BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 36 Issue 3

March 2014

Volume 36, Issue 3

Pages 221–329

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 3∕2014

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370031

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      The cord-to-tube transition. The assembly of blood vessels in the vertebrate embryo requires a series of coordinated steps, amongst them lumen formation. On pages 251–259, Charpentier and Conlon review the most recent data on the diverse mechanisms by which vascular lumens arise, as well as the molecular and cellular players that contribute to this complex process. The cover depicts the inherent heterogeneity of blood vessel structure, which can be made up of both unicellular (represented by pink and blue colored cells) as well as multicellular (represented by green/yellow and red/brown colored cells) tubes. Remodeling of this cellular architecture is critical as new vessels form and new vascular connections are made.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 3∕2014

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370032

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Next Issue
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  4. Contents and highlights of this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays 3∕2014 (pages 224–225)

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370033

  5. Insights & Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Next Issue
    1. Think again

      From the selfish gene to selfish metabolism: Revisiting the central dogma (pages 226–235)

      Víctor de Lorenzo

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300153

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      The central dogma of Molecular Biology has shortcomings that need revision: (i) metabolism is the next step of the information flow, (ii) metabolism has the predominant role (thereby the hierarchy of actors should be flipped upside down) and (iii) metabolism feedbacks on DNA by means of reactive oxygen species.

  6. Prospects & Overviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Next Issue
    1. Recently in press

      The functional consequences of intron retention: Alternative splicing coupled to NMD as a regulator of gene expression (pages 236–243)

      Ying Ge and Bo T. Porse

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300156

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      The excision of introns may be affected by different mechanisms, which all lead to the retention of an intron in the final mRNA. As demonstrated in recent reports, intron retention is employed not only to regulate gene expression output but is also found to be deregulated in disease.

    2. Evolution of adaptive immunity: Implications of a third lymphocyte lineage in lampreys (pages 244–250)

      Natsuko Kishishita and Fumikiyo Nagawa

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300145

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      Hirano et al. showed that the antigen receptor VLRC is expressed on a third lymphocyte lineage, which may be equivalent to the γδ T-cell lineage. The existence of three major lymphocyte lineages and their development patterns suggest that these cell lineages were present in the common vertebrate ancestor approximately 500 million years ago.

    3. Review essays

      Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying blood vessel lumen formation (pages 251–259)

      Marta S. Charpentier and Frank L. Conlon

      Version of Record online: 9 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300133

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      During blood vessel development, endothelial cells first coalesce into cord-like structures that must transition into tubes containing a central lumen in order to become functional transporters of blood throughout the body. The diverse mechanisms by which vessels form lumens will be discussed in the following review.

    4. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate: A nuclear stress lipid and a tuner of membranes and cytoskeleton dynamics (pages 260–272)

      Julien Viaud, Frédéric Boal, Hélène Tronchère, Frédérique Gaits-Iacovoni and Bernard Payrastre

      Version of Record online: 21 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300132

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      Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate (PtdIns5P), through the dynamic localization of lipid kinases and phosphatases, can be found in distinct sub-cellular compartments. PtdIns5P recruits effector proteins mediating specific cellular functions such as trafficking, cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics, and intranuclear processes.

    5. Problems & Paradigms

      Do all creatures possess an acquired immune system of some sort? (pages 273–281)

      Jacob Rimer, Irun R. Cohen and Nir Friedman

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300124

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      We propose that all organisms express both innate and adaptive/acquired immunity. Acquired immune manifestations vary between species, but all use recognition molecules not directly encoded in the inherited genome, and all serve a similar function – allowing individuals to learn from their own immune experience, thus promoting species survival.

    6. Aging genomes: A necessary evil in the logic of life (pages 282–292)

      Jan Vijg

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300127

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      DNA damage has since long been suspected to be a major cause of aging. Here, I will discuss the dual role of genome maintenance systems in providing DNA sequence variation in the germline as the substrate for evolution and mediating DNA damage-induced aging phenotypes in the soma.

    7. Distinct mechanisms determine organ left-right asymmetry patterning in an uncoupled way (pages 293–304)

      Sizhou Huang, Wenming Xu, Bingyin Su and Lingfei Luo

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300128

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      Based on the fact that distinct mechanisms determine different organ left-right (LR) patterning in an uncoupled way, we hypothesize that other critical factors in the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) may coordinate with Nodal to regulate heart LR asymmetry patterning during LR patterning, and this can be evaluated by our proposed model.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Circadian rhythms and mood: Opportunities for multi-level analyses in genomics and neuroscience : Circadian rhythm dysregulation in mood disorders provides clues to the brain's organizing principles, and a touchstone for genomics and neuroscience (pages 305–315)

      Jun Z. Li

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300141

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      To understand the link between circadian rhythm regulation and mood disorders requires unification of data and tools across multiple levels of inquiry, from DNA variation, cellular pathways, neural circuits, their dynamics and plasticity, to behavioral outcomes. The circadian-mood connection provides an exceptional opportunity to pursue cross-level integrated analyses.

    9. Metagenomic insights into the human gut resistome and the forces that shape it (pages 316–329)

      Kristoffer Forslund, Shinichi Sunagawa, Luis P. Coelho and Peer Bork

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201300143

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      Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is growing. Opinions diverge regarding to what extent our policies enable this. Metagenomics allow new insights into the question. Available data show large differences between countries in resistance potential of human gut microbes, consistent with statistics of antibiotic use in food production and medicine.

  7. Next Issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents and highlights of this issue
    6. Insights & Perspectives
    7. Prospects & Overviews
    8. Next Issue
    1. You have free access to this content
      BioEssays – Next Issue

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/bies.201370034

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