Haloalkane dehalogenases: Biotechnological applications

Authors

  • Tana Koudelakova,

    1. Loschmidt Laboratories, Department of Experimental Biology and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic
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  • Sarka Bidmanova,

    1. Loschmidt Laboratories, Department of Experimental Biology and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic
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  • Pavel Dvorak,

    1. Loschmidt Laboratories, Department of Experimental Biology and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic
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  • Antonin Pavelka,

    1. Loschmidt Laboratories, Department of Experimental Biology and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic
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  • Radka Chaloupkova,

    1. Loschmidt Laboratories, Department of Experimental Biology and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic
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  • Zbynek Prokop,

    1. Loschmidt Laboratories, Department of Experimental Biology and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic
    2. Enantis Ltd., Brno, Czech Republic
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  • Prof. Jiri Damborsky

    Corresponding author
    1. Loschmidt Laboratories, Department of Experimental Biology and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic
    • Loschmidt Laboratories, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5/A13, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic
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  • We dedicate this paper to the founder of this field, our mentor and friend, Professor Dick B. Janssen from the Groningen University.

Abstract

Haloalkane dehalogenases (EC 3.8.1.5, HLDs) are α/β-hydrolases which act to cleave carbon-halogen bonds. Due to their unique catalytic mechanism, broad substrate specificity and high robustness, the members of this enzyme family have been employed in several practical applications: (i) biocatalytic preparation of optically pure building-blocks for organic synthesis; (ii) recycling of by-products from chemical processes; (iii) bioremediation of toxic environmental pollutants; (iv) decontamination of warfare agents; (v) biosensing of environmental pollutants; and (vi) protein tagging for cell imaging and protein analysis. This review discusses the application of HLDs in the context of the biochemical properties of individual enzymes. Further extension of HLD uses within the field of biotechnology will require currently limiting factors – such as low expression, product inhibition, insufficient enzyme selectivity, low affinity and catalytic efficiency towards selected substrates, and instability in the presence of organic co-solvents – to be overcome. We propose that strategies based on protein engineering and isolation of novel HLDs from extremophilic microorganisms may offer solutions.

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