BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 4

April 2013

Volume 35, Issue 4

Pages 301–407

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Special collection
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 4/2013

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390012

      The various consequences of jumping: How mammalian transposons can differentially influence gene expression and function. Transposable elements (TEs) make up a large fraction of mammalian genomes. On pages 397–407, Akagi, Li and Symer discuss how these elements can exert wide-ranging biological impacts by variably affecting and disrupting gene expression, regulation, structure and function. Both germline and somatic mobilization of TEs can occur, potentially contributing to genetic diversity both between individuals in mammalian populations, and within individuals' tissues and cells. The authors discuss various factors that can influence the wide-ranging functional impacts of ongoing, endogenous transposition in mammals.

      Cover art by Anthony Baker (Medical Visuals, Health Sciences Library, The Ohio State University).

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Special collection
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Special collection
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 4/2013 (pages 302–303)

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390010

  4. Special collection

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Special collection
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Idea to watch

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Special collection
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      Hypothesis: Local dNTP depletion as the cause of microsatellite repeat instability during replication (Comment on DOI 10.1002/bies.201200128) (page 305)

      Michael Leffak

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300026

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum

      Vol. 36, Issue 6, Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2014

  6. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Special collection
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Hypotheses

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      Inhibition of DNA synthesis facilitates expansion of low-complexity repeats : Is strand slippage stimulated by transient local depletion of specific dNTPs? (pages 306–313)

      Andrei Kuzminov

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200128

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Expanded trinucleotide repeats are inherently unstable due to their propensity for strand slippage. I hypothesize that strand slippage is further promoted by local transient depletion of specific dNTPs during synthesis across this low-complexity DNA. Possible hairpin extrusion between polymerase and the clamp (the scheme) may explain saltatory repeat expansion.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Quality control of mitochondria during aging: Is there a good and a bad side of mitochondrial dynamics? (pages 314–322)

      Marc Thilo Figge, Heinz D. Osiewacz and Andreas S. Reichert

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mitochondria are essential eukaryotic organelles that represent a cellular “achilles heel”. Different pathways are active keeping mitochondria functional over time, including cycles of fusion and fission. We hypothesize that during aging mitochondrial dynamics may not only be beneficial but represents a double-edged sword with a good and a bad side.

    3. Ideas & Speculations

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      tRNA modifications: Necessary for correct tRNA-derived fragments during the recovery from stress? (pages 323–327)

      Zeljko Durdevic and Matthias Schaefer

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200158

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Endonuclease-mediated tRNA fragmentation has been observed in many species suggesting functional importance for tRNA fragments. The size distribution of tRNA-derived fragments indicates the existence of mechanisms that protect tRNAs and their fragments from total degradation by exonucleases. Could post-transcriptional modifications be important for the controlled processing of tRNAs?

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      Potential agricultural benefits through biotechnological manipulation of plant fungal associations (pages 328–331)

      Scott W. Behie and Michael J. Bidochka

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200147

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Genes involved in beneficial plant-fungal associations are attractive targets for biotechnological applications in agriculture. We suggest that some endophytic ascomycetous insect pathogenic fungi (i.e., Metarhizium) may be good candidates for these biotechnological manipulations.

    5. Think again

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      Why coelacanths are not ‘living fossils’ : A review of molecular and morphological data (pages 332–338)

      Didier Casane and Patrick Laurenti

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200145

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent studies that concluded that a slow rate of molecular evolution is linked to morphological conservatism in coelacanths are biased by the a priori hypothesis that these species are ‘living fossils’. We show that this outdated concept is not supported by actual molecular or paleontological data and does not make sense from a tree-thinking perspective.

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      Multicellularity arose several times in the evolution of eukaryotes (Response to DOI 10.1002/bies.201100187) (pages 339–347)

      Laura Wegener Parfrey and Daniel J. G. Lahr

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200143

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      All major clades of eukaryotes harbor multicellular taxa that evolved from unicellular ancestors. Similarities in the nature of multicellular cell-cell connections between animals and the slime mold Dictyostelium arose through convergence at the molecular and morphological level, not from common ancestry as was recently proposed. Image credits: David Patterson (starcentral.mbl.edu/microscope) and Alvaro Migotto (cifonauta.cebimar.usp.br).

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      How winner cells cause the demise of loser cells : Cell competition causes apoptosis of suboptimal cells: Their dregs are removed by hemocytes, thus preserving tissue homeostasis (pages 348–353)

      Fidel-Nicolás Lolo, Sergio Casas Tintó and Eduardo Moreno

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200156

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      During cell competition, winner cells induce apoptosis in loser cells by unknown mechanisms. Apoptotic debris is extruded basally from the epithelium to be cleared by hemocytes.

  7. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Special collection
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. Review essays

      Tuning a ménage à trois: Co-evolution and co-adaptation of nuclear and organellar genomes in plants (pages 354–365)

      Stephan Greiner and Ralph Bock

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200137

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Increasing evidence suggests that organellar (plastid and mitochondrial) genomes contribute significantly to environmental adaptation. As organellar genomes co-evolve with the nuclear genome, exchange of organelles between species or populations can result in genome conflicts (cytoplasmic incompatibilities). These incompatibilities can contribute to the establishment of hybridization barriers, ultimately leading to speciation.

    2. A mathematical basis for plant patterning derived from physico-chemical phenomena (pages 366–376)

      Thejasvi Beleyur, Valiya Kadavu Abdul Kareem, Anil Shaji and Kalika Prasad

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Local auxin accumulation marks the organ initiation and controls the organ positioning in plants. The dynamics of auxin accumulation is mediated by the concentration and orientation of auxin transporters, which in turn are controlled by an intricate feedback mechanism involving both transport and mechanical strain.

    3. Bag6/Bat3/Scythe: A novel chaperone activity with diverse regulatory functions in protein biogenesis and degradation (pages 377–385)

      Jin-Gu Lee and Yihong Ye

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200159

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Here we discuss a newly discovered chaperone complex that uses a special “holdase” activity to channel client proteins to distinct cellular destinations. This activity modulates various cellular processes including tail-anchored (TA) protein biogenesis, ER-associated degradation (ERAD), quality control of mislocalized proteins and defective ribosome products, transcriptional regulation, DNA damage response, and apoptosis.

    4. Problems & Paradigms

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      Identifying the genomic determinants of aging and longevity in human population studies: Progress and challenges (pages 386–396)

      Joris Deelen, Marian Beekman, Miriam Capri, Claudio Franceschi and P. Eline Slagboom

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200148

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A review on the accomplishments of genetic, transcriptomic, and epigenetic studies into the biology of aging and longevity by molecular and epidemiological analysis of human populations using family- and population-based study designs. In addition, the development of novel biomarkers of aging and their use for integrated data analysis is discussed.

    5. How do mammalian transposons induce genetic variation? A conceptual framework : The age, structure, allele frequency, and genome context of transposable elements may define their wide-ranging biological impacts (pages 397–407)

      Keiko Akagi, Jingfeng Li and David E. Symer

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200133

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Wide-ranging genetic variation caused by mammalian transposable elements. Schematics depict a mobile genetic element polymorphism in a genomic target site (top, YFG, your favorite gene); somatic mobilization in normal development or during cancer formation (middle, dark circles); and variable impacts of germline vs. somatic insertions accumulated over evolutionary time (bottom).

  8. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Special collection
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BiotecVisions 2013, March (pages A1-A8)

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390013

  9. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Contents and highlights of this issue
    5. Special collection
    6. Idea to watch
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. BiotecVisions
    10. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201390014

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