SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Thumbnail image of

Editors: Judy Peng /jp; Uta Göbel /ug; Lucie Kalvodova /lk

E-mail: biotecvisions@wiley.com

Contributors: Allison Goldstein /ag; Andrea Modica /am; Erwin Ripmeester /er; Fran Harding /fh; Gillian van Beest /gvb; Joanna Cipolla /jc; Karen Chu /kc; Kerstin Brachhold /kb; Lotte Nielsen /ln; Meghana Hemphill /mh; Prisca Henheik /pmh; Tiffany McKerahan /tmk

December 2012

Biotech of shortbread

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

When the BiotecVisions team asked me to write on my experiments in baking, I was dubious about the relationship between baking and biotechnology. What did my tinkering with recipes have to do with “the exploitation of biological processes for industrial purposes,” as defined by the Oxford English dictionary?

But as an editor who was first a scientist, I also see that technology is the tinkering of scientific knowledge for human benefit. Which is exactly what I was trying to achieve in my efforts to optimize the taste of my shortbread without compromising its structural integrity.

Thumbnail image of

My existing shortbread was somewhat lacking in taste. For me, shortbread is about the butter, and I endeavored to double the butter content as a first attempt. While a dough could still be formed with a 1:1 ratio of butter to flour, the dough required some extra work. The result was definitely buttery, but the high fat content made it brittle and slightly oily. Further modification was needed. A 3:4 ratio of butter to flour yielded shortbread that tasted very buttery while maintaining structural integrity and robust enough for additional flavor enhancements such as cocoa, essences or my personal favorite, crystallized ginger pieces.

So, for the holiday season, my shortbread recipe:

•  Cream together 375 mL butter (at room temperature) and 75 mL icing sugar

•  Beat in 5 mL Bourbon vanilla extract

•  Beat in 500 mL flour, adding in 2 additions

•  Add flavor enhancement of choice (optional)

•  Continue to beat mixture until dough forms on the beater attachments and aggregates.

•  Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead a few times until malleable.

•  Roll out dough and cut into shapes

•  Bake at 350°F for 15 minutes or until golden.

Karen Chu is Assistant Editor for European Journal of Immunology and regularly provides the BiotecVisions team with innovative baked goodies.

Getting published

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Insights from the Editorial Office: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research

Molecular Nutrition & Food Research (MNF) is a primary research journal devoted to health, safety and all aspects of molecular nutrition such as nutritional biochemistry, nutrigenomics and metabolomics.

Thumbnail image of

Publication criteria: In the diverse field of food & nutrition sciences, our journal focuses on three main topics:

(i)  correlation between nutrition and health,

(ii)  food functionality at the molecular level, and

(iii)  safety aspects of food constituents.

We publish several article types: reviews, research articles, and a new category, food & function (where we publish very short papers dealing with the molecular/medicinal effect of food extracts/mixtures). Due to the excellent standing of the journal we set a very high standard of scientific quality and novelty of the papers.

The “do's” of publishing in MNF: follow the “Instructions to Authors” religiously! Feel free to contact the Editorial Office if you have questions. Also, carefully proof-read the manuscript before submission and make sure that the English is correct and clear. Consider asking a colleague; authors are often blind to their own mistakes. A carefully prepared manuscript makes a good first impression. This includes not only the text, but also the figures.

“Don'ts”: poor figure labeling / set-up; short legends that one needs to read half of the results section to understand them. Figures prepared with intricate color schemes but eventually published in greyscale, thus making them hard to understand.

It might be helpful for authors to bear in mind what they expect from a paper as a reader. Title and abstract are critical, followed by figures (+ legends), conclusion and results. Try to be as concise as possible!

