Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 1

Special Issue: Biotech Methods and Advances

January 2012

Volume 7, Issue 1

Pages 1–164

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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      Biotech Methods and Advances

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290000

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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      Editorial Board: Biotechnology Journal 1/2012 (page 1)

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290005

  3. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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    2. You have free access to this content
  4. In this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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      In this issue (page 6)

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290002

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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      Contents: Biotechnology Journal 1/2012 (pages 7–8)

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290003

  6. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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  7. Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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    2. You have free access to this content
  8. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
  9. Reviews

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
    1. Metabolic engineering for the production of clinically important molecules: Omega-3 fatty acids, artemisinin, and taxol (pages 20–33)

      Victor M. Ye and Dr. Sujata K. Bhatia

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100289

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metabolic engineering harnesses the intrinsic metabolic machinery of cells for the manufacture of useful molecules. One approach for metabolic engineering is to tune existing biochemical pathways within cells to maximize synthesis of desired molecular entities. The review article describes the utility of metabolic engineering for producing three molecules that are important for the biomedical community: (A) omega-3 fatty acids, (B) artemisinin, and (C) taxol, in a variety of cellular hosts.

    2. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient anaerobic xylose fermentation: Reflections and perspectives (pages 34–46)

      Zhen Cai, Bo Zhang and Prof. Yin Li

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      One possible solution to the energy crisis is the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol. There are however, many hurdles with regards to efficient conversion using the common yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This review addresses the questions (as highlighted in the graphical abstract) by a thorough comparison of the approaches and anaerobic fermentation results of 30 engineered xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strains.

    3. Manipulation of enzyme properties by noncanonical amino acid incorporation (pages 47–60)

      Shun Zheng and Dr. Inchan Kwon

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100267

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Enymes are widely used in both research and industrial applications; however, their properties are not always optimal. This review article covers two major methods of incorporating noncanonical amino acids into enzymes, both of which have great potential in improving enzyme properties.

    4. Towards dynamic metabolic flux analysis in CHO cell cultures (pages 61–74)

      Woo Suk Ahn and Prof. Maciek R. Antoniewicz

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100052

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most widely used mammalian cell line for biopharmaceutical production. Understanding CHO metabolism through quantifying their metobolic rates (i.e. fluxes) will have direct impact on biopharmaceutical processes. This diagram summarizes the central metabolic pathways of CHO cells used for metabolic flux analysis studies.

    5. Mammalian cells as biopharmaceutical production hosts in the age of omics (pages 75–89)

      Stefanie Dietmair, Prof. Lars K. Nielsen and Nicholas E. Timmins

      Article first published online: 16 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100369

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This review article discusses recent omics studies investigating differences in mammalian cell phenotypes impacting on recombinant protein production (e.g., growth rate, metabolism, productivity). The manuscript highlights the insights gained by these studies as well as the challenges associated with the interpretation of omics studies.

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      Isolation and purification of recombinant proteins, antibodies and plasmid DNA with hydroxyapatite chromatography (pages 90–102)

      Frank Hilbrig and Prof. Ruth Freitag

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100015

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Product isolation is a common challenge in bioproduction. It is often assumed that a highly specific isolation of the target molecule is only possible by affinity chromatography or some variant thereof. In this review article, the authors describe how hydroxyapatite, a natural, very biocompatible material can be used to set up equally selective and highly efficient separations without the need for any additional ligands.

  10. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
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    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
    1. A three-dimensional colocalization RNA interference screening platform to elucidate the alternative lengthening of telomeres pathway (pages 103–116)

      Sarah Osterwald, Stefan Wörz, Jürgen Reymann, Frank Sieckmann, Karl Rohr, Holger Erfle and Dr. Karsten Rippe

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201000474

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway describes a mechanism through which cancer cells can maintain their unlimited proliferative potential. In this article, the authors describe a new method to study this pathway, i.e. a high-content colocalization RNA interference screen based on automatic confocal fluorescence microscopy. This unbiased and quantitative analysis allows the identification of candidate genes for the ALT pathway, which in turn represent possible targets for cancer therapy.

    2. An in vitro model of glucose and lipid metabolism in a multicompartmental bioreactor (pages 117–126)

      Bruna Vinci, Ellen Murphy, Elisabetta Iori, Francesco Meduri, Silvia Fattori, Maria Cristina Marescotti, Maura Castagna, Angelo Avogaro and Professor Arti Ahluwalia

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100177

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It is accepted that current in-vitro cell culture systems are poorly representative of human or animal physiology. In this article, the authors attempt to improve the current 2D culture systems with a modular multicompartmental bioreactor (MCmB) system, which provides an in vitro model of glucose and lipid metabolism that is more reflective of the actual situation in vivo.

    3. A screening tool for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies: Identifying the most stable protein and its best formulation based on thioflavin T binding (pages 127–132)

      Veysel Kayser, Naresh Chennamsetty, Vladimir Voynov, Bernhard Helk, Kurt Forrer and Prof. Bernhardt L. Trout

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100366

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The selection of the most stable protein for therapeutic/diagnostic applications from the many candidates available is an expensive and time-consuming process. In this research article, the authors propose an alternative method to determine protein aggregration propensity using the thioflavin T (ThT)-binding assay, which is able to deliver results in a matter of days compared to the months needed with size-exclusion chromatography.

    4. Histidine affinity tags affect MSP142 structural stability and immunodominance in mice (pages 133–147)

      Farhat Khan, Patricia M. Legler, Ryan M. Mease, Elizabeth H. Duncan, Elke S. Bergmann-Leitner and Dr. Evelina Angov

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100331

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Histidine tags can influence protein expression levels, structural stability and immunodominance: Experimental evidence from the current study demonstrates that His tags have far reaching impact on protein helical content and stability, and influence immunodominance of humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. The overall advantages of improved expression level and ease of chromatography may be outweighed by the effect on protein structure and the diversion of host immune responses.

  11. Technical Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
    1. G-PKDrep-live, a genetically encoded FRET reporter to measure PKD activity at the trans-Golgi-network (pages 148–154)

      Stephan A. Eisler, Yannick F. Fuchs, Klaus Pfizenmaier and Dr. Angelika Hausser

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100273

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Being able to detect intracellular protein localization in real-time would provide a great boost to our understanding of cell physiology. In this article, the authors report a genetically encoded fluorescence-based reporter to measure the activity of protein kinase D (PKD) at the Golgi complex in living cells.

    2. Sensitive high-throughput screening for the detection of reducing sugars (pages 155–162)

      Andrea Mellitzer, Anton Glieder, Roland Weis, Christoph Reisinger and Dr. Karlheinz Flicker

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In order for biofuels to be economically viable and socially acceptable (i.e. not competing with food sources), enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials is a vital part of the equation. The development of enzymes and strains for these processes requires reliable and fast activity-based screening assays. In this article, the authors report an assay based on the formation of osazones from reducing sugars and para-hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazide that is five times more sensitive than current assays.

  12. Meetings

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentaries
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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