Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 11

Special Issue: Asian Federation of Biotechnology (AFOB)

November 2013

Volume 8, Issue 11

Pages 1246–1363

  1. Cover Picture

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    4. Editorial
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    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Meetings
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      Asian Federation of Biotechnology (AFOB)

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390053

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      This issue is the first official special issue of Biotechnology Journal with the Asian Federation of Biotechnology (AFOB). In the cover, we use the grain as a symbol and analogy for biotechnology, as both the grain and biotechnology are common and uniting factors that link the member countries of the AFOB. Gran image credit: © Myimagine– Fotolia.com.

  2. Editorial Board

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      Editorial Board: Biotechnology Journal 11/2013

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390057

  3. Editorial

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      Editorial: Biotechnology Journal in Asia – the first official AFOB special issue (pages 1246–1248)

      Prof. Tai Hyun Park and Prof. George Guo-Qiang Chen

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300415

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      The first AFOB special issue of Biotechnology Journal is edited by Prof. Tai Hyun Park and Prof. George G. Q. Chen. The eleven articles are representative of the diverse nature of biotechnology today, covering topics such as microfluidic devices, high-throughput analysis, biosensors, bio-imaging, tissue engineering, vaccination, gene delivery, gene expression, and cell-free protein synthesis.

  4. In this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
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      In this issue (page 1250)

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390054

  5. Contents

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    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
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      Contents: Biotechnology Journal 11/2013 (pages 1251–1252)

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390055

  6. BiotecVisions

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    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
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    7. BiotecVisions
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  7. Forum

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      Book review – Atlas of Living Cell Cultures (page 1257)

      R. Ian Freshney

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300324

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      The latest book “Atlas of Living Cell Cultures” by Toni Lindl and Rosemarie Steubing provides a clear message to those working with cell cultures: “look at your cells and make sure that they conform to the appearance expected at the stage of culture”... read more about the book in this book review by Ian Freshney.

  8. Reviews

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    1. Organ-on-a-chip technology and microfluidic whole-body models for pharmacokinetic drug toxicity screening (pages 1258–1266)

      Jong Bum Lee and Dr. Jong Hwan Sung

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300086

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      Microfluidic systems provide a cellular microenvironment that is close to the in vivo tissue environment, while enabling the simulation of multi-organ interactions. This review discusses the application of microfluidic systems in pharmacokinetic-based drug toxicity testing.

    2. Microfluidic-integrated biosensors: Prospects for point-of-care diagnostics (pages 1267–1279)

      Suveen Kumar, Saurabh Kumar, Md. Azahar Ali, Dr. Pinki Anand, Ved Varun Agrawal, Dr. Renu John, Sagar Maji and Prof. Bansi D. Malhotra

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200386

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      Biosensors integrated with microfluidics provide a miniaturized platform with many advantages, such as reduced sample volume and low reagent consumption. This review focuses on the latest advancements in the fields of microfluidic biosensing technologies, and on the challenges and possible solutions for translating this technology into point-of-care diagnostic applications.

    3. Imaging and tracing of intracellular metabolites utilizing genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors (pages 1280–1291)

      Chang Zhang, Zi-Han Wei and Prof. Bang-Ce Ye

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300001

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      In the past few decades, genetically encoded biosensors have been developed into a powerful toolkit for non-invasive and real-time tracking of intracellular metabolites. This toolkit enables us to transform metabolic information into optical signals which can be easily detected. This review covers the recent advances in the use of genetically encoded biosensors (including RNA-based biosensors) for tracking key intracellular metabolites, and discusses biosensor construction for specific metabolites.

    4. Applications of cell-free protein synthesis in synthetic biology: Interfacing bio-machinery with synthetic environments (pages 1292–1300)

      Kyung-Ho Lee and Dr. Dong-Myung Kim

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200385

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      With the ability to harness the synthetic power of biology without many of the constraints of cell-based systems, cell-free protein synthesis enables the rapid creation of protein molecules from diverse sources of genetic information. In this review, the authors discuss the flexibility of cell-free protein synthesis, which allows this technology to be combined with various analytical platforms for the rapid functional analysis of genomic sequences.

    5. Current developments in high-throughput analysis for microalgae cellular contents (pages 1301–1314)

      Tsung-Hua Lee, Jo-Shu Chang and Dr. Hsiang-Yu Wang

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200391

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      Recent developments in high-throughput analysis methods for microalgae cellular contents are summarized in this review. These methods are categorized by their targets: lipids/fatty acids, pigments, proteins/peptides, and other high-value products such as phytohormones and antioxidants. The future prospects and impacts of these detection methods in microalgae-related processing and industries are also addressed.

