BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 8

August 2013

Volume 35, Issue 8

Pages 667–756

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea revisited
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Correspondence
    10. Next Issue
    11. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 8∕2013

      Article first published online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shared mechanisms of sexual development. Typical male and female traits (represented by the different colour patterns of Catonephele butterfl ies on the cover; males have the orange colour) were thought to develop via different mechanisms in vertebrates and insects. Vertebrates were believed to primarily use hormones produced in the gonads and insects to read their sex chromosomes in each cell, in order to develop sex-specifi c traits. However, as Bear and Monteiro discuss on pages 725–732 of this issue, new research indicates that birds, mammals, and insects use both hormonal and cell-autonomous mechanisms to develop their sex-specifi c traits. Cover by Antónia Monteiro.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea revisited
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Correspondence
    10. Next Issue
    11. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 8∕2013

      Article first published online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370082

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea revisited
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Correspondence
    10. Next Issue
    11. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea revisited
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Correspondence
    10. Next Issue
    11. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 8∕2013

      Article first published online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370084

  5. Idea revisited

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea revisited
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Correspondence
    10. Next Issue
    11. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      The basophil: Resolved questions and new avenues of investigation (page 670)

      Ervin E. Kara, Shaun R. McColl and Iain Comerford

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300044

    2. You have free access to this content
  6. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea revisited
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Correspondence
    10. Next Issue
    11. Corrigendum
    1. Ideas & Speculations

      How does pheomelanin synthesis contribute to melanomagenesis? : Two distinct mechanisms could explain the carcinogenicity of pheomelanin synthesis (pages 672–676)

      Ann M. Morgan, Jennifer Lo and David E. Fisher

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300020

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      Pheomelanin synthesis is associated with melanoma formation, but the mechanism has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that pheomelanin promotes formation of genotoxic reactive oxygen species, and/or that pheomelanin synthesis consumes cellular glutathione stores.

  7. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea revisited
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Correspondence
    10. Next Issue
    11. Corrigendum
    1. Recently in press

      Stopped in its tracks: Negative regulation of the dynein motor by the yeast protein She1 (pages 677–682)

      Jeffrey K. Moore

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300016

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      Dynein motors power transport in a variety of cellular contexts. Transport is controlled by regulators that influence dynein motility and cargo-binding. Recent studies from budding yeast identify a novel dynein regulator, She1, which regulates dynein by blocking the recruitment of dynactin and inhibiting dynein motility along microtubules.

    2. Social supergenes of superorganisms: Do supergenes play important roles in social evolution? (pages 683–689)

      Timothy A. Linksvayer, Jeremiah W. Busch and Chris R. Smith

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300038

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      We discuss how supergenes, sets of co-inherited genes, affecting key traits in insect societies may underlie the evolution of phenomena such as genetic caste determination and social parasitism. The first social supergene, affecting fire ant social organization, was recently discovered.

    3. Phenotypes from ancient DNA: Approaches, insights and prospects (pages 690–695)

      Gloria G. Fortes, Camilla F. Speller, Michael Hofreiter and Turi E. King

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300036

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      With the recent advances in forensic and ancient DNA (aDNA) technologies, it is now possible to determine phenotypic traits from SNPs typed from aDNA. (Thanks to Carl Vivian for the picture of the bones and Johanna Paijmans for the DNA figure.)

    4. Review essays

      Evolutionary systems biology: What it is and why it matters (pages 696–705)

      Orkun S. Soyer and Maureen A. O'Malley

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300029

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      Evolutionary systems biology (ESB) generates multilevel mechanistic and evolutionary understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. By combining mathematical, molecular, and cellular approaches to evolution, ESB generalizes network knowledge across species, predicts mutational effects, and defines the core network structures and dynamics that have evolved to cause intracellular and intercellular responses.

    5. Cooperation and the evolutionary ecology of bacterial virulence: The Bacillus cereus group as a novel study system (pages 706–716)

      Ben Raymond and Michael B. Bonsall

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300028

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      The major virulence factors of the B. cereus group are secreted extra-cellularly. Social conflict between producers and cheats should increase with the metabolic cost and spatial scale of action of virulence factors. We discuss the likely restrictions on cheater fitness and the behavioural ecology of public and private secretion.

    6. Evolution of sex differences in lifespan and aging: Causes and constraints (pages 717–724)

      Alexei A. Maklakov and Virpi Lummaa

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Why do sexes have different lifespans and aging rates? Sexes resolve the fundamental tradeoff between reproduction and survival differently and relationship between lifespan and fitness differs between males and females. However, selection for sex-specific values is constrained by intersexual genetic correlations resulting in intra-locus sexual conflict over optimal lifespan.

    7. Problems & Paradigms

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Both cell-autonomous mechanisms and hormones contribute to sexual development in vertebrates and insects (pages 725–732)

      Ashley Bear and Antónia Monteiro

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent research has shown that the development of male and female traits in insects, birds, and mammals depends on both hormones and on the cell-autonomous expression of the sex determination pathway in somatic cells. This new research challenges traditional views of sexual development in birds, mammals, and insects.

    8. How does SHIP1/2 balance PtdIns(3,4)P2 and does it signal independently of its phosphatase activity? (pages 733–743)

      Jingwei Xie, Christophe Erneux and Isabelle Pirson

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200168

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      PtdIns(3,4)P2 (a SHIP1/2 product) is involved in cellular adhesion, migration, and cytoskeletal organization. SHIP2 docking properties, besides its 5-phosphatase activity, help in its recruitment to subcellular compartments where PtdIns(3,4)P2 is then produced. We discuss the involvement of SHIP2 (as a phosphatase* or a scaffold protein) in cytoskeletal dynamics and receptors endocytosis.

    9. Methods, Models & Techniques

      Mastering methodological pitfalls for surviving the metagenomic jungle (pages 744–754)

      Tom O. Delmont, Pascal Simonet and Timothy M. Vogel

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201200155

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metagenomics is a powerful approach targeting environmental nucleic diversity but represents also a methodological jungle where pitfalls are challenging when quantitative observations are desired. Here we describe the effect of critical parameters (especially DNA extraction and annotation stringency) required to represent microbial communities function and structure in the metagenomic era.

  8. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea revisited
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Correspondence
    10. Next Issue
    11. Corrigendum
  9. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea revisited
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Correspondence
    10. Next Issue
    11. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Article first published online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370086

  10. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Idea revisited
    7. Insights & Perspectives
    8. Prospects & Overviews
    9. Correspondence
    10. Next Issue
    11. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum (page 756)

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370085

      This article corrects:

      Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate: The Golgi and beyond

      Vol. 35, Issue 7, 612–622, Article first published online: 27 MAY 2013

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