Atrazine and reproductive function: mode and mechanism of action studies

Authors

  • Ralph L. Cooper,

    Corresponding author
    1. Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina
    • MD-72, Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711
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  • Susan C. Laws,

    1. Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina
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  • Parikshit C. Das,

    1. Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh
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  • Michael G. Narotsky,

    1. Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina
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  • Jerome M. Goldman,

    1. Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina
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  • E. Lee Tyrey,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Reproductive Biology Division, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
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  • Tammy E. Stoker

    1. Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina
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  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  • The work described here and this document have been reviewed in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Approval does not signify that the contents reflect the views of the Agency, nor does mention of traded names or commercial products constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

Abstract

Atrazine, a chlorotriazine herbicide, is used to control annual grasses and broadleaf weeds. In this review, we summarize our laboratory's work evaluating the neuroendocrine toxicity of atrazine (and related chlorotriazines) from an historic perspective. We provide the rationale for our work as we have endeavored to determine: 1) the underlying reproductive changes leading to the development of mammary gland tumors in the atrazine-exposed female rat; 2) the cascade of physiological events that are responsible for these changes (i.e., the mode of action for mammary tumors); 3) the potential cellular mechanisms involving adverse effects of atrazine; and 4) the range of reproductive alterations associated with this pesticide. Birth Defects Res (Part B), 2007. Published 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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