Finally, remember that the Editorial Office, Editors and Reviewers aim to publish high-quality articles and are there to help you, the authors. Use this resource wisely! /cm

Chris Mayer is Managing Editor of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, the top primary research journal in the ISI category: Food Science and Technology

Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Nut allergies are amongst the most severe of food allergies: even trace amounts may trigger an allergic reaction. Noting that the fat content of food influences the rate at which it is digested, consuming nuts as a part of a high fat meal was hypothesized to slow allergen uptake and decrease accompanying allergic symptoms. To test this, magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure gastric emptying rate after consuming a 35% fat chocolate bar or an 8% fat chocolate mousse. In a parallel study, reported in the same paper published in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, hazelnuts and peanuts embedded in either food were consumed by allergic patients. Chocolate bars induced lower gastric emptying rates and raised the threshold required to elicit symptoms compared to the lower fat dessert. /fh [1]

Thumbnail image of

Pretty but unhealthy

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Consumers often prefer “clean looking” foods to their unprocessed forms. To make pistachio nuts more visually appealing, they are often bleached with hydrogen peroxide to make their shells appear whiter. Researchers from Tufts University, Boston, show in the European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology that compared to natural pistachios, the bleached nuts have lower nutritional quality, tend to get rancid, and the oil can even have cytotoxic properties. /lk [2]

Thumbnail image of

Peanut allergy probiotics

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Peanut allergy accounts for the majority of severe food-related allergic reactions and there is a need for new prevention and treatment strategies. Currently, allergen avoidance is the only way to prevent allergic responses but in the case of peanut allergy, accidental ingestion is common owing to the trace amount of peanut in many food products and cross-contamination during food processing. Probiotics may be considered for treatment on the basis of their immunomodulating properties. The authors of this article in FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology selected three probiotic strains to investigate their prophylactic potential in a peanut sensitization model by analysing peanut-specific antibodies and immune cell responses. Strikingly, certain strains may even worsen the allergic reaction. /gvb [3]

Thumbnail image of

Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

The health beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids characteristic of fish oil are now widely recognized. In Lipid Technology John Stanley (Oxford, UK) discusses published clinical trials on this matter and shows that more recent randomised controlled trials have failed to observe the beneficial effects seen in the earlier trials; the effects seem to have disappeared over the last decade. Read how our understanding of this subject has evolved and which could be the reasons for the apparent disappearance of the beneficial effects of omega-3s on the risk of cardiovascular disease. /lk [4]

Thumbnail image of

Cancer protective effects of hops

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Hops are known for their use as a flavouring agent in beer. More recently, compounds derived from hop flowers have been attributed with chemoprotective properties and used to alleviate symptoms of menopause. A number of mechanisms have been reported to account for the anti-cancer effects of the chalcone xanthohumol, found at high concentrations within hops. By examining the uptake and localisation of xanthohumol in breast cancer cells, a new means of influence over cancer cell behaviour has been shown in this article in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research. Xanthohumol accumulated within the cell nucleus, prompting analysis that identified histone proteins H2A, H2B and H4 as its binding partners. Histone binding links xanthohumol action to epigenetic changes to the cell's DNA, potentially regulating gene expression and controlling cancer cell behavior. /fh [5]

Thumbnail image of

Increasing vitamin C in plant foods

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Vitamin C is the common name for L-ascorbic acid. In humans, the principal role of vitamin C is to scavenge reactive oxygen species and it plays an important role as co-factor for many enzymes. Plant foods are the primary source of L-ascorbic acid for humans. The net content of L-ascorbic acid in plants and different plant organs used for human food is determined through a balance of different biosynthetic, recycling, and catabolic pathways. This review article in Biotechnology Journal discusses the importance of L-ascorbic acid for human health and the current knowledge on its metabolism and function in plants. In addition, it provides a current and forward looking perspective of how plant science can contribute to improve L-ascorbic acid content in crop species using plant biotechnology. /ug [6]

