Microcomputed tomography imaging of skeletal development and growth

Authors

  • Robert E. Guldberg,

    Corresponding author
    1. Schools of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering and the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
    • School of Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, 315 Ferst Drive, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Angela S.P. Lin,

    1. Schools of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering and the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Rhima Coleman,

    1. Schools of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering and the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Galen Robertson,

    1. Schools of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering and the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Craig Duvall

    1. Schools of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering and the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Skeletogenesis is an exquisitely orchestrated and dynamic process, culminating in the formation of highly variable and complex mineralized structures that are optimized for their function. While cellular and molecular biology studies have provided tremendous recent progress toward understanding how patterns of bone formation are regulated, high resolution imaging techniques such as microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) can provide complementary quantitative information about the progressive changes in three-dimensional (3-D) skeletal morphology and density that occur during early skeletal development and postnatal growth. Furthermore, recently developed in vivo micro-CT systems promise to be a powerful and efficient tool for noninvasively monitoring normal skeletogenesis, as well as for evaluating the effects of genetic or environmental manipulation. This review focuses on the use of micro-CT imaging and analysis to better understand normal and abnormal skeletal development and growth. Birth Defects Research (Part C) 72: 250–259, 2004. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary