Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 11

November 2012

Volume 7, Issue 11

Pages 1317–1419, A1–A8

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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      Cover Picture: Biotechnology Journal 11/2012

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290055

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      This “regular” issue of Biotechnology Journal gathers the state-of-the-art in biotechnology, with articles on bioenergy, biofuels, medical biotechnology, biomaterials, etc.

      Image: © Sergej Khackimullin – Fotolia.com.

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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      Editorial Board: Biotechnology Journal 11/2012

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290059

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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      Editorial: Biotechnology's impact on sustainable development (page 1317)

      Prof. Alois Jungbauer and Prof. Sang Yup Lee

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200346

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      Biotechnology is increasingly recognized in society as a technology to improve the quality of life in a sustainable manner. It is clear that bioenergy and biofuel cannot solve a world energy crisis or reverse global warming, but from a local perspective it can contribute a lot.

  4. In this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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      In this issue (page 1318)

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290056

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: Biotechnology Journal 11/2012 (pages 1319–1320)

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290057

  6. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
    1. You have free access to this content
  7. Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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      A blessing in disguise: International standards for the biotechnology industry (pages 1321–1323)

      Joachim Lonien

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200294

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      Regardless of the industry, standards are ubiquitous in our everyday lives and essential to the interconnection of people, businesses, and countries. Joachim Lonien, DIN – German Institute for Standardization, introduces the idea behind the ISO/TC “Biotechnology”.

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      Genetically modified mosquito: The Malaysian public engagement experience (pages 1323–1327)

      T. S. Saraswathy Subramaniam, Han Lim Lee, Nazni Wasi Ahmad and Shahnaz Murad

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200282

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      Sterile male genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were released in a field trial in Malaysia in December 2010. The objective of the deliberate release was to study the biological characteristics of the GM mosquito under field conditions. This paper describes the biosafety review process, regulatory protocols at national level and public engagement before the limited field trial. Our experience has shown that public engagement is an important component of field releases to provide information, receive feedback from the public and gain public trust through the transparency of the process.

  8. Perspective

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
    1. Orgenic plants: Gene-manipulated plants compatible with organic farming (pages 1328–1331)

      Prof. Gerhart U. Ryffel

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200225

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      This perspective article proposes the use of orgenic plants in the laboratory and the field. These orgenic plants do not contain herbicide resistance genes to avoid herbicide application in agriculture and they either contain genes that are naturally exchanged between species or are sterile to avoid outcrossing, if they received a transgene from a different species.

  9. Rapid Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
    1. Efficient reversal of phiC31 integrase recombination in mammalian cells (pages 1332–1336)

      Alfonso P. Farruggio, Christopher L. Chavez, Carlos L. Mikell and Prof. Michele P. Calos

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200283

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      The phiC31 integrase system is a handy tool to insert genes into mammalian genomes. Until now, the integration reaction has been irreversible. In this study the authors show for the first time that by co-expressing the phiC31 excisionase, or recombining directionality factor, the integration reaction can be reversed efficiently in mammalian cells. Thus, genetic engineers can now take advantage of this site-specific recombination system in either the forward or reverse direction.

  10. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
    1. Exploring the combinatorial genomic space in Escherichia coli for ethanol tolerance (pages 1337–1345)

      Sergios A. Nicolaou, Stefan M. Gaida and Prof. Eleftherios T. Papoutsakis

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200227

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      Multiple genomic library screening reveals genomic loci that impart higher tolerance to ethanol stress. The identified genomic fragments were investigated to show an improvement in phenotype and higher resistance to ethanol. This method explores the combinatorial genome space and identifies genetic interactions that are beneficial for higher ethanol stress tolerance.

    2. Production of human cytochrome P450 2D6 drug metabolites with recombinant microbes – a comparative study (pages 1346–1358)

      Martina Geier, Andreas Braun, Anita Emmerstorfer, Harald Pichler and Dr. Anton Glieder

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200187

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      Biotransformations employing recombinant microorganisms as whole-cell biocatalysts have become an attractive alternative to the chemical synthesis of drug metabolites. In this study, authors compare the potential and differences of four microbial hosts to express the human cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). Pichia pastoris shows to be the most efficient host. Without additional over-expression of chaperons, the achieved yield of CYP2D6 was higher than described with other microbial hosts reported so far.

    3. Recombinantly produced cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus for glucose biosensors and biofuel cells (pages 1359–1366)

      Wolfgang Harreither, Alfons K. G. Felice, Regina Paukner, Lo Gorton, Dr. Roland Ludwig and Christoph Sygmund

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200049

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      Recombinant cellobiose deyhdrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus is capable of transferring electrons directly to conductive electrode materials. The enzyme's good performance with glucose at pH 7.4 allows the construction of 3rd generation biosensors working under physiological conditions. This work establishes the basis for enzyme engineering towards the use in miniaturized biosensors and biofuel cells.

    4. Molecular dynamics simulation of the induced-fit binding process of DNA aptamer and L-argininamide (pages 1367–1375)

      Po-Hsun Lin, Ching-Wei Tsai, Josephine W. Wu, Ruoh-Chyu Ruaan and Dr. Wen-Yih Chen

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200003

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      Aptamer-ligand induced-fit binding mechanism provides a guideline in aptamer design for molecular recognition engineering. Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that the mechanism has the following characteristic stages: (a) adsorption stage, the Arm anchors to the binding site of aptamer with strong electrostatic interaction; (b) binding stage, the Arm fits into the binding site of aptamer by hydrogen bonding formation; and (c) complex stabilization stage, the hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction cooperatively stabilize the complex structure in an aqueous solution.

    5. Wound-healing evaluation of entrapped active agents into protein microspheres over cellulosic gauzes (pages 1376–1385)

      Raquel Silva, Helena Ferreira, Teresa Matamá, Andreia C. Gomes and Prof. Artur Cavaco-Paulo

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200142

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      New bandages containing anti-inflammatory entrapped pharmaceutical agents' for the chronic wound management: A functionalized biomaterial has been developed that delivers the pharmaceutical agent in a controlled manner reducing the inflammation process. Furthermore, dermal burn healing experiments using human skin equivalents have shown that the application of the new material accelerates the re-epithelisation and wound closure.

    6. Biomimetic soluble collagen purified from bones (pages 1386–1394)

      Ana Marina Ferreira, Piergiorgio Gentile, Susanna Sartori, Cristina Pagliano, Chiara Cabrele, Valeria Chiono and Prof. Gianluca Ciardelli

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200184

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      Absence of proteoglycans in collagen fibres mimic pathological conditions associated with aging-related diseases: the current study demonstrates that the absence of proteoglycans in isolated type I collagen affects its thermal properties, the extraction into its native structure, and its capability to hydrate and self-assemble into fibres. The fine control and tuning of all these features linked to the absence of non-collagenous proteins such as proteoglycans offer the possibility to design new strategies and biomaterials with advanced biomimetic properties aimed at regenerating bone tissue.

    7. Gene network analysis leads to functional validation of pathways linked to cancer cell growth and survival (pages 1395–1404)

      Dr. Emmanuelle Berger, Nathalie Vega, Hubert Vidal and Alain Geloën

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200188

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      For more effectice treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) it is feasable to understand cellular and genetic alterations in HCC cells. This study combines numerous transcriptomic data on gene sets deregulated in HCC and specifically regulated by targeted signaling pathways. This approach lead to the identification of signaling pathways and genes preferentially represented in human liver, which are involved in the dysregulation of cell growth and/or survival in HCC, e.g. pathways linked to MAP kinase signaling (Mek1/2; P42/44; Janus kinase 1) and transcription factors (e.g. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor alpha, CCAAT/Enhancer Binding factor alpha).

  11. Technical Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
    1. Albumin 3′untranslated region facilitates increased recombinant protein production from Chinese hamster ovary cells (pages 1405–1411)

      Mark J. Pearson, Siavash Khazaipoul, Asta Optun, Ian F. Pryme, Beate Stern and Dr. John E. Hesketh

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200044

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      Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are a valuable tool and are widely used for recombinant protein production in the pharmaceutical industry; however, there remains a need to improve the recombinant protein expression levels. In this study, authors test the effectiveness of various 3′untranslated regions (UTRs) in promoting production of a naturally secreted luciferase. They show that manipulation of expression vectors by inclusion of appropriate 3′UTR sequences is a potentially useful approach to improve recombinant protein expression and yield.

    2. Photosynthetic efficiency and rate of CO2 assimilation by Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis continuously cultivated in a tubular photobioreactor (pages 1412–1417)

      Marcelo Chuei Matsudo, Raquel Pedrosa Bezerra, Sunao Sato, Attilio Converti and Dr. João Carlos Monteiro de Carvalho

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200177

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      Arthrospira platensis can be used to produce pigments, single cell protein, fatty acids (which can be used for bioenergy), food and feed supplements, and biofixation of CO2. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of light intensity and dilution rate on the photosynthetic efficiency and CO2 assimilation efficiency of A. platensis cultured in a tubular photobioreactor in continuous process. Continuous cultivation of this cyanobacterium presents an opportunity for the large-scale fixation of CO2 to mitigate the greenhouse effect while producing high protein content biomass.

  12. Meetings

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Perspective
    10. Rapid Communication
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Reports
    13. Meetings
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