Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 2

Special Issue: Industrial Biotechnology

February 2012

Volume 7, Issue 2

Pages 166–311, A1–A8

  1. Cover Picture

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    4. Editorial
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    7. BiotecVisions
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    9. Biotech Highlight
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Research Article
    13. Rapid Communication
    14. Meetings
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      Industrial Biotechnology

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290006

  2. Editorial Board

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      Editorial Board: Biotechnology Journal 2/2012

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290010

  3. Editorial

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  4. In this issue

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  5. Contents

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      Contents: Biotechnologie Journal 2/2012 (pages 169–170)

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290008

  6. BiotecVisions

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  7. Forum

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  8. Biotech Highlight

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      Perspective on opportunities in industrial biotechnology in renewable chemicals (pages 176–185)

      Brent Erickson, Janet E. Nelson and Paul Winters

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100069

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      From biomass to renewable chemicals: while industrial biotechnology offers a clear value proposition, a number of hurdles need to be addressed to fully realize the commercial potential of bio-based products and chemicals over the coming decade. A review of an early roadmap for biological production of chemicals from renewable sugars reveals a focus on those that would provide co-products for integrated biorefineries producing biofuels and bioenergy. A growing number of companies are now focusing on specialty chemicals as an entry point to build the bio-based economy.

  9. Reviews

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    1. Butanol production from renewable biomass: Rediscovery of metabolic pathways and metabolic engineering (pages 186–198)

      Yu-Sin Jang, Joungmin Lee, Alok Malaviya, Do Young Seung, Jung Hee Cho and Prof. Sang Yup Lee

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100059

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      Biofuel from renewable biomass is one of the solutions to the limited supply of fossil resources and climate change. Butanol has superior liquid-fuel characteristics, with similar properties to gasoline, and thus, has the potential to be used as a substitute for gasoline. Herein, we review recent discoveries of metabolic pathways for butanol production from biomass and the metabolic engineering strategies being developed.

    2. Biosynthesis of lactate-containing polyesters by metabolically engineered bacteria (pages 199–212)

      Dr. Si Jae Park, Prof. Sang Yup Lee, Tae Wan Kim, Yu Kyung Jung and Taek Ho Yang

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100070

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      This review article discusses recent advances in the production of lactate-containing homo- and co-polyesters by metabolically engineered bacteria. The manuscript highlights challenges remaining to efficiently produce PLA and its copolymers and strategies to overcome these challenges through metabolic engineering combined with enzyme engineering.

    3. Succinate production in Escherichia coli (pages 213–224)

      Chandresh Thakker, Irene Martínez, Ka-Yiu San and Prof. George N. Bennett

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100061

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      Bio-based succinate production from sugar feedstocks using engineered E. coli: The metabolism of the bacterium, Escherichia coli has been engineered to produce succinic acid from a variety of commonly available feedstocks. This molecule is valuable in specialized applications and can be converted to a variety of other industrial chemicals and polymers by known processes. This review focuses on the engineering of metabolic pathways within E. coli for improved succinic acid production.

    4. Biosynthetic concepts for the production of β-lactam antibiotics in Penicillium chrysogenum (pages 225–236)

      Stefan S. Weber, Roel A. L. Bovenberg and Prof. Arnold J. M. Driessen

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100065

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      The filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is used for the industrial production of β-lactam antibiotics such as penicillin G. Through advanced metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches, the penicillin biosynthesis pathway can be redirected towards the production of cephalosporins and penicillins that are normally produced through semi-synthetic means. This technology now enables more sustainable methods for the fermentative production of unnatural antibiotics and related compounds.

    5. Production of glucuronic acid-based polysaccharides by microbial fermentation for biomedical applications (pages 237–250)

      Donatella Cimini, Mario De Rosa and Prof. Chiara Schiraldi

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100242

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A safer alternative to animal tissue extraction or chemical synthesis of biomedically relevant polymers is the development of biotech processes that exploit capsular/extracellular polysaccharide-producing microorganisms. This review provides an overview on recent advances in the development of molecular tools and fermentation technologies that lead to a better understanding of the metabolic mechanisms and required process conditions for microbial production of four glucuronic acid-based polymers (HA, CS, heparin, alginate).

