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Keywords:

  • cellular phone;
  • testes;
  • p53;
  • lipid composition;
  • malondialdehyde;
  • spermatocyte

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of radiofrequency radiation emitted from cellular phones on the lipid composition, malondialdehyde concentration, p53 immune reactivity, sperm count, morphology, histological structure of testes, and on rectal temperature of rats exposed to microwave radiation emitted from cellular phones. Sixteen Spraque–Dawley rats were separated into two groups of eight, sham exposed (control) and experimental. The rats were confined in plexiglas cages specially designed for this study, and cellular phones were placed 0.5 cm under the cages. For the experimental group, cellular phones were activated 20 min per day (7 days a week) for 1 month. For the control group, the cellular phones were placed beneath the cages for 20 min a day, but the phones were turned off. Rectal temperatures were measured weekly. For 250 mW radiated power, the whole body average SAR (rms) is 0.52 W/kg and 1 g averaged peak SAR (rms) is 3.13 W/kg. The Mann–Whitney U-test was used for statistical comparisons of groups. No statistically significant alteration in any of the endpoints was noted. This study found no evidence suggesting an adverse effect of cell phone exposure on measures of testicular function or structure. Bioelectromagnetics 24:182–188, 2003. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.