Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 4

April 2012

Volume 7, Issue 4

Pages 465–583, A1–A8

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
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      Cover Picture: Biotechnology Journal 4/2012

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290019

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      This “regular” issue of Biotechnology Journal features the best of the latest in biotechnology, with articles on established and new productions hosts, such as Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, plant and algae cultures. The cover image shows three shaking flasks illuminated by red, blue and white LEDs. Growth kinetics of the moss Physcomitrella patens under distinct illumination is described by Cerff and Posten (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/biot.201100044), in this issue. Photograph by Christian Steinweg and Kerstin Bertsch.

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
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      Editorial Board: Biotechnology Journal 4/2012 (page 465)

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290023

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
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      Editorial: Enhancing productivity of CHO, plant and algal cells (page 467)

      Dr. Uta Göbel

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100461

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      With this first “regular” issue of Biotechnology Journal we would like to highlight that we invite you all to send us your best articles in the focus areas of BTJ – systems and synthetic biology, nanobiotech and medicine. It features the best of the latest in biotechnology, with several articles on established and new productions hosts, such as Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and plant and algae cultures.

  4. In this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
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      In this issue (page 468)

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290020

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
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      Contents: Biotechnologie Journal 4/2012 (pages 469–470)

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290021

  6. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
    1. You have free access to this content
  7. Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
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      Meeting Report: Synthetic DNA – Writing with the Letters of Life : January 24, 2012, Frankfurt, Germany (pages 471–472)

      Dr. Uta Göbel

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200113

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      The one-day meeting on Synthetic DNA (January 24, 2012) organized by and held at the DECHEMA in Frankfurt attracted about 100 participants from academia and industry interested in synthesizing DNA and its applications in synthetic biology. In recent years the cost for synthetic DNA reduced from 7€/bp to 0.35€/bp which has opened up many new possibilities for molecular biology. (Image: © Spectral-Design – Fotolia.com)

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      World Water Day: A global awareness campaign to tackle the water crisis (pages 473–474)

      Stéfanie Neno

      Article first published online: 29 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200100

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      World Water Day (WWD) has been celebrated on 22 March every year since 1993. It is an opportunity to learn more about water and its centrality in our lives and for the environment, and promote sustainable behaviours and actions towards this precious resource.

  8. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
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      Plant bioreactors – the taste of sweet success (pages 475–476)

      Prof. Eva Stoger

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100472

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      Thaumatin production using tobacco hairy root cultures: This commentary by Prof. Eva Stöger (BOKU, Vienna, Austria) discusses the latest paper by Prof. Michael Wink's group (Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany).

  9. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
    1. Protein and RNA engineering to customize microbial molecular reporting (pages 477–499)

      Joseph A. Gredell, Christopher S. Frei and Dr. Patrick C. Cirino

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100266

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      By following nature's example, ligand-responsive proteins and RNA molecules are now routinely engineered and incorporated into customized molecular reporting systems, such as biosensors. In this review, the authors compare recent efforts in the design and application of customized proteins, RNA molecules, and genetic circuits which control microbial phenotypes in response to specific small molecule stimuli. Examples include altering regulatory protein effector specificity, engineering new allosteric enzymes, and developing in vivo screening systems for novel riboswitches.

  10. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
    1. Dynamic mRNA and miRNA profiling of CHO-K1 suspension cell cultures (pages 500–515)

      Dr. Juan A. Hernández Bort, Matthias Hackl, Helga Höflmayer, Vaibhav Jadhav, Eva Harreither, Niraj Kumar, Wolfgang Ernst, Johannes Grillari and Nicole Borth

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100143

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      The cellular transcriptome is dynamic, changing in response to external and internal stimuli and thus reflecting the current functional capacity of cells as well their ability to adapt to a changing environment. In this study, the authors use microarrays expression profiling to identify mRNA and miRNA that are differentially expressed during CHO-K1 suspension cell batch cultures. The results show the importance of time course experiments for comparison of phenotypes at different culture conditions.

