Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 1

Special Issue: Biotech Methods and Advances

January 2014

Volume 9, Issue 1

Pages 1–170

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Rapid Communication
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      Biotech Methods and Advances

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201490000

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      Our latest Biotech Methods & Advances special issue is edited by our Editors-in-Chief Prof. Alois Jungbauer and Prof. Sang Yup Lee. As always, the special issue is a collection of the latest breakthroughs in biotechnology. The cover is a graphical representation of some of the tools in biotechnology research. Image: © Bank-Bank – Fotolia.com.

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Rapid Communication
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      Editorial Board: Biotechnology Journal 1/2014 (page 1)

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201490003

  3. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Rapid Communication
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      Editorial: Latest methods and advances in biotechnology (pages 2–4)

      Prof. Sang Yup Lee and Prof. Alois Jungbauer

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300522

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      The latest “Biotech Methods and Advances” special issue of Biotechnology Journal continues the BTJ tradition of featuring the latest breakthroughs in biotechnology. The special issue is edited by our Editors-in-Chief, Prof. Sang Yup Lee and Prof. Alois Jungbauer and covers a wide array of topics in biotechnology, including the perennial favorite workhorses of the biotech industry, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell and Escherichia coli.

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      Editorial: Biotechnology Journal – a review of 2013 and a preview of 2014 (pages 4–5)

      Judy Peng

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300524

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      Biotechnology Journal completed another successful year in 2013 and looks forward to 2014. Many thanks to Dr. Pascal Loyer for winning the e-subscription prize draw and congratulations to Dr. Ravi Radhakrishnan for providing the best cover of 2013.

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Rapid Communication
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      Contents: Biotechnology Journal 1/2014 (pages 6–7)

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201490001

  5. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Rapid Communication
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  6. Forum

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Rapid Communication
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  7. Reviews

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Rapid Communication
    1. Physiologically relevant organs on chips (pages 16–27)

      Kyungsuk Yum, Soon Gweon Hong, Kevin E. Healy and Prof. Luke P. Lee

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300187

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      Traditional static cell culture models often fail to reproduce critical aspects of human physiology, because cell culture approaches can be difficult to adapt to dynamic 3D microenvironments. The authors review the recent development of microengineered physiological systems, or organs-on-chips, that reconstitute the physiologically critical features of specific human tissues and organs and their interactions.

    2. Large-scale production of red blood cells from stem cells: What are the technical challenges ahead? (pages 28–38)

      Guillaume F. Rousseau, Marie-Catherine Giarratana and Prof. Luc Douay

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200368

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      Scientists are now able to generate red blood cells from different sources of stem cells in vitro. The potential applications of this product raise many hopes, but the transfer from bench to industry has yet to occur. This article outlines the key biotechnological challenges remaining to be resolved, proposes a range of possible solutions and presents the state-of-the-art of large-scale blood production attempts in laboratories.

    3. Molecular farming of human cytokines and blood products from plants: Challenges in biosynthesis and detection of plant-produced recombinant proteins (pages 39–50)

      Nicolau B. da Cunha, Giovanni R. Vianna, Thaina da Almeida Lima and Dr. Elíbio Rech

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300062

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      Plant systems have emerged as attractive alternatives for the production of cytokines. Plant organs such as leaves, seeds and tubers have been demonstrated as suitable vehicles for the accumulation of many functional cytokines. In this review, the authors summarize the recent advances in molecular farming of cytokines and examine the technological basis, upcoming challenges and perspectives for the biosynthesis and detection of these molecules in different plant production platforms.

    4. Biomaterial and cellular properties as examined through atomic force microscopy, fluorescence optical microscopies and spectroscopic techniques (pages 51–60)

      Birgit Kainz, Ewa A. Oprzeska-Zingrebe and Prof. José L. Herrera

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300087

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      Understanding the structural properties of “soft matter systems,” which include important substances such as colloids, polymers, gels, and biological materials, remains challenging for scientists and technologists. This review describes the use of atomic force microscopy, in combination with other microscopy and spectroscopy strategies, for the study of soft matter systems. The potential impact of these techniques on material and polymer science, cell biology, biochemical engineering and protein chemistry is highlighted.

