In vivo protective effects of dietary curcumin and capsaicin against alcohol-induced oxidative stress

Authors

  • Chang-Won Pyun,

    1. Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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    • The first author (C. W. Pyun) contributed mostly to the experimental part of this work.

  • Ji-Han Kim,

    1. Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Kyu-Ho Han,

    1. Department of Food Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido, Japan
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  • Go-Eun Hong,

    1. Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Chi-Ho Lee

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
    • Address for correspondence: Prof. Chi-Ho Lee, Ph.D.; Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul, 143–701, Korea. Tel.: +8224 503 681; Fax: +8224 53 19 48; E-mail: leech@konkuk.ac.kr.

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  • Disclosure: There is no conflict of interest.

Abstract

BALB/c mice were exposed to chronic alcohol-induced oxidative stress by intragastric administration of excessive ethanol (5 g/kg body weight) during the 24-week period. Curcumin (0.016%) or capsaicin (0.014%) containing diets were fed with or without ethanol treatment in four groups. There was no statistically significant difference in the behavioral test between all groups during the experimental period. Only one alcohol-treated mouse fed a normal diet showed a behavioral disorder and died before the raising period was completed. There were no effects on the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in the brain. However, curcumin or capsaicin treatment prevented alcohol-induced decline in brain weight. Furthermore, the levels of malondialdehyde and phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide were significantly reduced in the brain tissue extract. The findings of this study demonstrated and confirmed the antioxidant effect of curcumin and capsaicin against alcohol-induced oxidative stress, and they suggest a direction for further studies. © 2014 BioFactors, 40(5):494–500, 2014

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