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Silk-based tissue engineering support

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  2. Silk-based tissue engineering support
  3. Functionalized polyester with microgel
  4. Eco-friendly jeans production

Ghezzi et al., Biotechnol. J. 2011, 6, 1198–1207.

To engineer complex tissues, cells need to be incorporated into multilayed 3D scaffolds. These should not only be biocompatible, but also match the mechanical and degradation properties of the specific application. In this issue, authors from McGill University (Montreal, Canada) report a three-layered scaffold consisting of an electrospun silk fibroin (SF) mat sandwiched between two dense collagen (DC) layers. The SF layer confers enhanced mechanical properties, while the DC layers create an extracellular matrix-like environment for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) growth. This easy technique to fabricate multilayered tissue engineering supports can be used for the regeneration of complex tissues, such as skin, or central nervous system dura mater.

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Functionalized polyester with microgel

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  2. Silk-based tissue engineering support
  3. Functionalized polyester with microgel
  4. Eco-friendly jeans production

Glampedaki et al., Biotechnol. J. 2011, 6, 1219–1229.

All functionalization procedures of polyester textiles face the same challenge: how to functionalize a material with very low chemical reactivity? In this issue, researchers from the University of Twente, The Netherlands, propose a microgel-based functionalization method applicable to polyester textiles for improving their hydrophilicity and/or moisture-management properties, aiming to enhance wear comfort. The described method includes two steps: (i) primary amine groups are created on polyester surfaces using ethylenediamine; (ii) biopolymer-based polyelectrolyte microgels are incorporated using the natural cross-linker genipin. Advantages of this new technique are the extended pH responsiveness of the polyester surface as well as thermoresponsiveness at a temperature close to the average human body temperature, which creates new applications for functionalized polyester in biomedicine and protective clothing.

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Eco-friendly jeans production

  1. Top of page
  2. Silk-based tissue engineering support
  3. Functionalized polyester with microgel
  4. Eco-friendly jeans production

Schimper et al., Biotechnol. J. 2011, 6, 1280–1285.

A central step in the processing of blue jeans is the wash and bleach processes used to create a worn or torn look. In this issue, Thomas Bechthold and co-workers from the University of Innsbruck, Austria, report a chemical surface activation technique followed by cellulase treatment which offers an alternative to the dangerous, and internationally banned, sandblasting technique. The authors use indigo-dyed fabrics made from regenerated cellulose fibers and treat them with a concentrated NaOH-containing paste followed by inclubation with cellulase. Wash-down experiments demonstrate significant and targeted color removal from the activated surface. The described method presents several advantages including maintenance of fabric strength, shortening the duration of the wash-down process and reducing the amount of costly chemicals used.

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