    5. Microbial heterogeneity affects bioprocess robustness: Dynamic single-cell analysis contributes to understanding of microbial populations (pages 61–72)

      Prof. Frank Delvigne and Philippe Goffin

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300119

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      Microbial population heterogeneity is recognized as the main source of disturbance for bioprocesses optimization. This review highlights the major mechanisms involved in the generation of microbial heterogeneity, as well as the main methods currently employed for monitoring these phenomena in bioprocess-related conditions.

    6. Algal biomass conversion to bioethanol – a step-by-step assessment (pages 73–86)

      Dr. Razif Harun, Jason W. S. Yip, Selvakumar Thiruvenkadam, Wan A. W. A. K. Ghani, Tamara Cherrington and Prof. Michael K. Danquah

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201200353

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      Algal biomass is a promising feedstock for bioethanol production, offering a number of advantages over currently employed energy crops. In this review, a step-wise approach to the application of algal biomass for bioethanol production is discussed, with a focus on two different fermentative conversion routes: single-stage fermentation and two-stage gasification/fermentation. Emphasis is placed on scalability for full-scale production, in order to address increasing worldwide energy demands.

  8. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
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    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Rapid Communication
    1. Recovery of Chinese hamster ovary host cell proteins for proteomic analysis (pages 87–99)

      Kristin N. Valente, Amy K. Schaefer, Hannah R. Kempton, Abraham M. Lenhoff and Prof. Kelvin H. Lee

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300190

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      Identification and characterization of extracellular Chinese hamster ovary host cell proteins are necessary in order to improve clearance of impurities from biopharmaceutical products and to ensure patient safety. Protein recovery during the complex sample preparation protocols required for analysis is paramount, as protein loss limits protein detection and subsequently decreases the utility of the analysis. This work demonstrates the broadly applicable design of experimental methods to maximize protein recovery during sample preparation, and presents optimized protocols for the recovery of extracellular host cell proteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    2. Highly sialylated recombinant human erythropoietin production in large-scale perfusion bioreactor utilizing CHO-gmt4 (JW152) with restored GnT I function (pages 100–109)

      John S. Y. Goh, Yingwei Liu, Haifeng Liu, Kah Fai Chan, Corrine Wan, Gavin Teo, Xiangshan Zhou, Fusheng Xie, Peiqing Zhang, Dr. Yuanxing Zhang and Dr. Zhiwei Song

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300301

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      Mammalian cells produce recombinant therapeutic glycoproteins with heterogeneous glycosylation. However, it is desirable for glycoproteins to be better sialylated for improved circulatory half-life and efficacy. CHO-gmt4 cells lacking N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnT I) have been shown to produce highly sialylated erythropoietin (EPO) when GnT I is functionally restored. We have generated an EPO-producing CHO cell line derived from CHO-gmt4. Analyses of the resulting EPO produced in an existing bioprocess demonstrate that the CHO-gmt4D cell line has the industrial potential for producing highly sialylated recombinant EPO and other recombinant glycoprotein therapeutics.

    3. Secretory ranalexin produced in recombinant Pichia pastoris exhibits additive or synergistic bactericidal activity when used in combination with polymyxin B or linezolid against multi-drug resistant bacteria (pages 110–119)

      Rasha Abou Aleinein, Holger Schäfer and Prof. Michael Wink

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300282

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      High-level production of inexpensive but bioactive anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) is a critical prerequisite for their potential role in overcoming multidrug-resistant pathogens. The current study shows that the yeast Pichia pastoris is a powerful and cost-effective organism for the production of bioactive and secretory ranalexin. Secretory ranalexin is an interesting candidate for bactericidal chemotherapy alone or in combination with other antibiotics.

