Descriptive epidemiologic features shared by birth defects thought to be related to vascular disruption in Texas, 1996–2002

Authors

  • Tasneem Husain,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, 1200 Herman Pressler, Houston, Texas 77054
    2. Birth Defects Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 W. 49th Street, Austin, Texas 78756
    • Birth Defects Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 W. 49th St., Austin, TX 78756
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Peter H. Langlois,

    1. Birth Defects Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 W. 49th Street, Austin, Texas 78756
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lowell E. Sever,

    1. Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation, 1100 Dexter Avenue North-Suite 400, Seattle, Washington 98109
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Michael J. Gambello

    1. Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Medical School, 6431 Fannin, Houston, Texas 77030
    Search for more papers by this author

  • A poster was presented at the Women's Health Network Conference in Houston, May 2007.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:In utero vascular disruptions are thought to be associated with a variety of birth defects. This study examined the descriptive epidemiology of several of those defects using data from a large birth defects registry. METHODS: Data on birth defects ascertained from pregnancies in 1996–2002 were obtained from the Texas Birth Defects Registry. Using Poisson regression, we calculated crude and adjusted associations between maternal and infant characteristics and birth defects thought to be related to vascular disruption. We repeated the analysis using isolated cases and cases occurring in mothers <20 years. RESULTS: The most commonly shared pattern was observed for plurality and five defects: large intestinal atresia (PR 3.67; CI: 1.63–7.13), renal agenesis (PR 2.05; CI: 1.55–2.65), transverse limb deficiency (PR 1.85; CI: 1.28–2.57), porencephaly (PR 5.18; CI: 2.40–9.87), and Goldenhar syndrome (PR 3.45; CI: 1.04–8.53). Hispanics had the highest prevalence of gastroschisis (PR 1.21; CI: 1.05–1.40), transverse limb deficiency (PR 1.19; CI: 1.01–1.40), microtia/anotia (PR 2.22; CI: 1.83–2.70), and Poland anomaly (PR 1.90; CI: 1.26–2.93). Male infants were at greatest risk for renal agenesis (PR 1.58; CI: 1.40–1.80), porencephaly (PR 1.66; CI: 1.03–2.72), and Poland anomaly (PR 1.52; CI: 1.05–2.21). CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirmed findings in previous studies, but also uncovered several new associations. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2008. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary