cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and the dynamics of epithelial cell surface domains: Moving membranes to keep in shape

Authors

  • Kacper A. Wojtal,

    1. Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
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  • Dick Hoekstra,

    1. Department of Cell Biology/Membrane Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
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  • Sven C.D. van IJzendoorn

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Cell Biology/Membrane Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
    • Department of Cell Biology/Membrane Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands.
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Abstract

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) are evolutionary conserved molecules with a well-established position in the complex network of signal transduction pathways. cAMP/PKA-mediated signaling pathways are implicated in many biological processes that cooperate in organ development including the motility, survival, proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells. Cell surface polarity, here defined as the anisotropic organisation of cellular membranes, is a critical parameter for most of these processes. Changes in the activity of cAMP/PKA elicit a variety of effects on intracellular membrane dynamics, including membrane sorting and trafficking. One of the most intriguing aspects of cAMP/PKA signaling is its evolutionary conserved abundance on the one hand and its precise spatial–temporal actions on the other. Here, we review recent developments with regard to the role of cAMP/PKA in the regulation of intracellular membrane trafficking in relation to the dynamics of epithelial surface domains. BioEssays 30:146–155, 2008. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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