BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 33 Issue 5

May 2011

Volume 33, Issue 5

Pages 313–395

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Biotec Visions
    9. Next Issue
    10. Back Cover
    1. BioEssays 5/2011

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190019

      Cover Photograph: Counterpoints in cancer. The somatic mutation theory (SMT, depicted on the right hand side) has long been the accepted model of carcinogenesis. In this model a cell gradually accumulates mutations in genes critical for cell cycle control and apoptosis, for example, which ultimately turn the cell cancerous. This theory is challenged by an alternative model: the tissue organisation fi eld theory (TOFT, represented on the left hand side) posits that cancer is, instead, a tissue-based disease. This issue of BioEssays features these two radically different stances in a point [LEFT RIGHT ARROW] counterpoint, attacking and defending the SMT (see pages 332–343).

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Biotec Visions
    9. Next Issue
    10. Back Cover
    1. You have free access to this content
      Counterpoints in cancer: The somatic mutation theory under attack (pages 313–314)

      David Thomas and Andrew Moore

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190016

  3. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Biotec Visions
    9. Next Issue
    10. Back Cover
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 5/2011 (pages 316–317)

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190017

  4. Highlights from other journals

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Biotec Visions
    9. Next Issue
    10. Back Cover
    1. You have free access to this content
      Highlights from other journals (page 318)

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190018

  5. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Biotec Visions
    9. Next Issue
    10. Back Cover
    1. Hypotheses

      Why does the brain (not) have glycogen? (pages 319–326)

      Mauro DiNuzzo, Bruno Maraviglia and Federico Giove

      Version of Record online: 21 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201000151

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Brain glycogen is a critical determinant in the modulation of carbohydrate supply at the cellular level. Increased neuronal firing might stimulate K+ induced, AMP-mediated glycogen mobilisation in astrocytes and production of hexose phosphates. These compounds, in turn, suppress hexokinase activity and thus reduce glucose uptake by astrocytes which saves extracellular blood-borne glucose for neuronal utilisation.

    2. Ideas & Speculations

    3. Think again

      The tissue organization field theory of cancer: A testable replacement for the somatic mutation theory (pages 332–340)

      Ana M. Soto and Carlos Sonnenschein

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Until now the somatic mutation theory of cancer has been the prevalent theory attempting to explain how neoplasms arise and progress. Nevertheless, considering cancer as a clonal, cell-based disease is unable to explain all phenomena observed in carcinogenesis. It might therefore be time to look at cancer as a tissue-based disease, which is what the tissue organisation field theory does.

    4. Commentary

  6. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Biotec Visions
    9. Next Issue
    10. Back Cover
    1. Recently in press

      Epigenetics and the brain: Transcriptome sequencing reveals new depths to genomic imprinting (pages 362–367)

      Gavin Kelsey

      Version of Record online: 21 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100004

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The recent discovery of more than a thousand potentially imprinted genes in the mouse brain may help to elucidate epigenetic regulation of brain function and behaviour.

    2. Review essays

  7. Biotec Visions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Biotec Visions
    9. Next Issue
    10. Back Cover
    1. You have free access to this content
      Biotec Visions: BioEssays 5/2011

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190020

  8. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Biotec Visions
    9. Next Issue
    10. Back Cover
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190021

  9. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Biotec Visions
    9. Next Issue
    10. Back Cover
    1. BioEssays 5/2011

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190022

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