BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 11

November 2013

Volume 35, Issue 11

Pages 925–1013

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Next Issue
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      BioEssays 11∕2013

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370111

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Unfold, rotate and activate: New insights into insulin receptor activation. On pages 945–954, Ward et al. review the most recent data on how insulin binds to its receptor and speculate on the ensuing conformational changes that lead to signal transduction within the cell. The cover shows the ectodomain of the insulin receptor (αβ)2 homodimer (orange/purple). Binding of insulin (represented in cyan) leads to a conformational change within the ectodomain that is as yet only partially understood, ultimately resulting in the activation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domains.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
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    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
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      BioEssays 11∕2013

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370112

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
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  4. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
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      BioEssays 11∕2013 (pages 926–927)

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370114

  5. Idea to watch

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
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  6. Insights & Perspectives

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    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
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    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
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    1. Hypotheses

      Smarter neuronal signaling complexes from existing components: How regulatory modifications were acquired during animal evolution : Evolution of palmitoylation-dependent regulation of AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (pages 929–939)

      Gareth M. Thomas and Takashi Hayashi

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300076

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      In nervous systems of organisms with higher brain function, smarter neuronal signaling complexes have arisen from primitive AMPA-type glutamate receptor components through evolutionary acquisition of post-translational palmitoylation sites and PDZ-binding motifs. These additional regulatory modifications may allow more precise control of protein localization and activity to support higher brain functions.

  7. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
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    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
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    7. Insights & Perspectives
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    1. Recently in press

      Major depressive disorder: A loss of circadian synchrony? (pages 940–944)

      Nicole Edgar and Colleen A. McClung

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300086

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      Li and colleagues organized microarray data from human post-mortem brain tissue in a pseudo-time series to examine molecular rhythms. They revealed that healthy subjects have strong diurnal gene expression patterns in several brain regions outside the SCN, and these patterns are significantly disrupted in subjects with major depressive disorder.

    2. Review essays

      The insulin receptor changes conformation in unforeseen ways on ligand binding: Sharpening the picture of insulin receptor activation (pages 945–954)

      Colin W. Ward, John G. Menting and Michael C. Lawrence

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300065

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The understanding of the insulin/insulin receptor interaction has been advanced significantly by the recent report of structures of the insulin/insulin receptor site 1 complex. Here, we review these findings and discuss their implications for broader conformation change within the receptor and the mechanisms of signal transduction.

    3. Mitochondrial fission-fusion as an emerging key regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation (pages 955–964)

      Kasturi Mitra

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300011

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      The decision to remain in a proliferative state or to exit toward differentiation, quiescence, or senescence is key for cells in the developmental journey. I propose that mitochondrial morphology, controlled by mitochondrial fission-fusion proteins, is a crucial factor for guiding such cellular decisions, aberrations in which may lead to developmental anomalies.

    4. The Warburg effect then and now: From cancer to inflammatory diseases (pages 965–973)

      Eva M. Palsson-McDermott and Luke A. J. O'Neill

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300084

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      Recent studies reveal that inflammatory cells, when activated, display similar metabolic traits as cancer cells. During an inflammatory response or infection pro-inflammatory immune cells can shift their metabolism away from oxidative phosphorylation towards a high rate of glycolysis, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect.

    5. Problems & Paradigms

      Cell death proteins: An evolutionary role in cellular adaptation before the advent of apoptosis (pages 974–983)

      Sarah A. Dick and Lynn A. Megeney

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300052

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      The evolutionary pressures for active cell death (apoptosis) in single-celled organisms remain controversial. Here, we present the hypothesis whereby the cell death machinery (namely caspases/metacaspases) evolved as a co-option or co-adaptation of a previous non-death function. Our in-depth analysis establishes that non-apoptotic activity of death centric proteins is an equally ancient and conserved function across the phyla.

    6. Quinary protein structure and the consequences of crowding in living cells: Leaving the test-tube behind (pages 984–993)

      Anna Jean Wirth and Martin Gruebele

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300080

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      The crowded intracellular environment gives rise to forces that can have energetic consequences for the weak, transient protein-protein interactions called quinary structure.

    7. Stem cells and aging from a quasi-immortal point of view (pages 994–1003)

      Anna-Marei Boehm, Philip Rosenstiel and Thomas C. G. Bosch

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300075

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      In quasi-immortal Hydra, the stable expression of Forkhead box-containing transcription factor FoxO maintains stem cell functionality and immune homeostasis and thereby is preventing Hydra from aging, consequently leading to an unlimited lifespan.

    8. Methods, Models & Techniques

      An invertebrate stomach's view on vertebrate ecology : Certain invertebrates could be used as “vertebrate samplers” and deliver DNA-based information on many aspects of vertebrate ecology (pages 1004–1013)

      Sébastien Calvignac-Spencer, Fabian H. Leendertz, M. Thomas P. Gilbert and Grit Schubert

      Version of Record online: 2 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300060

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      Recent studies have shown that invertebrates feeding on vertebrates can be used to characterize local vertebrate biodiversity through DNA analysis. Such invertebrate-derived DNA (iDNA) can be predicted to allow for a number of further applications, including vertebrate population genetics and infectious disease surveillance.

  8. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370115

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