BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 33 Issue 12

December 2011

Volume 33, Issue 12

Pages 193–968

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Reports & Opinion
    9. Acknowledgements
    10. Biotec Visions
    11. Next Issue
    1. BioEssays 12/2011

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190067

      Invertebrate models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). On pages 956-965 Stuart Grice et al. highlight insights made into SMA using Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. With their tractable nervous systems, genetic amenability, and large reproductive capacities, the invertebrate models have provided a valuable contribution to understanding the cellular function of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, to unravelling the underlying genetic pathways pertinent to SMA, and to identifying potential therapeutics. The cover image shows a Drosophila larval brain lobe stained for SMN (green) with enrichments in the post embryonic neuroblasts (red; top left), a Drosophila larva expressing red fl uorescent protein in the nervous system (middle), and an adult C. elegans smn-1 point mutant expressing green fl uorescent protein within the nervous system (bottom right).

      Cover by S. J. Grice and J. N. Sleigh

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Reports & Opinion
    9. Acknowledgements
    10. Biotec Visions
    11. Next Issue
    1. BioEssays 12/2011

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190069

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Hox gene fushi tarazu (ftz) functions as a pair-rule segmentation gene in Drosophila. In contrast, Ftz protein from a beetle (Tc-Ftz) retains homeotic potential, indicated by its ability to transform antenna (upper left) to leg (lower right) and to repress Homothorax expression (red) when expressed in Drosophila, observed as loss of overlap between GFP, which marks Tc-Ftz expression, and Homothorax expression (upper right). Heffer et al. review the evidence that ftz evolved from a traditional Hox gene with homeotic potential to a gene with exclusive pair-rule segmentation function in Drosophila. The authors correlate Ftz functional evolution with the presence and absence of distinct co-factor interaction domains, necessary for either homeotic or segmentation function.

      Backcover by A. Heffer, U. Löhr and L. Pick

  3. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Reports & Opinion
    9. Acknowledgements
    10. Biotec Visions
    11. Next Issue
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    2. You have free access to this content
  4. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Reports & Opinion
    9. Acknowledgements
    10. Biotec Visions
    11. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 12/2011 (pages 896–897)

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190065

  5. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Reports & Opinion
    9. Acknowledgements
    10. Biotec Visions
    11. Next Issue
    1. Idea to watch

    2. Ex laboratorio

      You have free access to this content
    3. Hypotheses

    4. Think again

      ftz Evolution: Findings, hypotheses and speculations (response to DOI 10.1002/bies.201100019) (pages 910–918)

      Alison Heffer, Ulrike Löhr and Leslie Pick

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100112

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Ftz protein sequence changed over evolution, changing its function from homeotic to segmentation.

    5. Commentary

  6. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Reports & Opinion
    9. Acknowledgements
    10. Biotec Visions
    11. Next Issue
    1. Review essays

      Unusual modes of reproduction in social insects: Shedding light on the evolutionary paradox of sex (pages 927–937)

      Tom Wenseleers and Annette Van Oystaeyen

      Version of Record online: 14 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100096

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Studying the mixed mode of reproduction (sexual/asexual) in social insects such as ants and termites may provide insights into many basic evolutionary questions including the maintenance of sex, the expression of sexual conflict and kin conflict, and the evolution of cheating in asexual lineages.

    2. Genome analyses substantiate male mutation bias in many species (pages 938–945)

      Melissa A. Wilson Sayres and Kateryna D. Makova

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In many species the mutation rate is higher in males that in females. The availability of whole genome sequences allows us to study factors — both sequence-specific and those acting on the genome globally — that affect these differences in mutation rates between males and females.

    3. Methods, Models & Techniques

      Light it up: Highly efficient multigene delivery in mammalian cells (pages 946–955)

      Simon Trowitzsch, Martin Klumpp, Ralf Thoma, Jean-Philippe Carralot and Imre Berger

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100109

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
    4. Invertebrate models of spinal muscular atrophy: Insights into mechanisms and potential therapeutics (pages 956–965)

      Stuart J. Grice, James N. Sleigh, Ji-Long Liu and David B. Sattelle

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100082

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans can be used as convenient model organisms to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the function of the SMN gene.

  7. Reports & Opinion

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Reports & Opinion
    9. Acknowledgements
    10. Biotec Visions
    11. Next Issue
    1. Book reviews

  8. Acknowledgements

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Reports & Opinion
    9. Acknowledgements
    10. Biotec Visions
    11. Next Issue
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  9. Biotec Visions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Reports & Opinion
    9. Acknowledgements
    10. Biotec Visions
    11. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2011, November (pages A1-A8)

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190068

  10. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Reports & Opinion
    9. Acknowledgements
    10. Biotec Visions
    11. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190070

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