Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 4

Special Issue: Biomolecular Technology of Proteins – BioToP

April 2014

Volume 9, Issue 4

Pages 453–585

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Commentary
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Research Articles
    12. Corrigendum
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      Cover Picture: Biotechnology Journal 4/2014

      Article first published online: 1 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201490010

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      This Special Issue on “Biomolecular Technology of Proteins – BioToP” compiles selected peer-reviewed publications of students from the BioToP PhD program at the Vienna Institute of BioTechnology (VIBT) of the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria (BOKU) and is edited by Co-Editorin-Chief Prof. Alois Jungbauer. The cover represents the interdisciplinary and international character of BioToP. Idea: Andreas Maccani, Dagmar Brugger, Stefan Hofbauer, Vaibhav Jadhav, Gerald Klanert, Daniel Kracher, Iris Krondorfer, Irene Schaffner. Image: Dagmar Brugger.

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Commentary
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Research Articles
    12. Corrigendum
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      Editorial Board: Biotechnology Journal 4/2014

      Article first published online: 1 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201490013

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Commentary
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Research Articles
    12. Corrigendum
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      Editorial: Biomolecular Technology of Proteins – BioToP (pages 453–454)

      Prof. Christian Obinger

      Article first published online: 1 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201400106

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      Current doctoral students who will be the driving force of science in the future. Christian Obinger, speaker of the BioToP Phd program “Biomolecular Technology of Proteins – BioToP”, reviews the articles in this BioToP Special issue.

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Commentary
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Research Articles
    12. Corrigendum
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      Contents: Biotechnology Journal 4/2014 (pages 455–456)

      Article first published online: 1 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201490011

  5. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Commentary
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Research Articles
    12. Corrigendum
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  6. Commentary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Commentary
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Research Articles
    12. Corrigendum
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      miRNA Expression in CHO: Nature knows best (pages 459–460)

      Jong Youn Baik and Kelvin H. Lee

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300503

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      Improvement of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for therapeutic protein production has great potential for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals. This commentary by Baik and Lee discusses the study by Klanert et al., which describes an improved tool that will allow greater control over the design of CHO cells.

  7. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Commentary
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Research Articles
    12. Corrigendum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Chlorite dismutases – a heme enzyme family for use in bioremediation and generation of molecular oxygen (pages 461–473)

      Stefan Hofbauer, Irene Schaffner, Paul G. Furtmüller and Christian Obinger

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300210

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      This review provides structural, spectroscopic, mechanistic and biochemical information about the heme enzyme chlorite dismutase, which is able to convert chlorite into chloride and molecular oxygen. It highlights the phylogenetic relation to structurally related dye-decolorizing peroxidases and discusses the biotechnological potential of these oxidoreductases in bioremediation and generation of oxygen.

  8. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Commentary
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Research Articles
    12. Corrigendum
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      Convenient microtiter plate-based, oxygen-independent activity assays for flavin-dependent oxidoreductases based on different redox dyes (pages 474–482)

      Dagmar Brugger, Iris Krondorfer, Kawah Zahma, Thomas Stoisser, Juan M. Bolivar, Bernd Nidetzky, Clemens K. Peterbauer and Dietmar Haltrich

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300336

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      Flavin-dependent enzymes are of interest for a number of biotechnological applications, including their use in biocatalysis and biosensors. Identification of useful novel flavin-dependent enzymes as well as tailoring their properties by protein engineering approaches is often hampered by the availability of suitable screening methods. Various redox dyes can be used in simple, rapid and robust screening assays for a range of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases, which can facilitate the application of engineering approaches for this class of enzymes.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Fungal secretomes enhance sugar beet pulp hydrolysis (pages 483–492)

      Daniel Kracher, Damir Oros, Wanying Yao, Marita Preims, Iva Rezic, Dietmar Haltrich, Tonci Rezic and Roland Ludwig

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300214

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      Sugar beet pulp is an abundant lignocellulosic waste of table sugar production and can be used as feedstock for second-generation bioethanol. Secretomes of three fungi were evaluated in respect to support cellulase action. An optimized secretome from the plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii efficiently hydrolyzes hemicelluloses and pectin and decreases the required amount of supplemented cellulase for sugar beet pulp hydrolysis.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The human anti-HIV antibodies 2F5, 2G12, and PG9 differ in their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation: Down-regulation of endogenous serine and cysteine proteinase activities could improve antibody production in plant-based expression platforms (pages 493–500)

      Melanie Niemer, Ulrich Mehofer, Juan Antonio Torres Acosta, Maria Verdianz, Theresa Henkel, Andreas Loos, Richard Strasser, Daniel Maresch, Thomas Rademacher, Herta Steinkellner and Lukas Mach

      Article first published online: 1 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300207

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      Monoclonal antibodies are important biopharmaceuticals. Their production in plant-based expression platforms is frequently accompanied by unwanted proteolysis. The results of this study show that antibody fragmentation in Nicotiana benthamiana is mainly caused by serine and cysteine proteinases, indicating that down-regulation of endogenous serine and cysteine proteinase activities could improve the performance of plant-based expression platforms destined for the production of biopharmaceuticals.

