Association of paternal age with prevalence of selected birth defects

Authors

  • Natalie P. Archer,

    Corresponding author
    1. Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance Unit, Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 West 49th Street, Austin, Texas
    • Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance Unit, Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 West 49th St., Austin, TX 78756
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  • Peter H. Langlois,

    1. Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance Unit, Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 West 49th Street, Austin, Texas
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  • Lucina Suarez,

    1. Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance Unit, Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 West 49th Street, Austin, Texas
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  • Jean Brender,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Texas A&M School of Rural Public Health, 201 SRPH Administration Building, College Station, Texas
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  • Ram Shanmugam

    1. College of Health Professions, Texas State University, Health Science Center, Suite 201, 601 University Drive, San Marcos, Texas
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  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  • The contents of this work are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Birth Defects Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch of the Texas Department of State Health Services.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Unlike maternal age, the effect of paternal age on birth defect prevalence has not been well examined. We used cases from the Texas birth defect registry, born during 1996–2002, to evaluate the association of paternal age with the prevalence of selected structural birth defects. METHODS: Poisson regression was used to calculate prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with paternal age for each birth defect, adjusting for maternal age, race/ethnicity, and parity. RESULTS: Relative to fathers ages 25–29 years, fathers 20–24 years of age were more likely to have offspring with gastroschisis (PR 1.47, 95% CI: 1.12–1.94), and fathers 40+ years old were less likely to have offspring with trisomy 13 (PR 0.40, 95% CI: 0.16–0.96). No association was seen between paternal age and prevalence of anencephaly and encephalocele. A selection bias was observed for the other birth defects in which cases of younger fathers were more often excluded from study. CONCLUSIONS: In studies of birth defect risk and paternal age, the source of information may affect the validity of findings. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 2007. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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