Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 3

Special Issue: Strategies in Tissue Engineering

March 2013

Volume 8, Issue 3

Pages 277–384, A1–A8

  1. Cover Picture

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    4. Editorial
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    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
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    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Report
    13. Research Articles
    14. Meetings
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      Strategies in Tissue Engineering

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390011

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      Tissue engineering is an integrative field that combines knowledge from several disciplines such as cell biology, biochemistry, medicine, and material sciences. The cover of this Special Issue on Strategies in Tissue Engineering – showing, an organ, a tissue sample, a bioreactor and a DNA strand, represents the holistic nature of this discipline and the multitude of expertise necessary to drive it forward. Forming the background to the image is the Würzburg Residence, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Bavaria, Germany, and the location of the 3rd International Conferences “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”. © Katja Schenke-Layland.

  2. Editorial Board

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      Editorial Board: Biotechnology Journal 3/2013 (page 277)

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390015

  3. Editorial

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      Editorial: Strategies in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (pages 278–279)

      Prof. Katja Schenke-Layland and Prof. Heike Walles

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300043

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      “Strategies in Tissue Engineering”: this special issue is edited by Prof. Katja Schenke-Layland and Prof. Heike Walles and covers many salient aspects of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The issue includes articles on Raman spectroscopy and its application in tissue engineering; bioreactor design and surface functionalization for tissue culture applications; improved method for RNA isolation from tissue samples and much more.

  4. In this issue

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    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Forum
    9. Commentary
    10. Reviews
    11. Research Articles
    12. Technical Report
    13. Research Articles
    14. Meetings
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  5. Contents

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      Contents: Biotechnology Journal 3/2013 (pages 281–282)

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390013

  6. BiotecVisions

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  7. Forum

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      Meeting report: Synthetic Biology Symposium Cold Spring Harbor Asia (pages 284–285)

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200392

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      The Synthetic Biology Symposium of Cold Spring Harbor Asia was held at the Suzhou Dushu Lake Conference Center, China, on Nov 26–30, 2012. Read this meeting report by Hongyu Zhao for highlights of the meeting. Image provided by CSH Asia.

  8. Commentary

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  9. Reviews

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      Raman spectroscopy in biomedicine – non-invasive in vitro analysis of cells and extracellular matrix components in tissues (pages 288–297)

      Eva Brauchle and Prof. Katja Schenke-Layland

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200163

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      Raman spectroscopy in biomedicine: this review article reflects the current progress towards the expanding applicability of Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of living cells and tissues. This laser-based technology provides a non-invasive and fast approach for the identification of pathogenic microorganisms, new possibilities for cell screenings, real-time cell culture monitoring and the characterization of malignant cells. Furthermore, the molecular information, which is concealed in Raman spectra, catches shifts of the collagen and proteoglycan organization in tissues.

    2. Bioreactors in tissue engineering—principles, applications and commercial constraints (pages 298–307)

      Dr. Jan Hansmann, Florian Groeber, Alexander Kahlig, Claudia Kleinhans and Heike Walles

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200162

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      Bioreactor systems play a vital role within tissue engineering processes. For tissue generation, typically a scaffold is seeded with cells and subsequently cultured in a bioreactor system. Bioreactors provide controlled culture conditions such as a continuous nutrient supply and waste product removal as well as tissue-specific physiological cues to guide tissue growth and development. Moreover, bioreactor systems have the potential to improve the applicability of tissue engineering processes and thus, can help to translate basic tissue engineering research knowledge into alternative strategies to classical donor organs and animal testing.

  10. Research Articles

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    1. A bioreactor system for interfacial culture and physiological perfusion of vascularized tissue equivalents (pages 308–316)

      Florian Groeber, Alexander Kahlig, Steffan Loff, Heike Walles and Jan Hansmann

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200160

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      Bioreactor for tissue engineering applications: human dermal microvascular endothelial (hDMEC) cells can be seeded in to the arterial inflow of a biological vascularized scaffold based on a decellularized porcine jejunal segment and cultured in a bioreactor system. This bioreactor system provides a pulsatile perfusion of the vasculature and the culture of the tissue equivalent at the interface between different culture conditions, which results in the recolonization of the perfused vessels by hDMEC.

    2. A tissue-engineered human dermal construct utilizing fibroblasts and transforming growth factor β1 to promote elastogenesis (pages 317–326)

      Nadine Sommer, Martin Sattler, Julia M. Weise, Horst Wenck, Stefan Gallinat and Dr. Frank Fischer

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200209

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      Elastic fiber cell culture skin model: in this study, the authors demonstrate that it is possible to provide a 3D elastic fiber network in a cell culture model using skin cells by adding the right ingredients (e.g. a tissue growth factor, such as TGF-β1). The elastic fiber model may serve as the basis for various investigations on elastic fiber assembly, cross-linking or degradation for regenerative tissue engineering of elastic soft tissues.

