BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 3

March 2012

Volume 34, Issue 3

Pages 163–251

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Meetings
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 3/2012

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290007

      Molecular bioelectricity in developmental biology: New tools and recent discoveries. The cover image shows a section taken through a whole eye, formed outside of the head in a Xenopus embryo by targeted manipulation of transmembrane potential in key cells. The section stains with eye cell-specific markers such as cones (yellow), Mü ller glia (red/magenta), and amacrine cells (cyan), showing that bioelectric signals can drive cells to form complex organs with appropriate internal structure. On pages 205–217, Michael Levin reviews the state of the art in the interdisciplinary fi eld of molecular bioelectricity, and highlights recent advances in the molecular mechanisms by which voltage gradients regulate biological growth and form. The development of molecular-genetic tools for probing these biophysical signals has led to exciting discoveries of new roles for bioelectricity in morphogenesis during embryogenesis, regeneration, and cancer suppression. Endogenous voltage gradients within tissues provide instructive cues for anatomical polarity, organ identity, and positional information.

      Cover by Vaibhav Pai

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Meetings
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. BioEssays 3/2012

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290010

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Eye genes expressed on wings. This image shows ommatidia containing red-reflecting screening pigments (photo courtesy of Doekela Stavenga) deployed on the wings of an Heliconius butterfly (photo courtesy of Chris Jiggins). On pages 181–186 of this issue Antónia Monteiro reviews recent discoveries that suggest that eye-like organs on the wings of Eohelea midges, and red patches on the wings of Heliconus butterflies, may have originated from redeployments of the eye gene regulatory network on the wings of these insects. Monteiro also develops an empirical framework to help recognize when such co-option events underlie the origin of novel traits. The doctored image conveys the concept of ectopic expression in the creation of novel traits.

      Backcover by A. Monteiro

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Meetings
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
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  4. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Meetings
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 3/2012 (pages 164–165)

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290006

  5. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Meetings
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Ideas & Speculations

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      Does the speciation clock tick more slowly in the absence of heteromorphic sex chromosomes? (pages 166–169)

      Barret C. Phillips and Suzanne Edmands

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100164

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Squamates may be an attractive group in which to study the influence of sex chromosomes on speciation rates because of the repeated evolution of heterogamety (both XY and ZW), as well as an apparently large number of taxa with environmental sex-determination.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Stochastic gene expression stabilization as a new therapeutic strategy for cancer (pages 170–173)

      Jean-Pascal Capp

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100149

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Current differentiation therapies for cancer may not be effective because it might not be enough to only use molecules targeting chromatin remodelers. It may also be necessary to stabilize the re-expressed genes to convert malignant cells into benign ones.

  6. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Meetings
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Recently in press

    2. Review essays

    3. Factor mediated gene priming in pluripotent stem cells sets the stage for lineage specification (pages 194–204)

      Niall Dillon

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100137

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polycomb proteins seem to help maintain silencing in pluripotent stem cells while establishing a chromatin environment that is permissive for priming by sequence-specific factors.

    4. Purinergic signalling: Its unpopular beginning, its acceptance and its exciting future (pages 218–225)

      Geoffrey Burnstock

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100130

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the 1970s it was discovered that ATP could act as a neurotransmitter, and further research in this area has not only led to the cloning of the respective receptors, but also to the discovery that purinergic signalling is involved in pathophysiology, which might make it amenable to therapeutic strategies.

    5. Red algal parasites: Models for a life history evolution that leaves photosynthesis behind again and again (pages 226–235)

      Nicolas A. Blouin and Christopher E. Lane

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100139

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Parasites from the red algal lineage provide a unique and powerful model to investigate the genetic origins of a parasitic lifestyle, because they not only share a recent common ancestor with an extant free-living red algal species, but also because parasitism has independently arisen over 100 times within this group.

    6. Problems & Paradigms

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Scientific discovery as a combinatorial optimisation problem: How best to navigate the landscape of possible experiments? (pages 236–244)

      Douglas B. Kell

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100144

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Many scientific problems (e.g. gene and drug discovery, metabolic engineering for the biotechnological improvement of organisms) can be viewed as a ‘landscape’ representing a large search space of possible solutions or experiments populated by a considerably smaller number of actual solutions that then emerge.

  7. Meetings

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Meetings
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Meetings

      Genetics and genomics in wildlife studies: Implications for ecology, evolution, and conservation biology (pages 245–246)

      Fernando Cruz, Adrian C. Brennan, Alejandro Gonzalez-Voyer, Violeta Muñoz-Fuentes, Muthukrishnan Eaaswarkhanth, Séverine Roques and F. Xavier Picó

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100171

    2. Searching for Eve: Basal metazoans and the evolution of multicellular complexity (pages 247–251)

      Michaël Manuel and Sylvain Forêt

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100183

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This biennial international workshop discusses the latest progress in non-bilaterian animal research.

  8. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Meetings
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2012, February (pages A1-A8)

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290008

  9. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Meetings
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290009

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