Carbohydrate metabolic pathway genes associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) for obesity and type 2 diabetes: Identification by data mining

Authors

  • Dr. Vijayalakshmi Varma,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR, USA
    • Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Centre of Toxicological Research, FDA, HFT-020, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR, USA, Fax: +1-870-543-7676
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  • Carolyn Wise,

    1. Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR, USA
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  • Jim Kaput

    1. Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR, USA
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Abstract

Increasing consumption of refined carbohydrates is now being recognized as a primary contributor to the development of nutritionally related chronic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A data mining approach was used to evaluate the role of carbohydrate metabolic pathway genes in the development of obesity and T2DM. Data from public databases were used to map the position of the carbohydrate metabolic pathway genes to known quantitative trait loci (QTL) for obesity and T2DM and for examining the pathway genes for the presence of sequence and structural genetic variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variants (CNS), respectively. The results demonstrated that a majority of the genes of the carbohydrate metabolic pathways are associated with QTL for obesity and many for T2DM. In addition, some key genes of the pathways also encode non-synonymous SNPs that exhibit significant differences in population frequencies. This study emphasizes the significance of the metabolic pathways genes in the development of disease phenotypes, its differential occurrence across populations and between individuals, and a strategy for interpreting an individuals' risk for disease.

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