Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 4

Special Issue: Stem cell engineering

April 2013

Volume 8, Issue 4

Pages 389–503, A1–A8

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Commentary
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Rapid Communication
    12. Meetings
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      Stem cell engineering

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390016

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      Stem cell engineering – edited by Brenda M. Ogle and Sean P. Palecek

      While stem cells hold great promise for novel therapeutic strategies, our ability to harvest his potential depends on our ability to manipulate stem cells for our needs. The cover of this special issue on Stem cell engineering shows muscle cells undergoing differentiation, where mRNAs encoding early (green) and late (red) markers of differentiation are labeled by single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization. This is one method in the current repertoire of tools developed to understand the complexities of stem cells and explore their potential applications.

  2. Editorial Board

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    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Commentary
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Rapid Communication
    12. Meetings
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  3. Editorial

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    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
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    7. BiotecVisions
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    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Rapid Communication
    12. Meetings
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      Editorial: Stem cell engineering – discovery, diagnostics and therapies (pages 390–391)

      Prof. Brenda M. Ogle and Prof. Sean P. Palecek

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300114

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      Stem cell engineering – discovery, diagnostics and therapies: This Special Issue is edited by Brenda Ogle and Sean Palecek and is based on presentations from the Third International Conference on Stem Cell Engineering, co-sponsored by the Society of Biological Engineering and the International Society for Stem Cell Research, held in Seattle, WA from April 29-May 2, 2012.

  4. In this issue

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Commentary
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Rapid Communication
    12. Meetings
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      In this issue (page 392)

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201390017

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Commentary
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Rapid Communication
    12. Meetings
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  6. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Commentary
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Rapid Communication
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      BiotecVisions 2013, April (pages A1–A8)

      Version of Record online: 26 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300007

  7. Commentary

    1. Top of page
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    5. In this issue
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    7. BiotecVisions
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      Studying cell-cell communication in co-culture (pages 395–396)

      Danielle R. Bogdanowicz and Prof. Helen H. Lu

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300054

  8. Reviews

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    7. BiotecVisions
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    12. Meetings
    1. The role of single-cell analyses in understanding cell lineage commitment (pages 397–407)

      Tyler M. Gibson and Prof. Charles A. Gersbach

      Version of Record online: 21 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200201

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      Single-cell analyses provide detailed information about cell behavior in a heterogeneous population. Conventional biochemical assays used to study cell lineage commitment make average measurements of thousands to millions of cells and therefore fail to capture the distinct behaviors exhibited by individual cells within the population. This review discusses how single-cell biochemical assays have enabled a deeper understanding of divergent cell responses to differentiation and reprogramming stimuli.

    2. Convergent mechanisms in pluripotent stem cells and cancer: Implications for stem cell engineering (pages 408–419)

      Bridget M. Mooney, Nurazhani Abdul Raof, Yan Li and Yubing Xie

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200202

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      Embryonic stem cells and malignant cancer cells share certain anatomical and physiological characteristics. The convergence of pluripotent stem cells and cancer cells at cellular communication and signaling level provides opportunities to restrict cancer malignancy. Stem cell engineering has great potential to explore stem cell-cancer cell interactions, elucidate new therapeutic factors, and reprogram cancer cells to a less aggressive phenotype, leading to better understanding, prevention, and treatment of cancer.

    3. Trophoblast differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (pages 421–433)

      Karthik Tiruthani, Prasenjit Sarkar and Dr. Balaji Rao

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200203

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      The trophectoderm (TE) is a multipotent progenitor capable of differentiating into all trophoblast cell types in the placenta. Molecular mechanisms regulating human trophoblast differentiation remain poorly understood due to difficulties in obtaining primary tissues from very early developmental stages in humans. Therefore the use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a source for generating trophoblast tissues is of significant interest. In this review, the authors provide an overview of efforts made in obtaining trophoblasts from hESCs.

    4. Perivascular cells in blood vessel regeneration (pages 434–447)

      Maureen Wanjare, Sravanti Kusuma and Dr. Sharon Gerecht

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200199

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      Perivascular cells, which include vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes, are a critical component of functioning vasculature and thus an important building block for vascular tissue engineering. Because understanding distinctions between perivascular cell types could enable improved therapeutics, in this review the authors compare and contrast these perivascular cell types and discuss the approaches and challenges facing the use of perivascular cells in vascular regeneration.

