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Neural tube defects and maternal intake of micronutrients related to one-carbon metabolism or antioxidant activity

Authors

  • Angela L. Chandler,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, Arkansas
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  • Charlotte A. Hobbs,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, Arkansas
    • Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, 13 Children's Way, Slot 512-40, Little Rock, AR 72202
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  • Bridget S. Mosley,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, Arkansas
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  • Robert J. Berry,

    1. Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Mark A. Canfield,

    1. Birth Defects Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
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  • Yan Ping Qi,

    1. Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Anna Maria Siega-Riz,

    1. Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition, University of North Carolina School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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  • Gary M. Shaw,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California
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  • National Birth Defects Prevention Study


  • This research was supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (5U01DD000491); and partially supported by the National Institutes of Health (RO1NS050249 to G.M.S.). Funds for part of the nutrient database work were provided by NIH DK56350 granted to the University of North Carolina Department of Nutrition Clinical Research Center, Nutrition Epidemiology Core.

  • The manuscript's contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the California Department of Public Health. All authors have stated that they have no conflict of interest regarding this manuscript.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Maternal nutritional status has been evaluated to clarify its role in development of neural tube defects (NTDs). Maternal folate intake during pregnancy has been closely evaluated for its association with NTDs. The study objective was to examine associations between NTDs and other dietary periconceptional micronutrient intake, particularly nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism or antioxidant activity.

METHODS

Using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1997–2005, logistic regression models were used to estimate the relative risk of NTDs based on maternal micronutrient intake.

RESULTS

Results were stratified according to folic acid supplement use, race/ethnicity, and maternal body mass index. Analyses included 954 cases (300 with anencephaly, 654 with spina bifida) and 6268 controls. Higher intakes of folate, thiamin, betaine, iron, and vitamin A were associated with decreased risk of anencephaly among some ethnic and clinical groups. In some groups, higher intakes of thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, niacin, and retinol were associated with decreased risk of spina bifida.

CONCLUSION

In addition to folic acid, other micronutrients, including thiamin, betaine, riboflavin, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, niacin, iron, retinol, and vitamin A, may decrease the risk of NTD occurrence. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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