Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 2

Special Issue: Nanobio vs. Bionano

February 2013

Volume 8, Issue 2

Pages 157–274, A1–A8

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Research Article
    14. Meetings
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      Cover Picture: Biotechnology Journal 2/2013

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390006

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Special issue: Nanobio vs. bionano

      As researchers develop capabilities to engineer and manipulate objects and systems at ever-diminishing scales, we are now entering the realm of scientific discoveries at the nano-level. One such invention is pictured on the cover of this Special Issue, edited by François Baneyx (University of Washington, USA) and Je-Kyun Park (KAIST, Korea), showing a single-cell-sized neural electrode with unique gold nanograin structures in the beautiful shape of a sunflower.

      Image: © Yoonkey Nam

  2. Editorial Board

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    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
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    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
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      Editorial Board: Biotechnology Journal 2/2013 (page 157)

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390010

  3. Editorial

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    7. BiotecVisions
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      Editorial: Nanobio versus Bionano – what's in a name? (pages 158–159)

      Prof. François Baneyx and Prof. Je-Kyun Park

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200407

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      Nanobio versus Bionano – what's in a name?

      This special Issue of Biotechnology Journal includes two sections, one featuring articles on nanobio, the other articles on bionano. The editors of the issue, François Baneyx and Je-Kyun Park discuss the similarities and differencesbetween the two in their editorial.

  4. In this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Research Article
    14. Meetings
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  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Research Article
    14. Meetings
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      Contents: Biotechnology Journal 2/2013 (pages 161–162)

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390008

  6. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Research Article
    14. Meetings
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  7. Forum

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    7. BiotecVisions
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    10. Reviews
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    12. Rapid Communication
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  8. Commentary

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      Functional nanoscale biomolecular materials (pages 165–166)

      Prof. Jonathan S. Dordick

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200338

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      Various approaches have been developed to exploit the functional properties of proteins and the structural properties of nanoscale materials. These range from biomolecule-nanomaterial hybrids and biocatalytically-generated self-assembled amphiphiles to protein-based structural templates. This commentary by Jonathan Dordick, discusses the article by Douglas Clark and colleagues, in which the authors report a study on the extremophilic protein γ-prefoldin (γPFD).

  9. Reviews

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    7. BiotecVisions
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    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Research Article
    14. Meetings
    1. Arrayed cellular environments for stem cells and regenerative medicine (pages 167–179)

      Drew M. Titmarsh, Huaying Chen, Ernst J. Wolvetang and Prof. Justin J. Cooper-White

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200149

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      Arrayed cellular environments for stem cells and regenerative medicine are reviewed in this article, focusing on recent key developments in platforms that allow deposition of niche biomolecules, fluidic platforms that provide spatiotemporal variation of soluble stimuli, and platforms that allow capture and/or interrogation of single cells. These platforms have the capability to provide an unprecedented understanding of the molecular and cellular events that underlie expansion and specification of stem cell and therapeutic cell populations, and thus lead to successful regenerative medicine.

    2. Microfluidic systems: A new toolbox for pluripotent stem cells (pages 180–191)

      Sasha Cai Lesher-Perez, John P. Frampton and Prof. Shuichi Takayama

      Article first published online: 1 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200206

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      Conventional culture systems are often limited in their ability to regulate the growth and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. In this review, the authors describe technologies that move small volumes of fluids (on microscales) and how they can be used with stem cells. These technologies can provide precise signals that control stem cells, causing them to self-renew (produce more stem cells) or differentiate (become any of the cells in the body). They can also be used to investigate the biology of stem cells and test their quality for medical applications. These powerful tools could one day be used to combat degenerative diseases.

    3. Microfluidic tools for developmental studies of small model organisms –nematodes, fruit flies, and zebrafish (pages 192–205)

      Hyundoo Hwang and Prof. Hang Lu

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200129

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      Studying genetics of development with small model organisms such as zebrafish (Danio rerio), the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), and the soil-dwelling nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans), provides unique opportunities for understanding related processes and diseases in humans. There have been sweeping developments of microfabrication and microfluidic technologies for manipulating and imaging small objects, which allow high-throughput quantitative biological studies. Here, the authors review recent progress in microfluidic tools and applications.

  10. Research Articles

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    12. Rapid Communication
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    14. Meetings
    1. Gold nanograin microelectrodes for neuroelectronic interfaces (pages 206–214)

      Raeyoung Kim, Nari Hong and Prof. Yoonkey Nam

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200219

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      Gold nanograin microelectrodes for neuroelectronic interface: to record and stimulate nerve cells, metal microelectrodes have been popularly used. This work reports the fabrication of novel gold nanostructure microelectrodes, which improve neuroelectronic interfaces with regards to sensitivity and specificity. The nanostructured microelectrodes show low electrical impedance level and high charge injection limit, which is highly desirable for neural recording and stimulation.

