Chaga mushroom extract inhibits oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes as assessed by comet assay

Authors

  • Yoo Kyoung Park,

    1. Department of Medical Nutrition, Kyunghee University, 1 Hoekidong, Dongdaemoonku, Seoul 130–701, South Korea
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work

  • Hyang Burm Lee,

    1. Department of Food and Nutrition, Hannam University, 133 Ojeong-dong, Daedeok-gu, Daejeon 306–791, Korea
    2. School of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151–742, Korea
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work

  • Eun-Jae Jeon,

    1. Department of Medical Nutrition, Kyunghee University, 1 Hoekidong, Dongdaemoonku, Seoul 130–701, South Korea
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  • Hack Sung Jung,

    1. Seson Biotech, Daejeon 305–710, Korea
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  • Myung-Hee Kang

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medical Nutrition, Kyunghee University, 1 Hoekidong, Dongdaemoonku, Seoul 130–701, South Korea
    • Department of Medical Nutrition, Kyunghee University, 1 Hoekidong, Dongdaemoonku, Seoul 130–701, South Korea. Tel.: +82 42 629 7491
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Abstract

The Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) is claimed to have beneficial properties for human health, such as anti-bacterial, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The antioxidant effects of the mushroom may be partly explained by protection of cell components against free radicals. We evaluated the effect of aqueous Chaga mushroom extracts for their potential for protecting against oxidative damage to DNA in human lymphocytes. Cells were pretreated with various concentrations (10, 50, 100 and 500 μ/mL) of the extract for 1 h at 37°C. Cells were then treated with 100 μM of H2O2 for 5∼min as an oxidative stress. Evaluation of oxidative damage was performed using single-cell gel electrophoresis for DNA fragmentation (Comet assay). Using image analysis, the degree of DNA damage was evaluated as the DNA tail moment. Cells pretreated with Chaga extract showed over 40% reduction in DNA fragmentation compared with the positive control (100 μmol H2O2 treatment). Thus, Chaga mushroom treatment affords cellular protection against endogenous DNA damage produced by H2O2.

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