Luminescence

Cover image for Vol. 26 Issue 1

January/February 2011

Volume 26, Issue 1

Pages i–i, 1–76

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Feature Pages
    4. Special Feature: Review Articles
    5. Research Articles
    6. Short Communications
    7. Errata
    1. Based on a review of the data, use of the term ‘cypridinid’ solves the Cypridina/Vargula dilemma for naming the constituents of the luminescent system of ostracods in the family cypridinidae

      James G. Morin

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bio.1288

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This issue's featured article; Based on a review of the data, use of the term ‘cypridinid’ solves the Cypridina/Vargula dilemma for naming the constituents of the luminescent system of ostracods in the family Cypridinidae is authored by Jim Morin of Cornell University.

  2. Feature Pages

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Feature Pages
    4. Special Feature: Review Articles
    5. Research Articles
    6. Short Communications
    7. Errata
    1. Based on a review of the data, use of the term ‘cypridinid’ solves the Cypridina/Vargula dilemma for naming the constituents of the luminescent system of ostracods in the family Cypridinidae (page i)

      James G. Morin

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/bio.1282

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover graphic indicates the evolutionary relationships among the luminescent and non-luminescent species within the well-known cypridinid ostracods including the Japanese species Vargula hilgendorfii, formerly known as Cypridina hilgendorfii, from which the components of this luminescent system were identified, including the cypridinid luciferin shown in the upper left. Because all luminescent members of the clade use the same basic components, to avoid confusion, it is most parsimonious to use the term ‘cypridinid’ rather than generic designations. Based on the phylogeny it can be inferred that luminescence first evolved as a predator deterrent and secondarily, but only in the Caribbean, as courtship signals. Only about half the species in the family are luminescent. Of the luminescent species, all probably use their light to deter predators while about half (the Caribbean species) also use their light in sexual reproduction. The family includes three recently described new luminescent genera and at least four undescribed luminescent genera (and probably several more). Several species (A-F) are shown on the right including: A: Kornickeria n. sp.; B. H-Group (new undescribed genus) n. sp.; C. Photeros morini; D. ‘Vargula’hilgendorfii (note: this species belongs in a new undescribed genus separate from both Vargula and Cypridina); E. Cypridina dentata and F. Skogsbergia lerneri (a non-luminescent species). See cited references 11–13 and references therein for details.

  3. Special Feature: Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Feature Pages
    4. Special Feature: Review Articles
    5. Research Articles
    6. Short Communications
    7. Errata
  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Feature Pages
    4. Special Feature: Review Articles
    5. Research Articles
    6. Short Communications
    7. Errata
    1. An ethyl acetate sensor utilizing cataluminescence on Y2O3 nanoparticles (pages 5–9)

      Xiaoan Cao, Ying Tao, Liling Li, Yonghui Liu, Yan Peng and Jinwen Li

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/bio.1174

    2. Free radical scavenging abilities of flavonyl-thiazolidine-2,4-dione compounds (pages 10–16)

      Oya Bozdağ-Dündar, Rahmiye Ertan, Hassan Y. Aboul-Enein, Aleksandra Kładna and Irena Kruk

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/bio.1176

    3. A dissolved oxygen sensor based on composite fluorinated xerogel doped with platinum porphyrin dye (pages 29–34)

      Yun Zhao, Tingxiu Ye, Haixu Chen, Dapeng Huang, Tingyao Zhou, Chunyan He and Xi Chen

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/bio.1182

  5. Short Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Feature Pages
    4. Special Feature: Review Articles
    5. Research Articles
    6. Short Communications
    7. Errata
    1. A rapid and simple chemiluminescence method for screening levels of inosine and hypoxanthine in non-traumatic chest pain patients (pages 65–75)

      Don E. Farthing, Domenic Sica, Michael Hindle, Les Edinboro, Lei Xi, Todd W.B. Gehr, Lynne Gehr, Christine A. Farthing, Terri L. Larus, Itaf Fakhry and H. Thomas Karnes

      Article first published online: 16 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/bio.1187

  6. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Feature Pages
    4. Special Feature: Review Articles
    5. Research Articles
    6. Short Communications
    7. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum: Lie group analyses of pattern formation of Gurken distribution in Drosophila oogenesis (page 76)

      Ruo-Rung Huang, Pei-Yu Wang, Wei-Chieh Lin, Chia-Hui Fang, Jen-Cheng Wang, Jui-Ching Cheng, Xin-Hong Qian, Liann-Be Chang, Lih-Gen Sheu, Li-Mei Pai and Tzer-En Nee

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/bio.1262

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