BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 1

January 2013

Volume 35, Issue 1

Pages 1–74

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 1/2013

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290064

      Chemical biology and sensitive microscopy: How labeling and advanced microscopy techniques can synergistically drive the fi eld of biomolecular imaging. Major developments in the fi elds of protein engineering for fl uorescence labeling and advanced microscopy techniques, such as super-resolution microscopy, or single-molecule spectroscopy, have in the recent past allowed both areas to advance substantially. On pages 65–74, Milles and Lemke review the state of the art in both areas and evaluate how they can feedback on each other to fulfi ll the demands of precision single-molecule studies (lower left). While the modifi cation of proteins through unnatural amino acids offers the minimal possible modifi cation to which a fl uorophore can be attached (upper left), it also has the potential of labeling within living cells. The suitability of different fl uorescent dyes for super-resolution microscopy, as well as fl uorescence resonance energy transfer based approaches, is also reviewed with a view to multi-parameter single molecule microscopy inside the cell (right).

      Cover by S. Milles and E. A. Lemke

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Next Issue
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  3. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 1/2013 (pages 2–3)

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290063

  4. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Next Issue
    1. Hypotheses

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      Coagulase-negative staphylococci as reservoirs of genes facilitating MRSA infection : Staphylococcal commensal species such as Staphylococcus epidermidis are being recognized as important sources of genes promoting MRSA colonization and virulence (pages 4–11)

      Michael Otto

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200112

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Staphylococcus epidermidis is a source for factors that – after horizontal gene transfer – enable Staphylococcus aureus to survive in the human host and cause disease: colonization factors, antibiotic resistance genes, and rarely toxins. The transfer of genes from S. aureus to S. epidermidis is unusual and possibly blocked by CRISPR-mediated interference.

    2. Ideas & Speculations

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      Active conversion to the prion state as a molecular switch for cellular adaptation to environmental stress (pages 12–16)

      Genjiro Suzuki and Motomasa Tanaka

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200121

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Yeast prion might be a disease state in most situations, but it might help cells survive under some stress environments.

  5. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Next Issue
    1. Recently in press

      How is functional specificity achieved through disordered regions of proteins? (pages 17–22)

      Rahul K. Das, Anuradha Mittal and Rohit V. Pappu

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      N-terminal disordered regions control inactivation of potassium channels. The mechanism of inactivation is different for BK channel versus Shaker channels. The former populates an O* state that shows intermediate activity. Adaptation of existing phenomenological models for coupled folding and binding explains channel-specific differences in N-type inactivation through disordered regions.

    2. The nuclear import machinery is a determinant of influenza virus host adaptation (pages 23–27)

      Patricia Resa-Infante and Gülsah Gabriel

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200138

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      Importin-α isoforms possess multiple functions carried out on both sites of the nuclear envelope. Influenza viruses utilize importin-α functions directly related to the nuclear import of cargo proteins or other functions beyond transport to regulate polymerase activity in the nucleus of the host cell.

    3. A circuit-based gatekeeper for adult neural stem cell proliferation : Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons of the dentate gyrus control the activation and proliferation of quiescent adult neural stem cells (pages 28–33)

      Jonathan Moss and Nicolas Toni

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200136

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A recent paper by Song and colleagues in Nature demonstrates how the spillover of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), from parvalbumin (PV) interneuron synapses within the adult mouse dentate gyrus, activates γ2 subunit-containing GABAA receptors of radial glia-like (RGL) stem cells, to suppress their proliferation and subsequent differentiation into mature neurons.

    4. Review essays

      Endocytosis and autophagy: Shared machinery for degradation (pages 34–45)

      Christopher A. Lamb, Hannah C. Dooley and Sharon A. Tooze

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200130

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      In this review, we highlight the role of the endocytic pathway as a source of membrane for autophagosome formation, and how regulators of endocytosis also impinge on autophagy. We also discuss how the lysosome acts as a hub for factors which regulate the initiation of autophagy.

    5. Processing of snoRNAs as a new source of regulatory non-coding RNAs : snoRNA fragments form a new class of functional RNAs (pages 46–54)

      Marina Falaleeva and Stefan Stamm

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200117

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Small nuclear RNAs (snoRNAs) can be further processed into shorter metabolically stable RNAs that can be subdivided into miRNAs and processed snoRNAs, collectively referred to as sdRNAs for snoRNA derived RNAs. sdRNAs form different RNA protein complexes than canonical snoRNAs and function in translational control, gene expression, and alternative splicing.

    6. HIPK2: A tumour suppressor that controls DNA damage-induced cell fate and cytokinesis (pages 55–64)

      Thomas G. Hofmann, Carolina Glas and Nadja Bitomsky

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200060

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Apoptosis defects and genomic instability are hallmarks of cancer cells. The checkpoint kinase HIPK2 is an emerging tumour suppressor that regulates DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Recent evidence indicates a critical role of the kinase in cytokinesis and in maintaining the correct ploidy of cells.

    7. What precision-protein-tuning and nano-resolved single molecule sciences can do for each other (pages 65–74)

      Sigrid Milles and Edward A. Lemke

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200094

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluorescence technologies provide key to study molecular structure and dynamics with super spatial and temporal resolution. We discuss how synergistic developments of novel labeling technologies combined with optical engineering can make the biggest contribution to advance state of the art tools for both, in vitro and non-invasive in vivo measurements.

  6. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2013, December (pages A1-A8)

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290065

  7. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201290066

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