Thumbnail image of

Biofortification of plant foods

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Antioxidants are protective molecules that neutralize reactive oxygen species and prevent oxidative damage to cellular components such as membranes, proteins and nucleic acids, therefore reducing the rate of cell death and hence the effects of ageing and ageing-related diseases. The fortification of food with antioxidants represents an overlap between two diverse environments, namely fortification of staple foods with essential nutrients that happen to have antioxidant properties and the fortification of luxury foods with health-promoting but non-essential antioxidants such as flavonoids as part of the nutraceuticals/functional foods industry. This review in Plant Biotechnology Journal considers the state-of-the-art in antioxidant biofortification and discusses the challenges that remain to be overcome in the development of nutritionally complete and health-promoting functional foods. /jc [7]

Thumbnail image of

More and better cherry tomatoes

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

As the concentrations of essential vitamins and minerals and a number of other health-promoting compounds are often low in stable crops, research is underway to understand and increase synthesis of phytochemicals in order to improve crop nutritional quality. This study reported in Annals of Applied Biology addresses whether shoot genotypes or root genotypes with tolerant drought character are able to increase the fruit quality and production of tomato cherries under moderate water stress. /jc [8]

Thumbnail image of

Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

p-Courmaric acid (p-CA), a micronutrient found in cereals, fruits and vegetables, exerts an antioxidant and antiflammatory action in the gut. Recent work published in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research reveals that probiotic lactobacillus harbored within the gut respond to p-CA exposure by switching on gene expression programs to counter oxidative stress. The authors propose that carryover of p-CA into the colon places gut microflora under pressure to select organisms able to generate strong antioxidant response. This adaptation is also potentially beneficial for intestinal function. Knowledge of how microflora tolerate challenges within the gut environment allows strategies to promote growth of probiotic bacteria to be devised. /fh [9]

Thumbnail image of

Truffles

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Truffles are hypogeous ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi belonging to the genus Tuber. Although outplanting of truffle-inoculated host plants has enabled the realization of productive orchards, truffle cultivation is not yet standardized. Therefore, monitoring the distribution of fungal species in different truffle fields may help us to elucidate the factors that shape microbial communities and influence the propagation and fruiting of Tuber spp. In this study published in FEMS Microbiology Ecology the authors compared the fungal biodiversity in cultivated and natural Tuber melanosporum truffle fields located in Central Italy. /ln [10]

Thumbnail image of

Food products contamination

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

The incidence of outbreaks of food-borne viral disease has increased considerably during the last decades, possibly due to the rapid globalization of the food market. Foods commonly implicated in outbreaks are those that are minimally processed, such as shellfish or fresh produce, although ready-to-eat foods are also involved. Contamination can occur at various points along the food supply chain, from the irrigation of vegetables with polluted water to poor hygiene practice by food handlers. Molecular epidemiology and surveillance of environmental samples are necessary to elucidate the public health hazards associated with food contamination. However detection of infectious virus particles is technically demanding. This article in FEMS Microbiology Reviews covers sampling methods and strategies, first-choice detection methods and evaluation criteria of food products contamination. /gvb [11]

Thumbnail image of

Advanced sausages

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Speaking in physical terms many meat products such as frankfurters are complex colloidal suspensions of meat, fat and water. Their tasty and solid texture is owing greatly to saturated fats. Oleogels (aka organogels) have the ability to give also liquid fats a structure and can be used to stabilize healthier vegetable oils to replace saturated fats in comminuted meat products. The results of an organogelation study of traditional Italian spicy spreadable sausage is presented in the European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology. /lk [12]

Thumbnail image of

More on organogelation – a hot topic in food technology:

Edible oleogels in food products to help maximize health benefits and improve nutritional profiles

Structuring oils without highly saturated fats – how far are we?

