Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 2

Special Issue: Fluorescent Biosensors

February 2014

Volume 9, Issue 2

Pages 171–310

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Technical Report
    10. Research Article
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      Fluorescent Biosensors

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201490004

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      The Fluorescent Biosensor special issue of Biotechnology Journal is edited by Dr. May Morris and Prof. Marc Blondel. The cover image is an artistic interpretation of how fluorescent biosensors function as molecular beacons for scientists navigating a sea of molecules. Image courtesy of L. Divita and R. Wintergerst.

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Technical Report
    10. Research Article
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      Editorial Board: Biotechnology Journal 2/2014

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201490005

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Technical Report
    10. Research Article
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial: Fluorescent biosensors (pages 171–173)

      Dr. May C. Morris and Prof. Marc Blondel

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201400008

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      This special issue of Biotechnology Journal on fluorescent biosensors is edited by Dr. May Morris and Prof. Marc Blondel.

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Technical Report
    10. Research Article
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Technical Report
    10. Research Article
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      BiotecVisions 2014, February

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300527

  6. Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Technical Report
    10. Research Article
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      Meeting report: 3rd Meeting of the Biosensor Workgroup of the GDR2588 (pages 178–179)

      Dr. May C. Morris and Prof. Marc Blondel

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201400006

  7. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Technical Report
    10. Research Article
    1. Newly engineered cyan fluorescent proteins with enhanced performances for live cell FRET imaging (pages 180–191)

      Fabienne Mérola, Asma Fredj, Dahdjim-Benoît Betolngar, Cornelia Ziegler, Marie Erard and Hélène Pasquier

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300198

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      Cyan fluorescent proteins are widely used as Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) donors in genetically encoded biosensors for live cell imaging and bioassays. The authors review recent advances in the genetic engineering of these cyan fluorophores and the new perspectives these advances open for FLIM (fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy) and FRET imaging applications. They also discuss some invaluable lessons learned about structure-photophysics relationships in these fluorescent proteins.

    2. Decoding spatial and temporal features of neuronal cAMP/PKA signaling with FRET biosensors (pages 192–202)

      Liliana R. V. Castro, Elvire Guiot, Marina Polito, Daniéle Paupardin-Tritsch and Pierre Vincent

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300202

    3. Imaging early signaling events in T lymphocytes with fluorescent biosensors (pages 203–212)

      Clotilde Randriamampita and Annemarie C. Lellouch

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300195

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      T cells are one of the most important players of the immune system as they are the prime effectors of cell-mediated immunity and ultimately provide the body with immunological memory. Many recent advances in T-cell biology are derived from fluorescent microscopy techniques, with which the behavior of these cells can be followed in live tissues. Here, we review a new range of research tools, namely fluorescent biosensors, which allow researchers to visualize biochemical events taking place inside living T cells as they carry out their immunological functions. These new tools should help provide further insight to this important field of research, which remains central to the study of infectious disease, autoimmune pathologies and cancer.

    4. Deciphering the spatio-temporal regulation of entry and progression through mitosis (pages 213–223)

      Lilia Gheghiani and Olivier Gavet

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300194

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      Mitosis has been studied since the early 1880s as a key event of the cell division cycle. Understanding the precise spatio-temporal contribution of each regulator in the cell reorganization process has been technically challenging. This review focuses on a number of recent advances in our understanding of the spatial distribution of protein activities and the temporal regulation of their activation and inactivation during entry and progression through mitosis by the use of intramolecular FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer)-based biosensors.

    5. Shining light on cell death processes – a novel biosensor for necroptosis, a newly described cell death program (pages 224–240)

      François Sipieter, Maria Ladik, Peter Vandenabeele and Franck Riquet

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300200

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      The importance of cell death programs in physiological and pathological contexts led scientists to devise approaches to identify, characterize, and discriminate between different cell death modalities. This review covers the mechanisms of cell death and the approaches used to study this process, from the biochemical techniques first employed to more recent fluorogenic techniques, which can provide dynamical information. The implications of fluorogenic approaches for the study of cell death at both the fundamental research level and for therapeutic applications are discussed.

