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Editors: Judy Peng /jp; Uta Göbel /ug; Lucie Kalvodova /lk

E-mail: biotecvisions@wiley.com

Contributors: Allison Goldstein /ag; Barbara Janssens /bj; Bill Mullen /bm; Frances Harding /fh; Gillian van Beest /gvb; Joanna Cipolla /gc; Lotte Nielsen /ln; Luaine Bandounas /lb; Meghana Hemphill /mh; Vivian Killet /vk

Newsletter sign-up: http://goo.gl/aV5k8

Current events

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

World Congress on Biotechnology

May 4–6, 2012, Hyderabad, India.

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Biotechnology has great potential in addressing the needs of our ever-expanding population. Cellulosic biofuels, environmental remediation, functional foods, biopharmaceuticals are some of the solutions that would contribute to sustainable growth, all of which involve biotechnology.

India too is facing many of the same challenges as the rest of the world – Biotechnology Journal has discussed various aspects of biotechnology with relation to India in a Special Issue in 2009. In this issue of BiotecVisions, on the occasion of the World Congress on Biotechnology, held in Hyderabad, India, we provide highlights of the latest reports in biotechnology with a focus on India and its progress in biotechnology. /jp

Bioinformatics Career Day

May 24, 2012, HD, Germany

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Are you an early-career scientist? Considering a career in bioinformatics? The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the DKFZ (German Cancer Research Center) are jointly hosting a Bioinformatics Career Day on May 24 at the DKFZ in Heidelberg, Germany. Find out what career opportunities are available in this interdisciplinary science. Scientists from the EBI, DKFZ, EMBL, Novartis, Genomatix and Molecular Health GmbH will share their stories about their current roles and career paths in bioinformatics. /bj

PhD-careers@dkfz.de

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Getting published

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Selling your paper: Graphical abstracts

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Pictures can say a lot more than words. This is also true for scientific data, regardless whether you are presenting them in a lab meeting, at a conference or in a publication. It is important to “sell” the data to others and to present them in a way that they are easy to understand and that the take-home message is very clear.

Some journals, including the BiotecVisions contributors Biotechnology Journal, BioEssays and Biotechnology & Bioengineering are now asking authors to provide “graphical abstracts” , which includes a graphical summary of the paper and a short text that is accessible to the general educated audience.

Just as with writing a good scientific paper, it is critical that one has the relevant take-home message in mind before starting to put something on “paper”. Here are some tips on how to provide a good graphical abstract:

Think:

– What are the most important results?

– Why should someone read the paper? What is the aim?

– What is the (possible) application?

Draw:

– Picture the most important results in a simplified way and connect them by arrows e.g. in- put [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] method [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] output

– Use as few words as possible

– Make it visually appealing, e.g. not too many different colors

Write:

– Summarize the most important points in three sentences

– 1. Define the problem

– 2. Results of current study

– 3. Implications of study in relation to the problem

All phrased in a way that a general audience can appreciate the message

See previous articles in BiotecVisions on how to write an abstract and presenting your data in figures:

Uta Göbel is Assistant Editor for Biotechnology Journal and also works for Engineering in Life Sciences and edits BiotecVisions.

Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Biofuel initiatives in India have gained momentum with the national biofuel policy targeting 20% blending of both petrol and diesel by 2017. Most of India's biofuel plans revolve around using sugarcane for bioethanol and jatropha for biodiesel production. This study, taking the southern Indian state of Karnataka as an example, aims at estimating the potential to achieve policy targets. The study spatially analyses land-use change owing to biofuel expansion and its effects on food production. The authors use an integrated modelling framework to simulate land-use change and bioenergy production under two scenarios – Industrial Economy (IE) and Agricultural Economy (AE). Results indicate that meeting the 20% blending target is a challenging goal to achieve under both scenarios. /jc [1]