The chemistry of decanting

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

A decanter is a wide-bottomed container that gives maximum air exposure to the wine. Decanting accelerates the breathing process in which a few volatile substances will evaporate and the wine's aroma will change during the first 10 to 30 min. It also apparently softens the taste of the tannins. A selective and sensitive LC-MS method for the determination of the variations of 20 components including organic acids and polyphenols in red wine was developed. Organic acids are the major sour substance, and polyphenols -as the most abundant and bioactive compounds – play important roles in both the health-promoting properties and the harsh taste of red wine. [14]

Thumbnail image of

Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

In BioEssays, Mengxi Jiang et al. discuss recent findings that some plant/food-derived microRNAs (miRNAs) are capable of regulating mammalian gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. During digestion molecules such as amino acids and fatty acids, but also miRNAs, are taken up by cells of the gastrointestinal tract. miRNAs may be selectively packaged into microvesicles. These microvesicles can then be transported via the circulatory system to organs (e.g. the liver) where the miRNAs are released and execute their function. Further studies are needed to identify the mammalian targets of these miRNAs and to evaluate their effects on metabolism and health. /kb [15]

Thumbnail image of

Special issue

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Biotechnology of fermented food systems

Fermented foods and probiotics are becoming more and more important for our nutrition and health, because their properties can be adjusted according to different target groups, e.g. for different age groups, health conditions, (e.g. irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease and intestinal cancer), or for those whose microflora is compromised. This Special issue of Engineering in Life Sciences edited by Atanas Pavlov and Dora Beshkova (University of Food Technologies, Plovdiv, Bulgaria) features Reviews and primary research on recent advances in the area of fermented food systems. /ug

Thumbnail image of
Read the following article highlights:

Bacterial diversity and functionalities in food fermentations

Frédéric Ravyts, Luc De Vuyst and Frédéric Leroy

Development of probiotic products for nutritional requirements of specific human populations

Silvia Arboleya, Sonia González, Nuria Salazar, Patricia Ruas-Madiedo et al.

Improving traditional fermented beverages: How to evolve from spontaneous to directed fermentation

José Luis Navarrete-Bolaños

BiotecBooks

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Food Irradiation Research and Technology, 2nd Ed.

Christopher H. Sommers and Xuetong Fan (Editors)

ISBN: 978-0-8138-0209-1

Thumbnail image of

The latest title from the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Press series, this updated second edition of Food Irradiation Research and Technology reviews the latest developments in irradiation technologies as they are applied to various foods. /ag

Food Materials Science and Engineering

Bhesh Bhandari

ISBN: 978-1-4051-9922-3

Thumbnail image of

Food Materials Science and Engineering covers a comprehensive range of topics in relation to food materials, their properties, and characterization techniques – thus offering a new approach to understanding food production and quality control. /ag

Food Biochemistry and Food Processing, 2nd Edition

Benjamin K. Simpson and colleagues

ISBN: 978-0-8138-0874-1

Thumbnail image of

In this fully revised and updated second edition, the editors brought together more than fifty acclaimed academicians and industry professionals from around the world to create this indispensable reference and text on food biochemistry and the ever increasing developments in the biotechnology of food processing. /ag

Virtual issues

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES

Nutrition – from IUBMB journals

Thumbnail image of

BioFactors, two journals published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB). The topic of nutrition has become central in health sciences after it has been established that many diseases can be prevented by an appropriate intake of nutrients. For example, some 70–90 % of the most common ailments, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancers, and other major causes of mortality, can be avoided by a change in diet and lifestyle.

Although on some occasions science has been too quick in providing miraculous solutions to cure all diseases with appropriate nutrition, in general, scientific research is very cautious in providing strong and definite answers; we are well aware of the fact that science is continuously evolving and with it, applications and recommendations have to be well-thought-through.

The current collection of articles provides a scientific basis that goes beyond miraculous claims, which are, unfortunately, frequently reported by the nonscientific press.� In the selected articles, particular attention has been given to those that have been highly cited in other scientific publications.

Biotechnology & food quality

Thumbnail image of

The Journal of Food Quality, the only fully peer-reviewed scientific journal explicitly devoted to issues of food quality, offers a free Virtual Issue titled “Biotechnology in Journal of Food Quality.”� This collection of papers contains some of the journal's recent publications in the areas of food and biotechnology. /tmk

BiotecCareers

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES
Thumbnail image of

The power of LinkedIn

Social media is all around us – not just in our personal lives but more and more so also in our professional lives. It is not surprising therefore, to know that LinkedIn, one of the most well-established professional online networks, plays a critical role in the job market.

