BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 5

Special Issue: Light Microscopy

May 2012

Volume 34, Issue 5

Pages 329–441

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. Imaging probes for microscopy
    7. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions
    8. High resolution microscopy
    9. Computational image analysis
    10. Product Information
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 5/2012

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290019

      Light Microscopy: From imaging probes to high resolution techniques andcomputational image analysis. On pages 333–340 Jason Swedlow gives a nice overview over the topics covered in this Special Issue. Advances in optics, automation, computational tools and imaging probes allow the visualization of ever smaller structures at increasing resolution. Furthermore, these techniques can be used for a wide variety of applications from basic research to clinical domains, e.g. by employing imaging techniques for screening.

      The image shows a section of mouse small intestine stained with DAPI (blue), anti-tubulin (red) and phalloidin (green).

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. Imaging probes for microscopy
    7. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions
    8. High resolution microscopy
    9. Computational image analysis
    10. Product Information
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      Biology and microscopy: The friendship strengthens… (page 329)

      Patricia Le Baccon and Andrew Moore

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290016

  3. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. Imaging probes for microscopy
    7. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions
    8. High resolution microscopy
    9. Computational image analysis
    10. Product Information
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 5/2012 (pages 330–331)

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290017

  4. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. Imaging probes for microscopy
    7. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions
    8. High resolution microscopy
    9. Computational image analysis
    10. Product Information
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. Perspective

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Innovation in biological microscopy: Current status and future directions (pages 333–340)

      Jason R. Swedlow

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100168

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent advances in biological microscopy (such as FLIM, FCS, PALM, STED) have also led to new applications, from basic research to preclinical and even clinical domains. Furthermore, these methods generate huge and complex datasets and thus require increasingly sophisticated downstream processing and analysis.

  5. Imaging probes for microscopy

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. Imaging probes for microscopy
    7. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions
    8. High resolution microscopy
    9. Computational image analysis
    10. Product Information
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. Methods, Models & Techniques

      Fluorescent proteins for FRET microscopy: Monitoring protein interactions in living cells (pages 341–350)

      Richard N. Day and Michael W. Davidson

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100098

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Different methods can be used to improve FRET, such as spectral bleedthrough correction and acceptor photobleaching methods (for the quantification of FRET signals) or spectral imaging and FLIM (fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy). The discovery of new fluorescent proteins (e.g. from corals) will broaden the possibilities to explore new FRET pairs.

    2. SHG nanoprobes: Advancing harmonic imaging in biology (pages 351–360)

      William P. Dempsey, Scott E. Fraser and Periklis Pantazis

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100106

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      SHG nanoprobes are nanoparticles (e.g. crystals such as barium titanate BaTiO3) that produce light through a mechanism known as second harmonic generation (SHG). Because of their photophysical properties they offer unique advantages for molecular imaging studies, especially in single molecule and deep-tissue imaging.

  6. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. Imaging probes for microscopy
    7. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions
    8. High resolution microscopy
    9. Computational image analysis
    10. Product Information
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. Methods, Models & Techniques

      Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (pages 361–368)

      Jonas Ries and Petra Schwille

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100111

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) allows the measurement of concentrations, mobilities, and interactions of fluorescent biomolecules based on the statistical analysis of intensity fluctuations. It has already been applied to a wide range of research topics, such as the study of single molecule translocations through nuclear pores or the determination of the stoichiometry of molecular complexes at adhesions.

    2. FRET microscopy in the living cell: Different approaches, strengths and weaknesses (pages 369–376)

      Sergi Padilla-Parra and Marc Tramier

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100086

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Depending on the application, different FRET methods can be used: the ratio approach is useful for detecting intramolecular FRET, while fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) should be used for quantitatively detecting intermolecular interactions.

    3. Scanning image correlation spectroscopy (pages 377–385)

      Michelle A. Digman and Enrico Gratton

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100118

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recently, different fluctuation correlation methods, such as fluorescent correlation spectroscopy (FCS), raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) and pair correlation function have been developed. These methods can be used to examine various kinds of dynamics: protein diffusion and interaction, protein aggregation, detection of barriers to diffusion etc.

  7. High resolution microscopy

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. Imaging probes for microscopy
    7. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions
    8. High resolution microscopy
    9. Computational image analysis
    10. Product Information
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. Methods, Models & Techniques

      Super-resolution imaging prompts re-thinking of cell biology mechanisms : Selected cases using stimulated emission depletion microscopy (pages 386–395)

      Sinem Saka and Silvio O. Rizzoli

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100080

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy allows researchers to overcome the diffraction barrier, and has the advantage that the high-resolution image is obtained in a direct fashion. Such super-resolution imaging revealsgreaterbiological complexity than hitherto witnessed. It increasingly necessitates new interpretations of data, and sometimes revises our understanding ofbiological structures and mechanisms.

    2. Quantitative analysis of photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) datasets using pair-correlation analysis (pages 396–405)

      Prabuddha Sengupta and Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200022

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Inphotoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) photoactivable fluorescent proteins (PA-FPs) are stochastically activated, imaged, their localization determined and then bleached. By repeating this cycle with different subsets of PA-FPs and combining the data, a super-resolution image is obtained. An overview of latest developments in pair-correlation analysis is given here.

    3. Methods Models & Techniques

      Slicing embryos gently with laser light sheets (pages 406–411)

      Jan Huisken

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100120

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light sheet microscopy is ideally suited to in vivo imaging over long periods of time as it not only offers low photo-toxicity but also high image acquisition rates. One example of this technique is selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) which, for example, even allows imaging of entire embryos with isotropic resolution.

    4. Methods, Models & Techniques

      The potential of 3D-FISH and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy for studies of 3D nuclear architecture : 3D structured illumination microscopy of defined chromosomal structures visualized by 3D (immuno)-FISH opens new perspectives for studies of nuclear architecture (pages 412–426)

      Yolanda Markaki, Daniel Smeets, Susanne Fiedler, Volker J. Schmid, Lothar Schermelleh, Thomas Cremer and Marion Cremer

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100176

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) can be used to study nuclear architecture at the ultrastructural level.This method can also be combined with 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) for the topographical analysis of defined nuclear targets. The proof of principle of this combination of methods lies in the high degree of structural preservation of chromatin presented here.

  8. Computational image analysis

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. Imaging probes for microscopy
    7. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions
    8. High resolution microscopy
    9. Computational image analysis
    10. Product Information
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. Methods, Models & Techniques

      Image analysis in fluorescence microscopy: Bacterial dynamics as a case study (pages 427–436)

      Sven van Teeffelen, Joshua W. Shaevitz and Zemer Gitai

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100148

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Modern microscopy techniques generate large amounts of data that require subsequent computational image processing, analysis and modeling. These image analysis tools include methods to reduce noise and enhance features of fluorescence images in order to determine cell contours and to precisely localize fluorescent spots.

  9. Product Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. Imaging probes for microscopy
    7. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions
    8. High resolution microscopy
    9. Computational image analysis
    10. Product Information
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 5/2012 (pages 437–441)

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290018

  10. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. Imaging probes for microscopy
    7. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions
    8. High resolution microscopy
    9. Computational image analysis
    10. Product Information
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2012, April (pages A1-A8)

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290020

  11. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. Imaging probes for microscopy
    7. Probing molecular dynamics and interactions
    8. High resolution microscopy
    9. Computational image analysis
    10. Product Information
    11. BiotecVisions
    12. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290021

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