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Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Curcumin, a derivative of the spice tumeric, has been reported to possess pharmacological properties that aid would healing. Yuvarani and colleagues describe the creation of a novel biomaterial consisting of a chitosan-alginate biopolymer blend coated with curcumin paste. The chitosan-alginate blend itself possesses characteristics that would predict faster wound healing and prevention of both scarring and wound infection. When coated with curcumin paste, the material further accelerates wound closure in a rat model. /fh [2]

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Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Approximately one-third of the world's population has latent tuberculosis (TB), a condition in which tubercle bacilli reside in a dormant-like state for indefinite periods of time. The clearing of dormant organisms is a prerequisite for the eradication of TB in the community. Dormancy adaptation of tubercle bacteria is associated with the development of an altered physiological state in which they are more resistant to any currently available antitubercular drugs. DevR is a key regulator of the dormancy response in M. tuberculosis. In this study, using DevR as bait to screen a phage display library, a peptide, DevRS1, was obtained. DevRS1 inhibits DevR-regulated survival of non-replicating tubercle bacilli in a hypoxia model of dormancy. Such peptide holds promise for developing molecules effective against dormant bacteria. /lb [3]

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Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Attempts to control tuberculosis (TB) have proved difficult owing to our poor understanding of the pathobiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the emergence of strains that are resistant to multiple drugs currently available for treatment. Genome-wide expression profiling has provided new insight into the transcriptome signatures of the bacterium during infection, notably of macrophages and dendritic cells. These data indicate that M. tuberculosis expresses numerous genes to evade the host immune responses, to suit its intracellular life style, and to respond to various antibiotic drugs. Among the intracellularly induced genes, several have functions in lipid metabolism, cell wall synthesis, iron uptake, oxidative stress resistance, protein secretion, or inhibition of apoptosis. This review examines these findings and discusses possible ways to understand the complex etiology of TB and to find new effective drug targets. /gvb [4]

Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Hot spots are regions of frequent mutation within a genome. It is important to understand where hot spots fall when designing vaccines or investigating drug targets. In a recent report, Das et al. develop an approach to map regions of high variability within whole ge nome sequences based on Shewhart Control Charts – a technique used in quality control and estimation. They then apply the technique to analyze strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using this strategy, specific genes associated with drug resistance are mapped to hot spot regions, pinpointing the likely molecular origin of drug resistance in this disease and allowing strategies to circumvent this problem to be formulated. /fh [5]

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Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Small scale batch cultures are often used to screen candidate clones for high protein expression during cell line development. At full production scale, however, fermentation is rarely carried out under batch conditions: fed batch or perfusion are used to optimize cell and protein yield. Differences in cell behavior under each feeding regime can make it difficult to be sure the best clone for production is selected under the conditions of the initial screen. The recent innovative development of a hydrogel-based nutrient delivery system allows continuous feeding of nutrients in scaled down systems such as shake flasks. This technology allows nutrient concentrations to be kept at consistent levels, more closely replicating feeding strategies used at large scale. /fh [6]

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Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Biofilm formation in central venous catheters (CVC) is a pre-requisite for catheter-related blood stream infection. The catheter lock technique has been used to treat biofilm infection, but the ideal agent, concentration, and the minimum exposure time necessary to eradicate the biofilms is not clearly known. In this study, the authors use biofilm-producing strains of staphylococci to determine the minimum biofilm eradication concentration of ethanol compared to conventional antibacterial agents, including eight representative methicillin-resistant staphylococci, from colonized CVCs. The bio films were exposed to three antibiotics: gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and vancomycin, which were unable to eradicate the biofilms, while ethanol at 40% concentration could do so for all the isolates. This study highlights the efficacy and rationale of using 40% ethanol for a short period and thus to prevent catheter-related blood stream infection. /gvb [7]

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Bacteria in the gut of house flies

