BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 12

December 2012

Volume 34, Issue 12

Pages 1003–1086

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Acknowledgements
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 12/2012

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290059

      Defining protein domains. On pages 1060–1069 of this issue, Clare-Louise Towse and Valerie Daggett discuss the importance of filtering structural protein databases. They present their findings from the Dynameomics initiative that aimed at simulating and cataloguing the dynamics of representatives of all known protein folds. A crucial step of this project was to collate all identified structural domains from various databases and to ensure a consistent definition for the domains. Furthermore, they revisit rejected metafolds to recategorize them. Approximately one third of these rejected metafolds contain putative disordered regions and at least some of them may fall into the category of intrinsically disordered proteins.

  2. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Acknowledgements
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      Men in science (page 1003)

      Andrew Moore

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290055

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  3. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Acknowledgements
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 12/2012 (pages 1006–1007)

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290057

  4. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Acknowledgements
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Idea to watch

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    2. Hypotheses

      Brain estrogen signaling effects acute modulation of acoustic communication behaviors: A working hypothesis (pages 1009–1016)

      Luke Remage-Healey

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This article presents a hypothesis regarding the role of estrogen synthesis in neural circuits for acoustic communication. Traditionally considered reproductive hormones, recent findings indicate that estrogens can have acute and highly localized actions in brain circuits. This modulation enables fast changes in acoustic communication behaviors in many vertebrates, including songbirds.

    3. Ideas & Speculations

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      The metastatic cancer cell cortex: An adaptation to enhance robust cell division in novel environments? (pages 1017–1020)

      Helen K. Matthews and Buzz Baum

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200109

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      To metastasize, cancer cells must be able to complete cell division in environments very different from their tissue of origin. We suggest that mitotic cell rounding, aided by several actin-regulatory oncogenes, may facilitate this process in a robust, context-independent manner.

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      Evidence for a cell cycle checkpoint that senses branched actin in the lamellipodium (pages 1021–1024)

      Irene Dang and Alexis Gautreau

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200119

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent evidence indicates that branched actin might control cell progression through G1 in addition to lamellipodium protrusion.

    5. Think again

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      Introns in UTRs: Why we should stop ignoring them (pages 1025–1034)

      Alicia A. Bicknell, Can Cenik, Hon N. Chua, Frederick P. Roth and Melissa J. Moore

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200073

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Whereas introns in coding regions are well-appreciated for their role in producing alternative protein isoforms, introns in untranslated regions (UTRs) have been largely ignored. Recent evidence shows that UTR introns are important for regulating gene expression; introns in 5′-UTRs control mRNA nuclear export, and introns in 3′-UTRs regulate mRNA stability.

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      Sequencing of rhesus macaque Y chromosome clarifies origins and evolution of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) genes (pages 1035–1044)

      Jennifer F. Hughes, Helen Skaletsky and David C. Page

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200066

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The DAZ genes, which are critical to spermatogenesis, are the sole survivors of a massive autosomal transposition to the primate Y chromosome. We reconstruct the evolutionary history of DAZ over 25 million years through a comparison of the complete Y chromosome sequences of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque.

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      Optimizing α for better statistical decisions: A case study involving the pace-of-life syndrome hypothesis : Optimal α levels set to minimize Type I and II errors frequently result in different conclusions from those using α = 0.05 (pages 1045–1049)

      Joseph F. Mudge, Faith M. Penny and Jeff E. Houlahan

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200120

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      Reliance on the arbitrary α = 0.05 for null hypothesis significance tests causes interpretation problems in biological research. Significance levels can instead be set to minimize either the combined probabilities or the costs of Type I and Type II errors at biologically relevant effect sizes. Setting optimal α levels improves scientific decision-making.

  5. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Acknowledgements
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Review essays

      Sex influences immune responses to viruses, and efficacy of prophylaxis and treatments for viral diseases (pages 1050–1059)

      Sabra L. Klein

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200099

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Females mount higher immune responses to viral infections than males, which can result in faster clearance of viruses, but also contributes to increased development of immunopathology. Responses to and the outcome of vaccination and antiviral drug treatments for viral diseases also differ between the sexes.

    2. Problems & Paradigms

      When a domain is not a domain, and why it is important to properly filter proteins in databases : Conflicting definitions and fold classification systems for structural domains make filtering of such databases imperative (pages 1060–1069)

      Clare-Louise Towse and Valerie Daggett

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Qualification of protein domains by topology is a complex and imperfect science and consolidating “known” protein fold space is hindered by domain definition ambiguity. Hence, filtration of structural databases is necessary, more so as increasing numbers of “non-traditional” structures, driven by interest in intrinsically disordered proteins, are deposited.

    3. Looping in on Ndc80 – How does a protein loop at the kinetochore control chromosome segregation? (pages 1070–1077)

      Jakob Nilsson

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200096

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The proper segregation of chromosomes requires a stable yet dynamic binding between kinetochores and microtubules of the mitotic spindle. The kinetochore localized four-subunit Ndc80 complex plays a crucial role in establishing this link. Here I discuss our recent advance in understanding Ndc80 function and in particular an internal loop region.

    4. How did bacterial ancestors reproduce? Lessons from L-form cells and giant lipid vesicles : Multiplication similarities between lipid vesicles and L-form bacteria (pages 1078–1084)

      Yves Briers, Peter Walde, Markus Schuppler and Martin J. Loessner

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200080

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      When studying primitive or primordial cell division mechanisms, a top-down approach (analysis of cell wall-deficient bacteria or L-forms) and a bottom-up approach (using giant vesicles or experimental protocells) meet each other at the morphological level. The striking similarities provide insights into the possible origin and evolution of cell reproduction mechanisms.

  6. Reports & Opinion

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Acknowledgements
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Correspondence

  7. Acknowledgements

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Acknowledgements
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
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      A word of heartfelt thanks to our reviewers (page 1086)

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290058

  8. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Acknowledgements
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2012, November (pages A1-A8)

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290060

  9. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorials
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Acknowledgements
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290061

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