    2. Self-assembled DNA-based giant thrombin nanoparticles for controlled release (pages 215–220)

      Jong Hwan Sung, Daehoon Han and Prof. Jong Bum Lee

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200312

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      Giant thrombin nanoparticle for efficient thrombin delivery: in this study, the authors report a novel method for thrombin delivery by forming giant thrombin nanoparticles based on DNA nanostructures. Through strong binding between thrombins and multivalent aptamers on DNA nanostructures, giant thrombin nanoparticles were generated. These nanoparticles can perform controlled release of thrombins by introducing complementary DNA.

    3. An autonomously self-assembling dendritic DNA nanostructure for target DNA detection (pages 221–227)

      Harish Chandran, Abhijit Rangnekar, Geetha Shetty, Erik A. Schultes, John H. Reif and Prof. Thomas H. LaBean

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100499

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      Responsive and programmable DNA nanostructures have shown great promise as chemical detection systems. In this study, the authors describe a DNA detection system by using a metastable mixture of DNA hairpins (α and β) to detect the target DNA strand (T1). The target binds to and opens the first hairpin which then exponentially binds and opens the other hairpins, thus triggering a dendrimer formation. The system was further tested with HIV and Chlamydia trachomatis pathogens with positive results. This method offers an inexpensive and convenient method for detecting pathogenic DNA.

    4. Engineering protein filaments with enhanced thermostability for nanomaterials (pages 228–236)

      Dominic J. Glover, Lars Giger, Jihyun R. Kim and Prof. Douglas S. Clark

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200009

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      Self-assembling protein templates have enormous potential as biomaterials for the fabrication of multifunctional nanostructures that require precise positioning of individual molecules in regular patterns over large surface areas. Furthermore, the development of ultrastable protein templates will expand processing conditions and end-use applications for biomaterials that require exceptional robustness. In this article, the authors characterize the high thermal stability of a filamentous protein template, the γ-prefoldin, and subsequently use rational design to further enhance the filament's thermal stability for application as a biotemplate in the creation of platinum nanowires.

    5. Biologically inspired strategy for programmed assembly of viral building blocks with controlled dimensions (pages 237–246)

      Jennifer M. Rego, Jae-Hun Lee, David H. Lee and Prof. Hyunmin Yi

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100504

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      Biologically inspired fabrication of nanoscale building blocks with controlled dimensions is demonstrated by exploiting the self-assembly of tobacco mosaic virus coat proteins with in vitro transcribed RNA templates that govern the assembly length. Results indicate highly consistent and uniform building block lengths as well as chemical reactivity, showing significant potential for practical applications in controlled fabrication of functional nanomaterials.

    6. Bionanotechnology application of polypeptides in a hair color product: Self-assembly enables expression, processing, and functionality (pages 247–256)

      Pierre E. Rouvière, Jing Li, Donald J. Brill, Lisa D. Reiss, Timothy R. Schwartz, Lisa A. Butterick, Stephen R. Fahnestock and Dr. Tanja Gruber

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200008

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      It remains a major challenge to develop bionanotechnology applications for industrial-scale production, in large part due to issues of scale-up feasibility and cost of production of the materials. In this article, the authors design a system to anchor particles, e.g. pigments, onto hair via a multifunctional polypeptide that is able to self-assemble into higher order structures. At the same time they incorporate characteristics that allow efficient production in E. coli. Co-engineering of production, system assembly and system functionality of the biological material leads to high performance, while at the same time being cost-effective and scalable.

  11. Rapid Communication

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    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Rapid Communication
    13. Research Article
    14. Meetings
    1. Size-modulated synergy of cellulase clustering for enhanced cellulose hydrolysis (pages 257–261)

      Shen-Long Tsai, Miso Park and Dr. Wilfred Chen

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100503

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      Enzyme-clustering is a promising method for improving the efficiencies of sequential enzymatic reactions and has been successfully demonstrated for a wide range of applications including biodegradation and biofuel production. The current study demonstrates a systematic approach to dissect the size effect of nanoparticles on immobilized enzyme activity. As the integrative field of nanobiotechnology is gaining more interest, this information is useful in designing improved nanobiocatalysts for biofuel production, bioremediation and drug design.

  12. Research Article

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    1. Addressable self-immobilization of lactate dehydrogenase across multiple length scales (pages 262–272)

      Sibel Cetinel, H. Burak Caliskan, Deniz T. Yucesoy, A. Senem Donatan, Esra Yuca, Mustafa Urgen, Nevin G. Karaguler and Prof. Candan Tamerler

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201100502

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      Inorganic-binding peptide tags provide a singk-step approach for self-organization of enzymes on solid surfaces. In this article, gold-binding peptide (AuBP2) was genetically incorporated to L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Enhanced enzymatic activity was observed on a variety of gold surfaces ranging from nanoparticles to electrodes. Redox catalysis efficiency obtained by the immobilized fusion enzyme suggests that the proposed peptide-mediated path could be extended to a variety of applications.

  13. Meetings

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    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
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    12. Rapid Communication
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