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“Natural” progesterone: information on fetal effects

Authors

  • Mari S. Golub,

    Corresponding author
    1. Reproductive and Cancer Hazard Assessment Branch, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento, California
    • OEHHA, P.O. Box 4010, Sacramento, CA 95812
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  • Farla L. Kaufman,

    1. Reproductive and Cancer Hazard Assessment Branch, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento, California
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  • Marlissa A. Campbell,

    1. Reproductive and Cancer Hazard Assessment Branch, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento, California
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  • Ling-Hong Li,

    1. Reproductive and Cancer Hazard Assessment Branch, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento, California
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  • James M. Donald

    1. Reproductive and Cancer Hazard Assessment Branch, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento, California
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  • This review was based on the document “Evidence on the Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity of Progesterone” prepared for OEHHA's Science Advisory Board in August 2004.

  • Disclaimer: Opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not represent those of the California Environmental Protection Agency.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A variety of progestational agents have been used therapeutically and evaluated for adverse effects over the last 50 years. However, progesterone itself has come into use as a therapeutic agent only recently with the development of an orally bioavailable “micronized” preparation. METHODS: The current review examines progesterone adverse effects as identified in the larger literature on the toxicity of progestational agents and pharmacokinetics. RESULTS: Progesterone has cytoplasmic and membrane receptors in a variety of reproductive and nonreproductive tissues including the brain and is a potent inhibitor of GnRH. Limited information is available on progesterone receptors and actions in the fetus. Concern about exogenous progestagen effects on fetal reproductive tract development have led to considerable human research over the years, but this literature review demonstrates that contemporary developmental toxicology research on progesterone is lacking. CONCLUSIONS: Progesterone is a potent, multi-faceted endocrine agent with an expanding therapeutic profile and a minimal scientific database for evaluating safe use during pregnancy. Birth Defects Res (Part B) 77:455–470, 2006. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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