    6. Rational engineering of Escherichia coli strains for plasmid biopharmaceutical manufacturing (pages 251–261)

      Geisa A. L. Gonçalves, Diana M. Bower, Duarte M. F. Prazeres, Gabriel A. Monteiro and Dr. Kristala L. J. Prather

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100062

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plasmid DNA (pDNA) has the potential to be an effective vector for gene therapy and DNA vaccination. Remarkable progress has been made in plasmid design and downstream processing, but there is still a demand for improved production strains. This review focuses on recent work related to engineering of Escherichia coli host strains for plasmid DNA production. As shown in the graphical abstract, the review emphasizes the interplay between the many factors that influence strain design.

  10. Research Articles

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    1. Filtration kinetics of chitosan separation by electrofiltration (pages 262–274)

      Gözde Gözke, Frank Kirschhöfer, Stefan Heissler, Mirko Trutnau, Gerald Brenner-Weiss, Jelka Ondruschka, Ursula Obst and Clemens Posten

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201000466

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Downstream processing of chitosan requires several technological steps that contribute to the total production costs. Precipitation and especially evaporation are energy-consuming processes, resulting in higher costs and limiting industrial scale production. In this study, the authors investigated the filtration kinetics of chitosan derived from cell walls of fungi and from exoskeletons of arthropods by electrofiltration, thus reducing the downstream processing steps and costs.

    2. Treatment of cotton with an alkaline Bacillus spp cellulase: Activity towards crystalline cellulose (pages 275–283)

      Cristina Caparrós, Carmen López, Marc Torrell, Neil Lant, Johan Smets and Dr. Artur Cavaco-Paulo

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201000352

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cellulases have been applied in detergent formulations for the last 30 years. To fully understand the mechanism of how alkaline cellulases act on cotton fibers a deeper understanding of the structure of cotton fibers during cleaning is required. In this study, the authors have analyzed the influence of several enzymatic treatment processes using an alkaline cellulase enzyme from Bacillus spp. on the sorption properties of cotton fabrics. Several short consecutive treatments were more effective in accessing the fibers while no hydrolytic activity, i.e sugar production was detected.

    3. Enzymatic synthesis of lignin–siloxane hybrid functional polymers (pages 284–292)

      Endry Nugroho Prasetyo, Tukayi Kudanga, Roman Fischer, Reinhard Eichinger, Dr. Gibson S. Nyanhongo and Georg M. Guebitz

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100106

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lignin is currently extensively investigated as a raw material for existing and novel hybrid polymers. The multicopper-containing enzymes, Laccases (benzenediol: oxygen oxidoreductases, EC.1.10.3.2), play a major role in activating lignin by oxidation, thereby increasing the interaction between lignin and siloxane precursors, resulting in interpenetrating polymers. In this article, the authors synthesize lignin-siloxane hybrid coating films to produce hybrid functional polymers that can be used as adhesives, coating materials, and/or multifunctionalized thin-coating films.

  11. Research Article

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    1. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) production by Bacillus cereus SPV using sugarcane molasses as the main carbon source (pages 293–303)

      Everest Akaraonye, Catalina Moreno, Jonathan C. Knowles, Tajalli Keshavarz and Dr. Ipsita Roy

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100122

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sugarcane molasses are a promising carbon source for an economical and commercially viable production of P(3HB). The main hindrance in the use of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) as a replacement for existing petroleum-based plastics is their high production cost. In this study, the authors investigate the use of an agricultural raw material, sugarcane molasses, as the main carbon source for poly (3-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)) production by Bacillus cereus SPV. The polymer yield was 50% higher than previously reported with the same organism.

  12. Rapid Communication

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    1. Enhancing the 3-hydroxyvalerate component in bioplastic PHBV production by Cupriavidus necator (pages 304–309)

      Dr. Nathalie Berezina

      Article first published online: 11 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100191

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a family of bioplastics with a very wide range of properties and applications. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) is among the most popular PHAs, because the 3-hydroxyvalerate (3-HV) content improves the thermal and mechanical properties of PHBV. This article reports the enhancement of the 3-HV component in PHBV production by Cupriavidus necator.

  13. Meetings

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