  9. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
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    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
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    9. Reviews
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    11. Rapid Communication
    12. Meetings
    1. Human mesenchymal stem cells from the umbilical cord matrix: Successful isolation and ex vivo expansion using serum-/xeno-free culture media (pages 448–458)

      Irina N. Simões, Joana S. Boura, Francisco dos Santos, Pedro Z. Andrade, Carla M. P. Cardoso, Jeffrey M. Gimble, Cláudia L. da Silva and Prof. Joaquim M. S. Cabral

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200340

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      The current study demonstrates the feasibility of isolating human mesenchymal stem cells from the umbilical cord matrix (UCM-MSC) using enzymatic digestion and serum-/xeno-free culture media (success rate of 100%). Compared with mesenchymal stem cells from adult sources, the isolated cells show similar immunophenotype and multilineage differentiation potential, while having a higher expansion potential. The isolation and expansion of MSC under serum-/xeno-free culture conditions contributes towards the development of safer and more effective MSC-based cellular products, boosting the use of MSCs in clinical settings.

    2. A quantitative approach for understanding small-scale human mesenchymal stem cell culture – implications for large-scale bioprocess development (pages 459–471)

      Qasim A. Rafiq, Karen Coopman , Alvin W. Nienow and Prof. Christopher J. Hewitt

      Version of Record online: 28 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200197

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      A quantitative approach for understanding small-scale human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) culture is required to obtain an accurate reflection of culture conditions and establish a means for process engineering development. Key bioprocess parameters such as dissolved oxygen and metabolite concentrations are crucial for various cellular parameters, in this case, hMSC proliferation. This study demonstrates the importance of determining optimal culture conditions for hMSC expansion and highlights potential cost savings from only making a 50% medium exchange, which may prove significant for large-scale bioprocessing.

    3. Mesenchymal stem cell durotaxis depends on substrate stiffness gradient strength (pages 472–484)

      Ludovic G. Vincent, Yu Suk Choi, Baldomero Alonso-Latorre, Juan C. del Álamo and Prof. Adam J. Engler

      Version of Record online: 28 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200205

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      Migration speed of human mesenchymal stem cells up stiffness gradients is gradient magnitude-dependent: in this article, the authors demonstrate that migration velocity of mesenchymal stem cells (shown in green) up stiffness gradients correlates directly with gradient strength but is drastically reduced in the presence of contractile antagonists and microtubule depolymerizing agents. These results suggest that orchestrated cytoskeletal dynamics and traction forces are crucial for directed cell migration and that in vivo, MSCs may have a more significant contribution to repairs in stiffer regions, such as fibrotic lesions, where they may preferentially accumulate.

    4. Development of 3D hydrogel culture systems with on-demand cell separation (pages 485–495)

      Sharon K. Hamilton, Nathaniel C. Bloodworth, Christopher S. Massad, Taymour M. Hammoudi, Shalu Suri, Peter J. Yang, Dr. Hang Lu and Dr. Johnna S. Temenoff

      Version of Record online: 28 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200200

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      Fabrication of 3D co-culture systems with on-demand separability to examine cell-cell signaling: using a combination of non-degradable hydrogels laminated together with enzyme-sensitive “glues”, the authors produced a co-culture system with complex geometry without sacrificing cell viability due to either the lamination or de-lamination process. This platform offers great potential for a variety of basic cell signaling studies while simultaneously providing tight control of contact time and geometry.

  10. Rapid Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. In this issue
    6. Contents
    7. BiotecVisions
    8. Commentary
    9. Reviews
    10. Research Articles
    11. Rapid Communication
    12. Meetings
    1. A screening approach reveals the influence of mineral coating morphology on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation (pages 496–501)

      Siyoung Choi and Prof. William L. Murphy

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200204

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      Systematic control of mineral coating morphology can regulate human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) differentiation: hMSC behavior on “bone-like” mineral coatings has been of considerable interest to the biomedical research community. The broad range of specific mineral coating parameters that influence hMSC cell behavior indicate a need for an efficient experimental platform. In this article, the authors systematically control the mineral-forming conditions and demonstrate that mineral coating morphology is a key parameter in regulating hMSC differentiation. These enhanced mineral coatings may be useful to design mineral coating properties for bone tissue engineering applications.

  11. Meetings

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