BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 6

June 2012

Volume 34, Issue 6

Pages 443–521

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Corrigendum
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 6/2012

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290024

      The role of fat in C. elegans aging. Recent studies imply that lipases and lipid desaturases can mediate signaling effects on aging. However, the exact molecular processes underlying this phenomenon still remain unclear. On pages 466–471 of this issue, Daniel Ackerman and David Gems give more insights into possible mechanisms. Aging worms show a widespread increase in deposition of fat and increased levels of yolk lipoproteins. This ectopic fat deposition may cause lipotoxic effects, contributing to the age-related decline in tissue function. On the other hand, removal of the germline in C. elegans extends lifespan by inducing/increasing lipase, autophagy and FAT-6 desaturase expression, thus leading to a healthier lipid status.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Corrigendum
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Corrigendum
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 6/2012 (pages 445–446)

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290023

  4. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Corrigendum
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Ex laboratorio

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      Collegiality and careerism trump critical questions and bold new ideas: A student's perspective and solution : The structure of scientific funding limits bold new ideas (pages 448–450)

      Joshua M. Nicholson

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200001

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      Funding agencies (and journals) seem to be discriminating against ideas that are contrary to the mainstream, leading to leading to the preferential funding of predictable and safe research over radically new ideas. To remedy this problem a restructuring of the scientific funding system is needed, e.g. by utilizing laymen - together with scientists - to evaluate grant proposals.

    2. Ideas & Speculations

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Hiccups: A new explanation for the mysterious reflex (pages 451–453)

      Daniel Howes

      Article first published online: 29 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100194

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      The hiccup may have evolved to remove swallowed air from the stomach, which may help suckling mammals to consume more milk.

    3. You have free access to this content
      The male fight-flight response: A result of SRY regulation of catecholamines? (pages 454–457)

      Joohyung Lee and Vincent R. Harley

      Article first published online: 8 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100159

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      The SRY gene, which is located on the Y chromosome and directs male development, may promote aggression and other traditionally male behavioural traits, resulting in the fight-or-flight reaction to stress.

    4. Think again

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      Beyond the connectome: How neuromodulators shape neural circuits (pages 458–465)

      Cornelia I. Bargmann

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100185

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      The connectome anatomically describes the entire synaptic connections in a given brain. However, there seem to be more connections than absolutely necessary, and neuromodulators specify which of these connections are active at any given time.

  5. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Corrigendum
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Recently in press

      The mystery of C. elegans aging: An emerging role for fat : Distant parallels between C. elegans aging and metabolic syndrome? (pages 466–471)

      Daniel Ackerman and David Gems

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100189

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      Recent studies suggest that changes in lipid composition (and not total lipid levels) may retard aging in C. elegans. Furthermore, ectopic accumulation of fat in aging worms may cause lipotoxic effects, contributing to the age-related decline in tissue function.

    2. Somatic cell reprogramming for regenerative medicine: SCNT vs. iPS cells (pages 472–476)

      Guangjin Pan, Tao Wang, Hongjie Yao and Duanqing Pei

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100174

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      The generation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells holds great potential for regenerative medicine and can be achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) or by the forced expression of a just a few transcription factors in somatic cells to generate induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

    3. Newly evolved genes: Moving from comparative genomics to functional studies in model systems : How important is genetic novelty for species adaptation and diversification? (pages 477–483)

      José M. Ranz and John Parsch

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100177

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      New genes can be created either by duplication, by gene fusion, or by de novo formation from non-coding DNA. These newly created genes can quickly become integrated into genetic networks and even become essential for survival or fertility.

    4. Microbial manipulation of host sex determination : Endosymbiotic bacteria can directly manipulate their host's sex determination towards the production of female offspring (pages 484–488)

      Leo W. Beukeboom

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100192

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      Sex determination in insects is achieved through the action of a cascade of genes, and symbionts may interfere with their host at different levels of this cascade. One example is the lepidopteran Ostrinia scapulalis, where Wolbachia bacteria alter the sex-specific splicing of the doublesex master switch gene.

    5. Review essays

      Extracellular vesicles – vehicles that spread cancer genes (pages 489–497)

      Janusz Rak and Abhijit Guha

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100169

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      Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are capable of transferring a wide spectrum of macromolecules, such as oncogenes and tumour suppressors, from one cell to another (e.g. also from a mutant cancer cell to a normal one). The molecular analysis of EV-derived material holds potential to be used for clinical purposes.

    6. Banding patterns in Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes correlate with DNA-binding protein occupancy (pages 498–508)

      Igor F. Zhimulev, Elena S. Belyaeva, Tatiana Yu Vatolina and Sergey A. Demakov

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100142

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      Recent genome-wide protein mapping efforts in Drosophila have provided information on the proteins associated with interbands as well as on the correspondence between the genomic maps and the polytene chromosome structure, and have shown that the polytene chromosome structure is likely to provide a good representation of the organisation of interphase chromatin in diploid cells.

    7. Methods, Models & Techniques

      Characterization of chromatin domains by 3D fluorescence microscopy: An automated methodology for quantitative analysis and nuclei screening (pages 509–517)

      Sylvain Cantaloube, Kelly Romeo, Patricia Le Baccon, Geneviève Almouzni and Jean-Pierre Quivy

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201100188

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      This method allows the quantitative analysis of the localisation of several endogenous markers (e.g. heterochromatin protein 1, HP1) at pericentric heterochromatin domains imaged via immunofluorescence microscopy.

  6. Reports & Opinion

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Corrigendum
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Book reviews

      A network of paths toward innovation (pages 518–520)

      Jeremy A. Draghi and Joshua B. Plotkin

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200016

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  7. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Corrigendum
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      Proteolytic processing of the p75 neurotrophin receptor: A prerequisite for signalling? (page 521)

      S. Skeldal, D. Matusica, A. Nykjaer and E. J. Coulson

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201110036

      This article corrects:

      Proteolytic processing of the p75 neurotrophin receptor: A prerequisite for signalling?

      Vol. 33, Issue 8, 614–625, Article first published online: 30 JUN 2011

  8. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Corrigendum
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2012, May (pages A1-A8)

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290025

  9. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Reports & Opinion
    8. Corrigendum
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290026

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