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

House flies (Musca domestica L.) are cosmopolitan, ubiquitous, synanthropic insects that serve as mechanical or biological vectors for various microorganisms. To fully assess the role of house flies in the epidemiology of human diseases, it is essential to understand the diversity of microbiota harbored by natural fly populations. In this study, the authors aim to identify the diversity of house fly gut bacteria by both culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. A total of 102 bacterial strains were isolated from the gut of 65 house flies collected from various public places including a garden, public park, garbage/dump area, public toilet, hospital, restaurant/canteen, mutton shop/market, and house/human habitation. Molecular phylogenetic analyses placed these isolates into 22 different genera. The majority of bacteria identified were known potential path ogens of the genera Klebsiella, Aero monas, Shigella, Morganella, Providencia, and Staphylococcus. /ln [8]

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Stress tolerance of rice plants

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Rice yield is greatly affected by environmental stresses such as drought and salinity. In response to the challenge of producing rice plants tolerant to these stresses, the authors of this article introduce cDNA encoding the transcription factors DREB1A and DREB1B under the control of the stress inducible rd29 promoter. Salinity tolerance was assayed in very young seedlings. Drought stress tests were found to be more reliable when they were carried out at the pre-flowering booting stage. The authors examie the agronomic performance of stressed and unstressed plants to compare the yield losses due to dehydration and salt-loading stresses. Noticeably, the authors report enhanced tolerance to dehydration in the plants transformed with DREB1A isolated from Arabidopsis while DREB1B is more effective for salt tolerance. /jc [9]

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Disease resistance in maize

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Plants have evolved an extensive array of methodologies to cope with invading pathogens. Genes that are associated with resistance to pathogens are extremely diverse and are referred to as “R-genes”. R-genes follow various mechanisms to defend plants, including PAMP (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) -induced defenses. Recent studies use powerful technologies of modern molecular biology, such as genomic and proteomic tools to dissever resistance pathways. These can be used to improve the genetic make-up of plants to make them more pathogen resistant. This review discusses the basic terminologies used in disease resistance of crop plants and focusses on resistance in maize. /jc [10]

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Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Lutein is a carotenoid from the family of xanthophylls. It is synthesized only by plants but it accumulates in animal tissues and products such as eggs when taken up from food. Lutein protects the eye retina from blue light, and sufficient dietary intake is necessary for healthy eyes. Gorusupudi and Vallikannan from Mysore, Karnataka, India report that ingesting lutein together with glycolipids from germinated wheat greatly improved lutein absorption from the intestine. In addition, more lutein accumulated in the retina of mice fed lutein with glycolipids than when lutein was supplied on its own. /lk [11]

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Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

This article comments on study demonstrating that bacterial autolysis, and extracellular DNA (eDNA) thereby released, contributes to the en-hanced biofilm-formation by vancomycin nonsusceptible Staphylococcus aureus (VNSSA) upon exposure to sublethal vancomycin concentration. The results suggest an important clinical concern that the use of cell wall-active agents, in particular, exposing S. aureus to sublethal doses, may enhance biofilm formation. Given the importance of bio film phenotypes in persistent bacteremia and endocarditis, these findings indirectly challenge the use of vancomycin in these serious infections. /gvb [12]

Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

A variety of microorganisms live at high temperatures under stressed conditions. A bacterial strain highly resistant to chromate was isolated from the sediments of a hot spring in Tantloi, Jharkhand, India at 65�C. The strain showed 98% 16S rRNA gene sequence similari- ty with Anoxybacillus kualawohkensis strain KW12 and was found to grow optimally at 37 �C. Biochemical and proteomic approaches were used to correlate chromate reduction activity with heat stress. Several proteins showed changed expression levels as a result of heat stress. The upregulated set included proteins involved in cellular metabolism of sugar, nucleotide, amino acids, lipids and vitamins, oxidoreductase activity, and protein folding. /lb [13]

Special Issue

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES

Lipids in functional foods, nutraceuticals, and supplements

Instant soup powder enriched with omega-3 fatty acids, milk enhanced with fish oil, fermented foods with superior conjugated linoleic and linolenic acids content: these are three examples of the so-called functional foods – tailored to be healthier than the common products – covered in the April issue of the European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology.

