A comparative study into alterations of coenzyme Q redox status in ageing pigs, mice, and worms

Authors

  • Simone Onur,

    1. Division of Molecular Prevention, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Petra Niklowitz,

    1. Children's Hospital of Datteln, University of Witten/Herdecke, Datteln, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Alexandra Fischer,

    1. Division of Molecular Prevention, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Cornelia C. Metges,

    1. Institute of Nutritional Physiology “Oskar Kellner,” Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology (FBN), Dummerstorf, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Tilman Grune,

    1. Department of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute of Nutrition, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Thomas Menke,

    1. Children's Hospital of Datteln, University of Witten/Herdecke, Datteln, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Gerald Rimbach,

    1. Division of Food Science, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Frank Döring

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Molecular Prevention, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel, Germany
    • Address for correspondence: Prof. Dr. Frank Döring, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Division of Molecular Prevention, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, Heinrich-Hecht-Platz 10, 24118 Kiel, Germany Tel. +49 431 8805657; Fax +49 431 8805658; E-mail: sek@molprev.uni-kiel.de

    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Coenzyme Q derivatives (CoQ) are lipid soluble antioxidants that are synthesized endogenously in almost all species and function as an obligatory cofactor of the respiratory chain. There is evidence that CoQ status is altered by age in several species. Here we determined level and redox-state of CoQ in different age groups of pigs, mice and Caenorhabditis elegans. Since these species are very different with respect to lifespan, reproduction and physiology, our approach could provide some general tendencies of CoQ status in ageing organisms. We found that CoQ level decreases with age in pigs and mice, whereas CoQ content increases in older worms. As observed in all three species, ubiquinone, the oxidized form of CoQ, increases with age. Additionally, we were able to show that supplementation of ubiquinol-10, the reduced form of human CoQ10, slightly increases lifespan of post-reproductive worms. In conclusion, the percentage of the oxidized form of CoQ increases with age indicating higher oxidative stress or rather a decreased anti-oxidative capacity of aged animals. © 2014 BioFactors, 40(3):346–354, 2014

Ancillary