    2. Microarray expression profiling identifies genes regulating sustained cell specific productivity (S-Qp) in CHO K1 production cell lines (pages 516–526)

      Dr. Padraig Doolan, Niall Barron, Paula Kinsella, Colin Clarke, Paula Meleady, Finbarr O'Sullivan, Mark Melville, Mark Leonard and Martin Clynes

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100255

    3. Enhancing the growth of Physcomitrella patens by combination of monochromatic red and blue light – a kinetic study (pages 527–526)

      Martin Cerff and Prof. Clemens Posten

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100044

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      The moss Physcomitrella patens has been established as a promising expression system to produce complex glycosylated biopharmaceutical proteins. Light intensity and illumination wavelength are important cultivation parameters due to their impact on the growth and chlorophyll formation kinetics of the organism. In this work, the authors introduce kinetic studies of enhancing the growth of Physcomitrella patens by a combination of monochromatic red and blue light, while minimizing energy consumption.

    4. Production and secretion of recombinant thaumatin in tobacco hairy root cultures (pages 537–545)

      Ngoc Bich Pham, Holger Schäfer and Prof. Michael Wink

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100430

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      Rhizosecretion of recombinant thaumatin: Tobacco hairy root cultures are a suitable expression platform for the production and secretion of recombinant thaumatin. Thaumatin is a sweet-tasting protein with high potential to serve as a substitute for sugars or commonly used sweeteners.

    5. Modeling microalgae cultivation productivities in different geographic locations – estimation method for idealized photobioreactors (pages 546–557)

      Anette Franz, Florian Lehr, Clemens Posten and Georg Schaub

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201000379

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      Microalgae can be used to produce versatile high-value biofuels. The productivity of microalgal biomass is strongly influenced by local climate conditions (e.g. solar irradiation, temperature). In this study, the authors develop a mathematical model for an idealized closed photobioreactor to compare locations in different climate regions for microalgae cultivation – they show that regions with high irradiation and low temperature fluctuations yielded the highest biomass productivity.

    6. Porcine parvovirus removal using trimer and biased hexamer peptides (pages 558–565)

      Caryn L. Heldt, Patrick V. Gurgel, Lee-Ann Jaykus and Dr. Ruben G. Carbonell

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201000397

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      Small trimeric peptides were found to bind and remove the porcine parvovirus (PPV) from complex solutions containing human blood plasma. To improve the removal efficiency of these small peptides, the authors have created a biased library of hexamer peptides that contains two previously reported trimeric peptides designated WRW and KYY. Based on simulated docking experiments, it appears that hexamer peptide binding is dictated more by secondary structure, whereas the binding of trimeric peptides is dominated by charge and hydrophobicity.

  11. Rapid Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
    1. YAP1 over-expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhances glutathione accumulation at its biosynthesis and substrate availability levels (pages 566–568)

      Kerti Orumets, Kaspar Kevvai, Ildar Nisamedtinov, Tiina Tamm and Toomas Paalme

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100363

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      Microbiological production of glutathione using genetically engineered yeast strains has a potential to satisfy the increasing industrial demand of this tripeptide. In this work, the authors study the accumulation of glutathione in response to YAP1 over-expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The over-expression of this single gene increases the intracellular pools of cysteine as well as the two enzymatic reactions leading to intracellular GSH accumulation.

  12. Biotech Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
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      The structuring of GMO release and evaluation in EU law (pages 569–581)

      Caroline von Kries and Prof. Gerd Winter

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100321

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      Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and their behavior in the environment are complex and can only be assessed if the different components are distinguished. This article examines, how by EU law the real causation processes from the GMO release to various endpoints are dissected, individually analysed and then again viewed in their entirety. In addition, the articles includes, how the intellectual process of assessment is divided into the steps of tiered generation, shared submission and structured evaluation of relevant knowledge. The framework proposed for such an examination allows to identify strengths and weaknesses of GMO risk assessment in the EU.

  13. Meetings

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Review
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Biotech Highlight
    14. Meetings
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      Meetings and Conferences: Biotechnology Journal 4/2012 (pages 582–583)

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201290022

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