BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 33 Issue 8

August 2011

Volume 33, Issue 8

Pages 559–647

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Idea to watch
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Expression of concern
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. BioEssays 8/2011

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190039

      Cover Photograph Connecting the gut microbiota with brain development. On pages 588–591, Betty Diamond et al. discuss recent evidence that shows that the gut microbiota is not only critical for intestinal function and activation of systemic immunity but that it also plays a role in brain development. The bacterial content of the gut, which changes rapidly after birth as food ingestion begins, exerts a strong influence over brain development most likely via immune signalling. Notably there is only a certain time frame during which the gut flora can influence the developing brain. In the absence of intestinal microbiota, histopathological and behavioural abnormalities arise. The interconnection between the gut microbiota and the brain may also open up new frontiers for research and new therapeutic strategies for neurodevelopmental diseases.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Idea to watch
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Expression of concern
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Idea to watch
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Expression of concern
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 8/2011 (pages 560–561)

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190037

  4. Idea to watch

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Idea to watch
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Expression of concern
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Neuroactive probiotics (page 562)

      Gregor Reid

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100074

  5. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Idea to watch
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Expression of concern
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Hypotheses

    2. Probiotics function mechanistically as delivery vehicles for neuroactive compounds: Microbial endocrinology in the design and use of probiotics (pages 574–581)

      Mark Lyte

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100024

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Probiotics are capable of producing neurochemicals such as acetylcholine or dopamine that may influence a human's gastrointestinal and psychological health by binding to receptors on immune and neuronal cells.

    3. Ideas & Speculations

  6. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Idea to watch
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Expression of concern
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Recently in press

    2. Review essays

    3. Problems & Paradigms

      Are viruses a source of new protein folds for organisms? – Virosphere structure space and evolution (pages 626–635)

      Aare Abroi and Julian Gough

      Version of Record online: 1 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201000126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A significant number of domain superfamilies in viruses do not have any structural and evolutionary relative in modern cellular organisms. These superfamilies could be a source of novel protein folds not only for viruses but also for cellular organisms via horizontal transfer.

  7. Expression of concern

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Idea to watch
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Expression of concern
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      Expression of concern (page 647)

      Silvia Bulfone-Paus, Elena Bulanova, Vadim Budagian and Ralf Paus

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190038

      This article corrects:

      The interleukin-15/interleukin-15 receptor system as a model for juxtacrine and reverse signaling

      Vol. 28, Issue 4, 362–377, Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2006

  8. Biotec Visions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Idea to watch
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Expression of concern
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2011, July (pages A1-A8)

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190040

  9. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Idea to watch
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Expression of concern
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190041

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