BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 33 Issue 4

April 2011

Volume 33, Issue 4

Pages 237–311

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Biotec Visions
    8. Next Issue
    1. BioEssays 4/2011

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190013

      Cover Photograph: Snake venom: An underestimated resource for drug development. Despite being used for medicinal purposes since the ancient times, the full potential of snake venoms in pharmacology is still being grossly underestimated according to Vonk et al. on pages 269–279 of this issue. The authors review recent discoveries in venom composition and toxin diversity and elaborate how these advances might be exploited for drug development with the help of innovative high-throughput techniques. Toxin diversity of snake venoms has arisen in evolution via several mechanisms, such as multiple splicing, post-translational modification and domain switching. At the same time a global biodiversity crisis is threatening the snake populations on which hopes for new medications depend. The photo shows Coelognathus radiata, a mildly venomous snake inhabiting Asian rainforests.

      Cover by F. Vonk

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Biotec Visions
    8. Next Issue
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  3. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Biotec Visions
    8. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 4/2011 (pages 238–239)

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190012

  4. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Biotec Visions
    8. Next Issue
    1. Ex laboratorio

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    3. Hypotheses

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The proportional lack of archaeal pathogens: Do viruses/phages hold the key? (pages 248–254)

      Erin E. Gill and Fiona S. L. Brinkman

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201000091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The proportional lack of archaeal pathogens might be due to mutually exclusive populations of phages and viruses that infect Bacteria and Archaea respectively (because of the different properties of their respective cell walls), coupled with the association of bacterial virulence with phage/mobile elements.

  5. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Biotec Visions
    8. Next Issue
    1. Recently in press

    2. Review essays

      How will fish that evolved at constant sub-zero temperatures cope with global warming? Notothenioids as a case study (pages 260–268)

      Tomaso Patarnello, Cinzia Verde, Guido di Prisco, Luca Bargelloni and Lorenzo Zane

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201000124

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antarctic fish have evolved unique adaptations to the cold at morphological, physiological and biochemical levels. These phenotypic modifications are often accompanied by ‘irreversible’ genomic losses. Notothenioids manifest a reduction of natural genetic variation that may reduce their ability to survive in changing environments.

    3. Of circles, forks and humanity: Topological organisation and replication of mammalian mitochondrial DNA (pages 290–299)

      Jaakko L. O. Pohjoismäki and Steffi Goffart

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201000137

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      As the organisation of mitochondrial DNA is rather complex (ranging from supercoiled monomeric circles to catenanes and multimeric networks) it is not surprising that there are at least two different mechanisms of replication: a unidirectional, strand-asynchronous mode (RITOLS=RNA intermediates throughout the lagging strand) and a bi-directional strand-coupled mode (COSCOFA=conventional strand-coupled Okazaki-fragment associating).

  6. Biotec Visions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Biotec Visions
    8. Next Issue
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      Biotec Visions: BioEssays 4/2011

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190014

  7. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Biotec Visions
    8. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190015

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