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Karyotypic changes detected by comparative genomic hybridization in a stillborn infant with chorioangioma and liver hemangioma

Authors

  • Dimosthenis Miliaras,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Histology, Embryology & Anthropology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
    2. Department of Pathology, Euromedica Geniki Kliniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
    • Laboratory of Histology, Embryology & Anthropology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR54006 Thessaloniki, Greece
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  • Jeffrey Conroy,

    1. Microarray and Genomics Facility, Department of Cancer Genetics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York
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  • Stavroula Pervana,

    1. Department of Pathology, Euromedica Geniki Kliniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
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  • Soultana Meditskou,

    1. Laboratory of Histology, Embryology & Anthropology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
    2. Department of Pathology, Euromedica Geniki Kliniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
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  • Devin McQuaid,

    1. Microarray and Genomics Facility, Department of Cancer Genetics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York
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  • Norma Nowak

    1. Microarray and Genomics Facility, Department of Cancer Genetics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York
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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Placental hemangioma (chorioangioma) and congenital hemangioma are relatively common tumors, which on rare occasions may occur together. Very little is known about the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying these lesions.

CASE:

Herein we describe a rare case of a stillborn infant with chorioangioma, placental mesenchymal dysplasia, and liver cavernous hemangioma. In addition, we present the findings of the karyotype analysis of these lesions, which was done with the bacterial artificial chromosome arrays using the comparative genomic hybridization method. The chromosomal abnormalities that we found were deletions at 2q13 and 7p21.1 and were common to both placental and liver lesions.

CONCLUSIONS:

None of the identified chromosomal aberrations have been previously associated with chorioangiomas or hemangiomas. Important genes that lie in these DNA regions may be implicated in the pathogenesis of congenital hemangiomas and mesenchymal dysplasia. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 2007. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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