BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 2

February 2013

Volume 35, Issue 2

Pages 77–144

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Meetings
    8. BiotecVisions
    9. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 2/2013

      Wenwen Fang and Laura F. Landweber

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390002

      RNA's role in genome rearrangement. Ciliated protists, such as Oxytricha, shown, have two types of nuclei that differentiate from each other. Development in these microbial eukaryotes provides a paragon for studies of genome remodeling, with extensive use of non-coding RNAs. On pages 84–87 of this issue, Wenwen Fang and Laura Landweber discuss how RNA-guided processes of genome rearrangement or repair could influence other eukaryotes. Cover by Wenyi Fang. SEM images courtesy of Robert Hammersmith.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Meetings
    8. BiotecVisions
    9. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      What's in a peer review report? (page 77)

      Andrew Moore

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390000

  3. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Meetings
    8. BiotecVisions
    9. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 2/2013 (pages 78–79)

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390001

  4. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Meetings
    8. BiotecVisions
    9. Next Issue
    1. Ideas & Speculations

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      Epithelial cell translocation: New insights into mechanisms of tumor initiation (pages 80–83)

      Cheuk T. Leung

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200151

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A cell translocation mechanism displaces sporadic mutant cells from normal, suppressive epithelial environment during early steps of tumor initiation. This epithelial cell translocation process exerts a selective pressure on early mutant cells to survive and grow in new microenvironment outside of their native niches.

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      RNA-mediated genome rearrangement: Hypotheses and evidence (pages 84–87)

      Wenwen Fang and Laura F. Landweber

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200140

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      RNA may mediate genome rearrangement by serving as a repair template for double-stranded DNA break repair (A), a scaffold to bring two genomic loci into proximity in space (B), or a recruiting agent for DNA repair complexesor chromatin modification complexes required for DNA repair (C).

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      Hox transcriptional specificity despite a single class of cofactors: Are flexible interaction modes the key? : Plasticity in Hox/PBC interaction modes as a common molecular strategy for shaping Hox transcriptional activities (pages 88–92)

      Samir Merabet and Bruno Hudry

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200146

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hox proteins use flexible interaction modes with their common PBC cofactors to diversify and specify their transcriptional activities in vivo: the tangram-like model.

  5. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Meetings
    8. BiotecVisions
    9. Next Issue
    1. Recently in press

      Mitochondria, maternal inheritance, and asymmetric fitness: Why males die younger (pages 93–99)

      Jonci N. Wolff and Neil J. Gemmell

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200141

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The maternal inheritance of mtDNA results in a selection asymmetry; natural selection cannot act on mutations that affect only males. This asymmetry imposes a male-specific mutation load previously implicated in male disease and infertility. New work suggests this asymmetry underpins the strong sexual dimorphism in aging observed across taxa.

    2. New perspectives on the evolution of exaggerated traits (pages 100–107)

      Alexander W. Shingleton and W. Anthony Frankino

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200139

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Extreme morphologies arise when traits, such as horns or tails, are disproportionally exaggerated in large individuals. Here we review a recent paper that takes a developmental perspective to explain how these traits may evolve through sexual selection.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Bacterial cooperation in the wild and in the clinic: Are pathogen social behaviours relevant outside the laboratory? (pages 108–112)

      Freya Harrison

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200154

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lab experiments show that social interactions between bacterial cells can determine virulence, and suggest that bacterial sociality could be exploited for prophylactic purposes. But it remains unclear how far we can apply the results of lab experiments to pathogens ‘in the wild.’ A recent study begins to address this question.

    4. Review essays

      Synthetic polymers and their potential as genetic materials (pages 113–122)

      Vitor B. Pinheiro, David Loakes and Philipp Holliger

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      DNA and RNA are the only natural genetic materials, but are not unique. Systematic modification of their chemical moieties – nucleobase, sugar, phosphate – highlights that all contribute to their role as chemical repositories of information. Sugar-modified nucleic acids capable of replication expand the Central Dogma and have great biotechnological promise.

    5. Problems & Paradigms

      Non-random mutation: The evolution of targeted hypermutation and hypomutation (pages 123–130)

      Iñigo Martincorena and Nicholas M. Luscombe

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200150

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mutations are traditionally assumed to occur randomly with respect to fitness. However, mutation rates can vary along a genome and this variation can be evolutionarily optimized under certain conditions. Here we discuss the conditions and mechanisms by which selectively favourable mutational cold and hot spots can evolve along a genome.

    6. Methods, Models & Techniques

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Population transcriptomics with single-cell resolution: A new field made possible by microfluidics : A technology for high throughput transcript counting and data-driven definition of cell types (pages 131–140)

      Charles Plessy, Linda Desbois, Teruo Fujii and Piero Carninci

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200093

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Whole-transcriptome analysis at the highest resolution: for each individual cell in a population, the RNA molecules are identified and counted. Quantitative “next-generation” sequencing and miniaturized microfluidics “labs on chips” make possible high-throughput “population transcriptomics” at the single-cell level.

  6. Meetings

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Meetings
    8. BiotecVisions
    9. Next Issue
    1. Meetings

      Coal mining meets chromatin research: Digging for mechanisms in epigenetic control of gene expression : Report from the 43rd Annual Meeting of the German Genetics Society on “Chromatin and Epigenetics” in Essen, Germany (pages 141–144)

      Ann Ehrenhofer-Murray, Hemmo Meyer and Wolfgang Nellen

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200149

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This meeting brought together researchers from the fields of chromatin and epigenetics to discuss the latest mechanistic insights into how histone and DNA modifications impact on gene expression, chromatin organisation and chromatin duplication. Novel insights into epigenetic aspects of centromeric chromatin and chromosome segregation were also reported at the meeting.

  7. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Meetings
    8. BiotecVisions
    9. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2013, January (pages A1-A8)

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390003

  8. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Insights & Perspectives
    6. Prospects & Overviews
    7. Meetings
    8. BiotecVisions
    9. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390004

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