BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 33 Issue 9

September 2011

Volume 33, Issue 9

Pages 649–719

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. BioEssays 9/2011

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190046

      Thermogenesis, muscle hyperplasia, and the origin of birds. The origin of birds from their reptilian ancestors has been classically considered to be driven by the evolution of flight. In this issue (pages 653–656) Stuart Newman presents a new theory of bird origins that emphasizes instead the adaptive role of enlarged skeletal muscles. The common ancestor of birds and lizards lost the vertebrate gene for uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) the product of which is essential for the generation of heat by brown fat, a tissue that protects newborns of mammals from hypothermia. This created an imperative for the direct ancestors of birds (but not “cold-blooded” lizards) to increase the mass of skeletal muscle, the main source of body heat in modern birds and their young. Evolutionary expansion of the thigh muscles led as a side-effect to bipedality. This in turn provided the opportunity for expansion of the breast muscles and freed up the forelimbs for other adaptive changes, such as flying or swimming.

      Cover by S. Newman and S. Seif

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
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  3. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 9/2011 (pages 650–651)

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190043

  4. Highlights from other journals

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      Highlights from other journals (page 652)

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190044

  5. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Ideas & Speculations

      Thermogenesis, muscle hyperplasia, and the origin of birds (pages 653–656)

      Stuart A. Newman

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100061

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It is classically believed that the origin of birds was driven by the evolution of flight. However, the enlargement of skeletal muscles (especially the thigh muscles) may have led to bipedality, freeing up the forelimbs for other adaptive changes like flying or swimming.

    2. Commentary

  6. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Recently in press

      Is there a genomically imprinted social brain? (pages 662–668)

      James P. Curley

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100060

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A recent mouse study revealed that the imprinted gene Grb10 governs unique aspects of mouse social behaviour.

    2. Improving cardiac regeneration after injury: Are we a step closer? (pages 669–673)

      Susanne J. Kühl and Michael Kühl

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100046

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It is a well-accepted dogma that the mammalian heart cannot efficiently regenerate after injury. Novel data now indicate that the young murine heart does have the ability to regenerate providing a good starting point to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon.

    3. Review essays

    4. Into the deep: New discoveries at the base of the green plant phylogeny (pages 683–692)

      Frederik Leliaert, Heroen Verbruggen and Frederick W. Zechman

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100035

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The discovery of an ancient group of deep-water seaweeds challenges the current understanding of the basal branches of the green plant phylogeny.

    5. The secreted kinase ROP18 defends Toxoplasma's border (pages 693–700)

      Sarah J. Fentress and L. David Sibley

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100054

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
    6. Methods, Models & Techniques

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Rapid validation of cancer genes in chimeras derived from established genetically engineered mouse models (pages 701–710)

      Ivo J. Huijbers, Paul Krimpenfort, Anton Berns and Jos Jonkers

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100018

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
    7. Empowering plant evo-devo: Virus induced gene silencing validates new and emerging model systems (pages 711–718)

      Verónica S. Di Stilio

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100040

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Virus Induced Gene Silencing is a useful tool allowing functional studies in a wide variety of plant lineages and thus enlarging the number of potential model organisms which may help to understand the evolution of biodiversity.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Empowering plant evo-devo: Virus induced gene silencing validates new and emerging model systems

      Vol. 33, Issue 10, 783, Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2011

  7. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      Thermogenesis, muscle hyperplasia, and the origin of birds (page 719)

      S. Newman

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190045

      This article corrects:

      Thermogenesis, muscle hyperplasia, and the origin of birds

      Vol. 33, Issue 9, 653–656, Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2011

  8. Biotec Visions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2011, August (pages A1-A8)

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190047

  9. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Highlights from other journals
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Corrigendum
    9. Biotec Visions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201190048

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