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This Special Issue focuses on new sources of “bioactive” lipids with health beneficial properties that can be used to improve the value of regular or low quality foods, and on innovative technological approaches to enhance the analysis, extraction procedures or to enrich the nutritional profile of traditional foods. /lk

Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
  26. REFERENCES
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This review by Bisht and Maitra from the University of Delhi focuses on the progress of targeted delivery of doxorubicin, a nanoparticulated anticancer drug, chemically conjugated with dextran and encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles. This combination can be delivered to solid tumors with reduced side effects for the patient, including reduced cardiotoxicity. Regulated particle size and long circulation of these hydrogel nanoparticles in the blood help them accumulate in tumor tissue through the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, as evidenced from the significant regression of tumor volume. /mh [14]

Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb

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  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
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  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
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This review from the National Centre for Biological Sciences at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Bangalore focuses on olfactory representations in the first stage of the olfactory pathway, the olfactory bulb. The authors examine the diverging viewpoints on spatially organized versus distributed representations and consider how odor sampling through respiration is a key part of the odorant code. Finally, they ask how the bulb handles the challenging task of representing mixtures. /mh [15]

3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”

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  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
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Organized by the Würzburg Initiative Tissue Engineering (WITE e.V.), this conference (May 23–25, 2012, Würzburg, Germany) brings together researchers from various fields of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine including the translational aspects of advanced therapies. “We would like to extend a warm welcome to all” – Heike Walles and Ulrich Nöth

In addition to a Special Issue on “Strategies in Tissue Engineering” (guest editors: Prof. Heike Walles and Prof. Katja Schenke-Layland), Biotechnology Journal has compiled an online “virtual issue” of articles addressing various aspects of tissue engineering. /jp

BiotecEvents

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  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
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Advertorial: Vaccine Production Summit and Single-Use Applications

June 04–06, 2012, The Westin San Francisco Market Street, San Francisco, CA

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IBC's Vaccine Production Summit, com bined with the co-located Single-Use Applications for Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing conference, is the perfect opportunity for you to hear how other companies have solved common process development and manufacturing challenges.

IBC's Single-Use Applications for Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing conference offers solutions toward better industry cooperation in standards harmonization and downstream processing, plus new applications for single-use in fill/finish, bulk storage etc. through a series of case studies, panel discussions, point-counterpoint debate and breakout discussion roundtables.

IBC's Vaccine Production Summit offers you a focused look at how other organizations have resolved key challenges of vaccine production, giving you strategies you can apply right away in your own operations.

Advertorial: Stem Cells & Bioprocessing Europe 2012

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Stem Cells & Bioprocessing Europe 2012 (June 27-28, 2012, London, UK) will provide attendees with an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the latest research being conducted in these fast expanding fields.

Registered attendees will have access to four highly relevant co-located tracks on “Cell Culture”, “Biotherapeutics”, “Stem Cells”, and “Single Use Technologies”. With an expected attendance of over 250 researchers and industry representatives, and a large exhibition made up of leading equipment manufacturers, Stem Cells and Bioprocessing is a must attend event for any one working in this field.

BiotecBooks

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  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
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Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics

David Whitehouse, Ralph Rapley

ISBN: 978-0-470-74814-5

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Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics brings together key developments in the areas of molecular diagnostics, therapeutics and drug discovery. The book includes the following topics: diagnostics, therapeutics, model systems, clinical trials and drug discovery. The developing approaches to molecular and cellular therapies, diagnostics and drug discovery are presented in the context of the pathologies they are devised to treat. /ag

Statistical Modelling of Molecular Descriptors in QSAR/QSPR

Matthias Dehmer, Kurt Varmuza, Danail Bonchev, Frank Emmert-Streib

ISBN: 978-3-527-32434-7

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This handbook and ready reference presents a combination of statistical, information-theoretic, and data analysis methods to meet the challenge of designing empirical models involving molecular descriptors within bioinformatics. The topics range from investigating information processing in chemical and biological networks to studying statistical and information-theoretic techniques for analyzing chemical structures to employing data analysis and machine learning techniques for QSAR/QSPR. /ag

BiotecCareers

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  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
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PhD and then? Interview with a business consultant

After her PhD in tumor immunology, Maria Müller became a business consultant.