    6. Advances in lanthanide-based luminescent peptide probes for monitoring the activity of kinase and phosphatase (pages 241–252)

      Elena Pazos and M. Eugenio Vázquez

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300203

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      Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play critical roles in many signaling events within cells. Methods for monitoring kinase and phosphatase activity are thus important biological tools. This review summarizes the developments of lanthanide-based luminescent peptide sensors as tools for the study of kinases and phosphatases.

    7. Fluorescent biosensors for high throughput screening of protein kinase inhibitors (pages 253–265)

      Camille Prével, Morgan Pellerano, Thi Nhu Ngoc Van and May C. Morris

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300196

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      Fluorescent biosensors constitute attractive and powerful tools for drug discovery programs, from high throughput screening (HTS) assays, to postscreen characterization of hits, optimization of lead compounds, and preclinical evaluation of candidate drugs. The authors describe the criteria which are required for successful application of fluorescent biosensors to HTS and the different types of fluorescent biosensors which have been implemented for screening, with particular focus on strategies for identification of protein kinase inhibitors.

    8. FRET-based and other fluorescent proteinase probes (pages 266–281)

      Hai-Yu Hu, Stefanie Gehrig, Gregor Reither, Devaraj Subramanian, Marcus A. Mall, Oliver Plettenburg and Carsten Schultz

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300201

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      Fluorescent probes, in particular ratiometric FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) probes, made it possible to observe enzyme activities in intact cells and living organisms. In this review, the authors summarize the various types of proteinase-sensitive fluorescent FRET probes as well as their applications. In the future, these probes will help determine disease states of patients and evaluate therapeutic effects of drugs and drug candidates.

    9. Genetically encoded reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox indicators (pages 282–293)

      Sandrine Pouvreau

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300199

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      Genetically encoded ROS (reactive oxygen species) and redox indicators are the most advanced and promising tools for real-time and compartment-specific monitoring of reactive oxygen species and thiol redox state in living cells and tissue. In this review, the author discusses the most relevant characteristics for cell biologists of the main GERRI (genetically encoded ROS and redox indicator), and how these characteristics can affect experimental outcomes.

  8. Technical Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Technical Report
    10. Research Article
    1. Time-resolved microfluorimetry: An alternative method for free radical and metabolic rate detection in microalgae (pages 294–300)

      Amadine Bijoux and Anne-Cécile Ribou

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300217

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      Oxidative stress leads to an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells and can be induced by environmental factors. ROS are instable and difficult to quantify. Fluorescent 1-pyrenebutanol can enter microalgae and, under irradiation, the number of emitted photons is dependent on ROS produces by cells (more ROS, less emitted photons). The authors demonstrate that ROS production and metabolic activity in algal cells are correlated to algal aging. These findings provide new insights into the production of free radicals in response to environmental stresses in unicellular green algae.

  9. Research Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Technical Report
    10. Research Article
    1. Acri-2,7-Py, a bright red-emitting DNA probe identified through screening of a distyryl dye library (pages 301–310)

      Delphine Naud-Martin, Xavier Martin-Benlloch, Florent Poyer, Florence Mahuteau-Betzer and Marie-Paule Teulade-Fichou

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300197

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      The identification of DNA sensors is still a challenge since no DNA probe possesses all the photophysical properties required for live cell imaging. In this study, authors synthesize and evaluate a distyryl dyes library on a panel of nucleic acids. This screening allowed the identification of good quadruplex ligands (KA∼106M–1) as well as a new red-emitting DNA stain Acri-2,7-Py. In living cells, the staining was not nuclear and photodamages generated through illumination induced cellular death, thus it requires further studies to confirm the interest of Acri-2,7-Py in photodynamic therapy.

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