  9. Research Articles

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    1. Heterologous prime-boost immunization regimens using adenovirus vector and virus-like particles induce broadly neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 avian influenza viruses (pages 1315–1322)

      Shih-Chang Lin, Wen-Chun Liu, Yu-Fen Lin, Yu-Hsuan Huang, Jin-Hwang Liu and Prof. Suh-Chin Wu

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300116

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      Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses continue to trigger severe diseases in poultry and humans. In this article, the authors use a heterologous prime-boost regimen with an adenovirus vector encoding HA (rAd-HA) and a flagellin-containing virus-like particle (FliC-VLP) to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies against homologous and heterologous clades of H5N1 virus strains. These results provide useful information supporting the development of more effective H5N1 vaccines. © image: mouse, usbfco – Fotolia.com.

    2. Repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp peptide as a cell-stimulating agent on electrospun poly(ϵ-caprolactone) scaffold for tissue engineering (pages 1323–1331)

      Pacharaporn Chaisri, Artit Chingsungnoen and Prof. Sineenat Siri

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300191

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      Most electrospun scaffolds derived from synthetic polymers contain suitable architecture to support cell hosting, but have a suboptimal cell-material interaction. In this work, the repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp (rRGD) peptide was proposed as a cell-stimulating agent to graft onto the scaffold, producing a bioactive scaffold for cell adhesion and proliferation. These bioactive scaffolds will be useful as cell substratum for tissue engineering.

    3. Global gene expression analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown under redox potential-controlled very-high-gravity conditions (pages 1332–1340)

      Chen-Guang Liu, Prof. Yen-Han Lin and Prof. Feng-Wu Bai

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300127

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      Redox potential (ORP) plays a pivotal role in yeast viability and ethanol production during very-high-gravity (VHG) ethanol fermentation. The authors report a time-course gene expression anaylsis of yeast cell by microarray. Based on the expression profiles of 4972 genes at 8 time points, overall gene expressions at neighboring time is analyzed, and specific investigation in carbohydrate metabolism and stress response were undertaken in order to identify some genes related to redox potential such as PYK2, PDC6, ADH2 and GPD2.

    4. Automated formation of multicomponent-encapuslating vesosomes using continuous flow microcentrifugation (pages 1341–1346)

      Huisoo Jang, Peichi C. Hu, Sungho Jung, Won Young Kim, Sun Min Kim, Noah Malmstadt and Dr. Tae-Joon Jeon

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200388

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      Vesosomes – hierarchical assemblies consisting of membrane-bound vesicles of various scales – are potentially powerful models of cellular compartmentalization. The authors report an automated vesosome formation platform using a microfluidic device and a continuous flow microcentrifuge. The method employed in this work is simple and can be readily applied to a variety of systems, providing a facile platform for fabricating multicomponent carriers, model cells, etc.

    5. Size and CT density of iodine-containing ethosomal vesicles obtained by membrane extrusion: Potential for use as CT contrast agents (pages 1347–1353)

      Bomin Na, Byoung Wook Choi and Dr. Bumsang Kim

      Article first published online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300110

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      Computed tomography (CT) is the primary non-invasive imaging technique for most patients with suspected liver disease. In this study, the authors investigate the encapsulation of iodine within ethosomal vesicles, as potential CT contrast agents, in order to improve liver-specific imaging properties and prevent toxic effects. Iodine was entrapped within ethosomal vesicles, giving the ethosomes a relatively high CT density, and the extrusion technique produced ethosomal vesicles with a desired size. In addition, iodine-containing ethosomes showed no cellular toxicity. Therefore, ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents for applications in CT imaging.

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      Site-targeted non-viral gene delivery by direct DNA injection into the pancreatic parenchyma and subsequent in vivo electroporation in mice (pages 1355–1361)

      Prof. Masahiro Sato, Emi Inada, Issei Saitoh, Masato Ohtsuka, Shingo Nakamura, Takayuki Sakurai and Satoshi Watanabe

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300169

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      Direct injection of plasmid DNA into the pancreatic parenchyma and subsequent in vivo electroporation confer efficient transfection of pancreatic cells. This novel gene delivery method may be useful for the development of gene therapy strategies for pancreatic diseases as well as for examination of specific gene functions in situ.

  10. Meetings

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