    Corresponding author
    • Special Education Department, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
    Search for more papers by this author
  • D. Kimbrough Oller,

    1. School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee
    2. Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research, Altenberg, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jeffrey A. Richards,

    1. LENA Research Foundation, Boulder, Colorado
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Jeffrey A. Richards and Jill Gilkerson work for the LENA Research Foundation, the organization that owns the database of all-day recordings collected with the LENA Digital Language Processor. The content is the responsibility of all listed authors.
  • Sharmistha Gray,

    1. Boulder, Colorado
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jill Gilkerson

    1. LENA Research Foundation, Boulder, Colorado
    2. University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Jeffrey A. Richards and Jill Gilkerson work for the LENA Research Foundation, the organization that owns the database of all-day recordings collected with the LENA Digital Language Processor. The content is the responsibility of all listed authors.

Address for correspondence and reprints: Paul Yoder, 228 Peabody Box, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203. E-mail: paul.yoder@vanderbilt.edu

Abstract

Individual difference measures of vocal development may eventually aid our understanding of the variability in spoken language acquisition in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Large samples of child vocalizations may be needed to maximize the stability of vocal development estimates. Day-long vocal samples can now be automatically analyzed based on acoustic characteristics of speech likeness identified in theoretically driven and empirically cross-validated quantitative models of typical vocal development. This report indicates that a single day-long recording can produce a stable estimate for a measure of vocal development that is highly related to expressive spoken language in a group of young children with ASD and in a group that is typically developing. Autism Res 2013, 6: 103–107. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Ancillary