    4. Engineering stress tolerance of Escherichia coli by stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM)-based adaptive evolution (pages 120–127)

      Linjiang Zhu, Zhen Cai, Yanping Zhang and Prof. Yin Li

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300277

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      A novel stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM)-based adaptive evolution approach, which synchronizes the mutagenesis and the selection process in a single-plate incubation step, was devised to improve microbial tolerance to environmental stresses. MMR-defective Escherichia coli exhibited a significantly increased SIM rate and improved evolutionary capability against butanol, osmotic, and heat stresses during the periodic evolution process. This approach enriches the toolbox of evolutionary engineering and can be applied to generate robust microbial strains suitable for production of fuels and chemicals from renewable resources.

    5. Mini-scale cultivation method enables expeditious plasmid production in Escherichia coli (pages 128–136)

      Petra Grunzel, Maciej Pilarek, Dörte Steinbrück, Antje Neubauer, Eva Brand, Michael U. Kumke, Peter Neubauer and Dipl. Biol. Mirja Krause

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300177

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      Simple and fast plasmid preparation is a crucial step in the study of genes and their functions. In this article, the authors describe an efficient plasmid preparation protocol in microliter scale. While the procedures currently in standard use require overnight incubation of a 2 mL sample volume, this optimized procedure requires only 6 hours of incubation and a 100 μL sample volume. This efficient protocol could be both implemented in the molecular biology laboratory and employed in automated high-throughput applications.

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      A magnetic nanobead-based bioassay provides sensitive detection of single- and biplex bacterial DNA using a portable AC susceptometer (pages 137–145)

      Dr. Mattias Strömberg, Dr. Teresa Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Mats Nilsson, Peter Svedlindh and Maria Strømme

      Article first published online: 19 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300348

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      Novel biodiagnostic principles for rapid, sensitive and cost-efficient detection of biomolecules are increasingly in demand in today's society. This manuscript describes the use of a volume-amplified magnetic nanobead detection assay (VAM-NDA) for proof-of-concept detection of biplex Vibrio cholerae and Escherichia coli targets in a portable AC susceptometer. The present findings bring commercial biodiagnostic devices relying on VAM-NDA further towards implementation in point-of-care and outpatient settings.

    7. Hydrostatic pressure and shear stress affect endothelin-1 and nitric oxide release by endothelial cells in bioreactors (pages 146–154)

      Federico Vozzi, Francesca Bianchi, Arti Ahluwalia and Dr. Claudio Domenici

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300016

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      Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) are the major endothelial biomolecules involved in regulation of endothelium function. The analysis of the effect of these two forces (shear stress and pressure generated by blood flow) acting on endothelial cell (EC) cultures in a bioreactor shows how ET-1 is pressure and flow-sensitive, while NO is mainly flow-driven.

  9. Technical Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorials
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Rapid Communication
    1. A protease substrate profiling method that links site-specific proteolysis with antibiotic resistance (pages 155–162)

      Lisa Sandersjöö, George Kostallas, Dr. John Löfblom and Patrik Samuelson

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300234

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      A method for assessment of proteolysis using survival in selective media: The method is based on linking site-specific proteolysis with antibiotic resistance. Bacteria that produce a protease able to cleave a substrate sequence will gain antibiotic resistance and thus survive under antibiotic selection pressure. This method could facilitate protease substrate identification, and holds great promise for protein engineering of proteases as well as substrates.

  10. Rapid Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
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    4. Editorials
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
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    8. Reviews
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    10. Technical Report
    11. Rapid Communication
    1. Albumin-based nanocomposite spheres for advanced drug delivery systems (pages 163–170)

      Heath E. Misak, Prof. Ramazan Asmatulu, Janani S. Gopu, Ka-Poh Man, Nora M. Zacharias, Paul H. Wooley and Dr. Shang-You Yang

      Article first published online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300150

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      A novel drug delivery system (DDS), composed of protein, biodegradable polymer, magnetic nanoparticles and therapeutic agent, was developed. Drug release studies indicated that protein release was dependent on the total protein content of the DDS. Upon hydration of the DDS, the protein in drug occlusions expands with respect to the polymer, causing restrictions in mesopore channels and thus preventing protein release. This type of DDS is a viable alternative for treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and fast-growing cancers.

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