Q: Please tell us about what you do?

A: I work in a team of consultants on projects for different companies, mostly in the pharma/biotech area, to support and consult them on anything and everything from developing a market access strategy for a new drug, reviewing the R&D strategy of a biotech company or provide support after a merger of two companies and driving the integration process forward. Like many others, I started this career without any business background, directly after my PhD.

Q: What do you enjoy most about the job?

A: Diversity and the opportunity to learn all the time. I enjoy interacting with people and like the teamwork. Topics I work on have an immediate effect and I can see my work being implemented and making a difference.

Q: Are there any aspects that could be different?

A: I work longer hours than I would like to and I travel Mo-Thu every week. Traveling can be very exciting (e.g. to New York, Singapore) but can also be tiring.

Q: Why/how did you decide to move from academia to this sector/job?

A: I had done an internship at the consulting company before my PhD and therefore had a good idea what it would be like. After spending few years as a consultant, career opportunities are very good.

Q: What aspects of your PhD experience have been most useful in getting the job, and doing the job?

A: Thinking independently, structuring and planning my work independently, cutting a problem / scientific question down to manageable pieces to address it, being able to pick up new topics quickly.

Q: What is your one tip for scientists who might be considering a move to this sector?

A: Ask questions to people already working in this field, prepare well for the interviews as the questions may surprise scientists – but you can practice! /bj

BiotecNews

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  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
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EMBO Molecular Medicine goes Open Access

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As of March 2012 EMBO Molecular Medicine has become a fully Open Access journal. EMBO Molecular Medicine is one of the highest cited journals in the biomedical sciences to have converted from a subscription-based model to Open Access. The Open Access availability of the entire content of EMBO Molecular Medicine will ensure worldwide visibility of research of broad interest to the molecular medicine community, strengthening the position of the journal as a highly influential publication in the field. All articles published in the journal will be freely available to researchers, clinicians, the public and other users to view, download and share. /vk

Current Protocols

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  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
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Gene assembly from chip- synthesized oligonucleotides

De novo synthesis of long double-stranded DNA constructs has a myriad of applications in biology and biological engineering. Its widespread adoption however, has been hindered by high costs. Cost can be significantly reduced using oligonucleotides synthesized on high-density DNA chips; however, most methods for using off-chip DNA for gene synthesis have failed to scale due to the high error rates, low yields, and high chemical complexity of the chip-synthesized oligonucleotides. It has recently been demonstrated that some commercial DNA chip manufacturers have improved error rates, and that the issues of chemical complexity and low yields can be solved using barcoded primers to accurately and efficiently amplify subpools of oligonucleotides. A group of Harvard University researchers has provided protocols for computationally designing the DNA chip, amplifying the oligonucleotide subpools, and assembling 500- to 800-bp constructs. /bm [16]

REFERENCES

  1. Top of page
  2. Current events
  3. Getting published
  4. Modelling regional scale biofuel scenarios: A case study for India
  5. Tumeric-based bandage coating to aid wound healing
  6. Targeting dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  7. Genomics in tuberculosis and possible drug targets
  8. Drug resistance genes a “hot spot” for tuberculosis mutation
  9. Scaling down fermentations using “slow release” feeds
  10. Treating biofilm infections: Ethanol catheter lock technique
  11. Bacteria in the gut of house flies
  12. Stress tolerance of rice plants
  13. Disease resistance in maize
  14. Glycolipids improve lutein accumulation in eyes
  15. Cell wall-active agents enhance biofilm formation
  16. Heat stress-induced chromate reductase activity
  17. Special Issue
  18. Nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy
  19. Odor representations in the mammalian olfactory bulb
  20. 3rd International Conference “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”
  21. BiotecEvents
  22. BiotecBooks
  23. BiotecCareers
  24. BiotecNews
  25. Current Protocols
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