Get access

DNA methylation of cancer genome

Authors

  • Hoi-Hung Cheung,

    Corresponding author
    1. Section on Developmental Genomics, Laboratory of Clinical Genomics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong SAR, China
    • School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR, China
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The first two authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Tin-Lap Lee,

    1. Section on Developmental Genomics, Laboratory of Clinical Genomics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
    Search for more papers by this author
    • The first two authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Owen M. Rennert,

    1. Section on Developmental Genomics, Laboratory of Clinical Genomics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Wai-Yee Chan

    Corresponding author
    1. Section on Developmental Genomics, Laboratory of Clinical Genomics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong SAR, China
    • School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR, China
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

Abstract

DNA methylation plays an important role in regulating normal development and carcinogenesis. Current understanding of the biological roles of DNA methylation is limited to its role in the regulation of gene transcription, genomic imprinting, genomic stability, and X chromosome inactivation. In the past 2 decades, a large number of changes have been identified in cancer epigenomes when compared with normals. These alterations fall into two main categories, namely, hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes and hypomethylation of oncogenes or heterochromatin, respectively. Aberrant methylation of genes controlling the cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, drug resistance, and intracellular signaling has been identified in multiple cancer types. Recent advancements in whole-genome analysis of methylome have yielded numerous differentially methylated regions, the functions of which are largely unknown. With the development of high resolution tiling microarrays and high throughput DNA sequencing, more cancer methylomes will be profiled, facilitating the identification of new candidate genes or ncRNAs that are related to oncogenesis, new prognostic markers, and the discovery of new target genes for cancer therapy. Birth Defects Research (Part C) 87:335–350, 2009. Published 2009 by Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary