BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 3

Special Issue: Stem Cells

March 2013

Volume 35, Issue 3

Pages 147–298

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 3/2013

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390006

      Epithelial to mesenchymal transition as a portal to stem cell characters embedded in gene networks. The cover image shows the mouse proepicardial organ (PEO) at 9.5 dpc highlighted by Wt1 expression (bright red, centre). Bridges formed to the myocardium are a prelude to migration of proepicardial cells over the surface of the heart to form the epicardium. On pages 191–200 Naisana Asli and Richard Harvey review epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) from a newly emerging angle that repositions this historically well-regarded process as central to stem cell character. The authors suggest that EMT is embedded within the gene regulatory network of certain stem cell populations, and postulate that ectopic induction of EMT might well be benefi cial to tissue regeneration.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      Stem cell science and regenerative medicine (pages 147–148)

      Patrick P. L. Tam and Martin F. Pera

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300003

  3. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 3/2013 (pages 150–151)

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390005

  4. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Next Issue
    1. Review essays

      Genome damage in induced pluripotent stem cells: Assessing the mechanisms and their consequences (pages 152–162)

      Samer M. I. Hussein, Judith Elbaz and Andras A. Nagy

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200114

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      Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are cells with embryonic stem cell properties, but reprogrammed from a differentiated cell. This paper discusses the effect of reprogramming on the genetic integrity of iPSCs, and speculates about the underlying mechanisms influencing the occurrence of DNA damage and repair in iPSCs.

    2. Organ engineering – combining stem cells, biomaterials, and bioreactors to produce bioengineered organs for transplantation (pages 163–172)

      Sean Vincent Murphy and Anthony Atala

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200062

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      The goal of organ engineering is to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Recent progress in stem cell biology, biomaterials and processes such as organ decellularization and electrospinning has resulted in the generation of bioengineered replacement tissues and organs for patients.

    3. Mesenchymal stem cells for systemic therapy: Shotgun approach or magic bullets? (pages 173–182)

      Susan M. Millard and Nicholas M. Fisk

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200087

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      Three major paradigms are envisaged for the exploitation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) as therapeutic agents. Each paradigm utilises different properties ascribed to MSC regardless of their ontological source. These include low immunogenicity, differentiation potential, rich production of paracrine factors and being amenable to modification to act as therapeutic-carriers.

    4. Nichotherapy for stem cells: There goes the neighborhood (pages 183–190)

      Jean-Pierre Levesque, Ingrid G. Winkler and John E. J. Rasko

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200111

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      Stem cells and their malignant counterparts require the support of a specific microenvironment or “niche.” We have coined the term “nichotherapy” to recognize the importance of niche biology. Nichotherapy encompases stem cell mobilization and expansion technologies, attempts to chemosensitize leukemia and cancer stem cells, and to repair damaged bone marrow.

    5. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition as a portal to stem cell characters embedded in gene networks (pages 191–200)

      Naisana S. Asli and Richard P. Harvey

      Version of Record online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200089

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and its reverse, mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET), regulate epithelial state. Here, we explore whether the machinery for EMT and MET might also be embedded in stem cell networks, and act as portals for transitions between cell identities.

    6. Blood stem cell products: Toward sustainable benchmarks for clinical translation (pages 201–210)

      Elizabeth Csaszar, Sandra Cohen and Peter W. Zandstra

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200118

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      The robust and reliable translation of ex vivo expanded umbilical cord blood derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for the wide-spread clinical use for transplantation will require the implementation of bioengineering strategies to overcome technical and economic challenges of scale-up, reproducibility, and product quality assurance.

    7. The limbal epithelium of the eye – A review of limbal stem cell biology, disease and treatment (pages 211–219)

      Charles Osei-Bempong, Francisco C. Figueiredo and Majlinda Lako

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200086

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      The limbus surrounds the clear cornea and contains limbal stem cells that regenerate the corneal epithelium. Limbal stem cell deficiency is characterised by the impairment of the limbus, limbal stem cells and their ability to replenish the cornea. Future treatments will benefit from developments in the stem cell field.

    8. The promise and challenges of stem cell-based therapies for skeletal diseases : Stem cell applications in skeletal medicine: Potential, cell sources and characteristics, and challenges of clinical translation (pages 220–230)

      Solvig Diederichs, Kristy M. Shine and Rocky S. Tuan

      Version of Record online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200068

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      Multipotent adult mesenchymal stem cells, with their recently demonstrated trophic and immune regulatory activities, hold high promise for cell-based therapies for skeletal diseases, although their origin and nature remain incompletely understood. Recent developments in pluripotent stem cells have also advanced their potential as another cell source for regenerative medicine.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The emerging biology of muscle stem cells: Implications for cell-based therapies (pages 231–241)

      C. Florian Bentzinger, Yu Xin Wang, Julia von Maltzahn and Michael A. Rudnicki

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200063

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The therapeutic use of satellite cells, atypical myogenic cells, and ES/iPS cells hold great promise for the treatment of muscle disease. However, myogenic cells are functionally heterogeneous. The propensity for differentiation and the capacity to retain stemness have emerged as critical determinants of the outcome of experimental cell-based therapies.

    10. Fate specification in the adult brain – lessons for eliciting neurogenesis from glial cells (pages 242–252)

      Jovica Ninkovic and Magdalena Götz

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200108

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      Energy states describe both the lineage commitment and the trans-differentiation between different lineages. Lineage commitment occurs as the progression towards the energy minimum. Multilineage potential is only possible if stem cells are actively maintained at a higher energy level allowing progression into several different lineages.

    11. The roots of cancer: Stem cells and the basis for tumor heterogeneity (pages 253–260)

      Maho Shibata and Michael M. Shen

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200101

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Concepts from stem cell biology can explain the basis for intertumoral heterogeneity between different tumors of the same tissue type, as well as intratumoral heterogeneity within a single tumor. In this review, we discuss the cell of origin, cancer stem cells, and clonal evolution, with a focus on prostate cancer.

    12. Stem cells of the respiratory system: From identification to differentiation into functional epithelium (pages 261–270)

      Michael D. Green, Sarah X.L. Huang and Hans-Willem Snoeck

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200090

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent progress in the identification of lung and airway stem cells and in the generation of respiratory epithelial cells from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) will have a profound impact on our understanding of human lung development and disease, and on the prospect of regenerative therapy for lung disease.

    13. Disease modelling using induced pluripotent stem cells: Status and prospects (pages 271–280)

      Oz Pomp and Alan Colman

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200088

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      To develop in vitro disease modelling for drug discovery, somatic cells are extracted from patients/controls, reprogrammed into iPSCs and then differentiated into cell populations that are relevant to the disease. However, there are many challenges to the success of this approach, some of which are indicated in the red-framed boxes.

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Current status of drug screening and disease modelling in human pluripotent stem cells (pages 281–298)

      Divya Rajamohan, Elena Matsa, Spandan Kalra, James Crutchley, Asha Patel, Vinoj George and Chris Denning

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200053

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      Human pluripotent stem cells are fast becoming the resource of choice for in vitro biomedical research. This review explores the role of these cells in drug safety and disease modelling, with emphasis on cardiomyocytes and neurons, and how their use is being integrated into automated platforms used by industry.

  5. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2013, February (pages A1-A8)

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390007

  6. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Prospects & Overviews
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390008

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