    3. Ammonia plasma treatment of polystyrene surfaces enhances proliferation of primary human mesenchymal stem cells and human endothelial cells (pages 327–337)

      Dr. Claudia Kleinhans, Jakob Barz, Simone Wurster, Marleen Willig, Christian Oehr, Michael Müller, Heike Walles, Thomas Hirth and Petra J. Kluger

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200210

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      Plasma modification, especially amino functionalization, influence cell adhesion and proliferation. Ammonia, acrylic acid and carbon dioxide plasma was applied on polystyrene to chemically modify the sample surface and evaluate how this affects cell behaviour. The studies were performed with primary human mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial cells and revealed an enhanced adhesion and proliferation rate on amino-modified surfaces.

  11. Technical Report

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    1. RNA isolation from fetal and adult human tissues for transcriptional profiling (pages 338–344)

      Miriam Votteler, Shannon L. Layland, Georgia Lill, Kelvin G. M. Brockbank, Alexander Horke and Katja Schenke-Layland

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200164

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      Human tissues are routinely accessible as either formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples or cryopreserved homografts. Due to tissue scarcity, new strategies are required to enable developmental studies using human fetal and adult tissues. In this article, the authors report methodological improvements for comparative whole genome expression analysis of pretreated tissues.

  12. Research Articles

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    1. Strategies for biological heart valve replacement: Stentless xenografts fail to evolve into an alternative pulmonary valve substitute in a Ross procedure (pages 345–351)

      Dr. Timo Weimar, Detlef Roser, Markus Liebrich, Alexander Horke, Nicolas Doll and Wolfgang B. Hemmer

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200288

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      A shortage of pulmonary homograft for the reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract in a Ross procedure supports the need to find alternative graft solutions. This study examines stentless xenografts as a potential candidate. Echocardiographic velocity measurements revealed significant higher gradients across the valve of stentless xenografts when compared to pulmonary homografts with an increased risk for the need of reoperation and is therefore not an acceptable substitute.

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      Continuous purification of antibodies from cell culture supernatant with aqueous two-phase systems: From concept to process (pages 352–362)

      Paula A. J. Rosa, Dr. Ana M. Azevedo, S. Sommerfeld, Martina Mutter, Werner Bäcker and Prof. M. Raquel Aires-Barros

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200031

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      Continuous extraction of monoclonal antibodies in a mixer settler battery: a continuous aqueous two-phase extraction process incorporating three different steps (extraction, back-extraction and washing) was set up and successfully applied to the capture of human immunoglobulin G from both Chinese hamster ovary and PER.C6® cell supernatants in a pump mixer-settler battery. The results obtained open promising perspectives for the application of the developed ATPE process as a platform technology for antibody capture.

    3. Gastrointestinal absorption and metabolism of apple polyphenols ex vivo by the pig intestinal mucosa in the Ussing chamber (pages 363–370)

      Hannah Deußer, Dorothee Rogoll, Wolfgang Scheppach, Antje Volk, Ralph Melcher and Prof. Dr. Elke Richling

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200303

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      Polyphenols are linked to various positive effects on human health. The absorption and metabolism of polyphenols in intestinal tract needs to be studied in order to estimate these effects. In this study, authors use the Ussing chamber technique to investigate the transport behavior of apple polyphenols through the pig small intestinal mucosa. They demonstrate that Ussing chamber utilizing pig small intestinal mucosa is a suitable model for assessing the effect of apple polyphenols on mucosal integrity and nutrition absorption across porcine mucosa.

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      Expression of functionally active sialylated human erythropoietin in plants (pages 371–382)

      Jakub Jez, Alexandra Castilho, Josephine Grass, Karola Vorauer-Uhl, Thomas Sterovsky, Friedrich Altmann and Prof. Herta Steinkellner

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200363

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      Plants are attractive hosts for the production of recombinant proteins as they are virtually free of human pathogens, provide an almost unlimited scale-up capacity and can carry out posttranslational modifications similar to mammalian cells. In this article, the authors present a new method that enables Nicotiana benthamiana plants to produce sialylated recombinant human erythropoietin – a drug that is widely used to treat anemia. The production speed and flexible glyco-engineering system provide advantages compared to conventional mammalian cell-based expression systems. This plant-based production platform can be used for the production of recombinant biopharmaceuticals with a highly defined glycosylation pattern.

  13. Meetings

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