Many of us have LinkedIn accounts – what is not well known however, is that not all profiles are the same. An 100% complete profile ensures that your profile is more likely to be found on LinkedIn.

Additional points that would ensure your profile stands above the crowd:

•  We are visual creatures – having a profile photo increases your odds of people clicking on your profile 7 fold, according to LinkedIn.

•  We are also social creatures – employees with a good network are an asset in many employers' eyes. LinkedIn states that having at least 50 connections helps users get the most of the network.

•  As with a good CV, an informative short summary provides good insight to who you are – and write this in the first person.

•  What about your skills? Include at least 5 skills in your profile. As the saying goes, dress for the job you want, not the job you have – list the skills that are important for your future career aspirations and not necessarily those important for your current position.

Other ways of using LinkedIn to your advantage:

Groups: join an active group in LinkedIn to meet new people and stay up-to-date in your industry/field. Adding comments and contributing to conversations will help others know of you and about what you do.

News: go to “LinkedIn Today” (under the News tab) and choose the news applicable to you.

Jobs: LinkedIn provides a unique aspect as far as job boards are concerned – these positions are tied directly to a person and LinkedIn provides information on how you can be connected to that person or organization. It is also possible to do it the “traditional” way, by asking someone to recommend you and pass on your CV via LinkedIn.

Ultimately, building a career requires good networks and LinkedIn is a good tool for spreading your network.

Adapted from article on Wiley Job Network by Miriam Salpeter, owner of Keppie Careers -job search and social media strategist, career coach, resume writer, author, and speaker

WIREs

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES
Thumbnail image of

Regulation of obesity: Central dopaminergic circuitry controlling food intake and reward

Central nervous system mechanisms responsible for control of food intake have evolved to sense the nutrient and energy levels in the organism and to coordinate appropriate responses to adjust energy intake and expenditure. However, hedonic and emotional aspects of feeding also affect food intake. This review focuses on the homeostatic and hedonic signals for the regulation of food intake and maintenance of caloric balance. /mh [16]

Serotonin signaling in eating disorders

The brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system is implicated in the neurobiological control of feeding and appears to be dysfunctional in patients suffering from feeding disorders, such as anorexia, bulimia, and obesity. This review covers the implication of different 5-HT receptor subtypes in feeding behavior based on their identification and cloning, the production of agonist and antagonist compounds, and the generation of 5-HT receptor knock-out mice. /mh [17]

Adapting to climate change to sustain food security

Adapting food systems both to enhance food security for the poor and vulnerable and to prevent future negative impacts from climate change will require attention to more than just agricultural production. This article surveys the multiple components of food security, particularly those relating to access and utilization. The authors also discuss institutional interventions that could be strengthened to enable adaptation in the food system to buffer against climate change. /mh [18]

Thumbnail image of

REFERENCES

  1. Top of page
  2. Biotech of shortbread
  3. Getting published
  4. Reduce allergy symptoms: Eat high fat foods alongside nuts
  5. Pretty but unhealthy
  6. Peanut allergy probiotics
  7. Have beneficial effects of fish oil on cardiovascular disease disappeared?
  8. Cancer protective effects of hops
  9. Increasing vitamin C in plant foods
  10. Biofortification of plant foods
  11. More and better cherry tomatoes
  12. Gut flora shaped by plant-based micronutrients
  13. Truffles
  14. Food products contamination
  15. Advanced sausages
  16. Probiotics for healthier food
  17. The chemistry of decanting
  18. Food for thought: Meals deliver nutrients and regulatory information
  19. Special issue
  20. BiotecBooks
  21. Virtual issues
  22. BiotecCareers
  23. WIREs
  24. Stay up to date with BiotecVisions
  25. REFERENCES