    4. Expression of human butyrylcholinesterase with an engineered glycosylation profile resembling the plasma-derived orthologue (pages 501–510)

      Jeannine D. Schneider, Alexandra Castilho, Laura Neumann, Friedrich Altmann, Andreas Loos, Latha Kannan, Tsafrir S. Mor and Herta Steinkellner

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300229

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      Plants are attractive hosts for the production of recombinant proteins as they are virtually free of human pathogens, provide an almost unlimited scale-up capacity and can carry out post-translational modifications similar to mammalian cells. The authors developed a method that enables Nicotiana benthamiana plants to produce biologically active, recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase – a molecule considered to be used as bioscavenger – with a glycosylation profile authentic to the serum-derived counterpart.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      In Pichia pastoris, growth rate regulates protein synthesis and secretion, mating and stress response (pages 511–525)

      Corinna Rebnegger, Alexandra B. Graf, Minoska Valli, Matthias G. Steiger, Brigitte Gasser, Michael Maurer and Diethard Mattanovich

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300334

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      Protein production in yeast is related to cellular growth rate. In this study the authors investigated the regulation of all genes in the yeast Pichia pastoris at a wide range of growth rates, and showed that genes related to protein synthesis and protein folding are upregulated with increasing growth rate, while protein degradation is downregulated. Genes related to sexual reproduction of the yeast are most active at intermediate growth rate. The authors conclude that faster growth positively affects protein secretion related to multiple cellular processes.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Pichia pastoris secretes recombinant proteins less efficiently than Chinese hamster ovary cells but allows higher space-time yields for less complex proteins (pages 526–537)

      Andreas Maccani, Nils Landes, Gerhard Stadlmayr, Daniel Maresch, Christian Leitner, Michael Maurer, Brigitte Gasser, Wolfgang Ernst, Renate Kunert and Diethard Mattanovich

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300305

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      Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are currently the workhorse of the biopharmaceutical industry, but yeasts such as Pichia pastoris are about to enter this field. To compare their capability for recombinant protein secretion, P. pastoris strains and CHO cell lines producing two model proteins of different complexity were cultivated in comparable fed batch processes. The results of this study indicate that the protein secretion machinery of P. pastoris is much less efficient and the secretion rate strongly depends on the complexity of the recombinant protein, but process efficiency of the yeast system allows higher space-time yields for less complex proteins.

  9. Technical Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Commentary
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Research Articles
    12. Corrigendum
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Endogenous microRNA clusters outperform chimeric sequence clusters in Chinese hamster ovary cells (pages 538–544)

      Gerald Klanert, Vaibhav Jadhav, Konstantina Chanoumidou, Johannes Grillari, Nicole Borth and Matthias Hackl

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300216

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      MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that can alter or control the properties of Chinese hamster ovary cells. In this article, the performances of different microRNA constructs were compared for their use as engineering tools.

  10. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Commentary
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Research Articles
    12. Corrigendum
    1. Peptide microarrays enable rapid mimotope optimization for pharmacokinetic analysis of the novel therapeutic antibody IMAB362 (pages 545–554)

      Karsten Schnatbaum, Hans-Ulrich Schmoldt, Matin Daneschdar, Laura M. Plum, Janina Jansong, Johannes Zerweck, Yvonne Kühne, Antonia Masch, Holger Wenschuh, Markus Fiedler, Özlem Türeci, Ugur Sahin and Ulf Reimer

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300456

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      Detection of therapeutic antibodies against membrane proteins for preclinical studies is challenging because the natural target is not readily available. In this study, mimotopes for the antibody IMAB362 (Claudiximab) were discovered and optimized using phage display and peptide microarrays and the best mimotope was successfully used for the peptide ELISA-based quantification of IMAB362. The described process efficiently provides mimotopes for targets which are difficult to produce or handle.

    2. Dual salt mixtures in mixed mode chromatography with an immobilized tryptophan ligand influence the removal of aggregated monoclonal antibodies (pages 555–565)

      Judith Vajda, Egbert Mueller and Eva Bahret

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300230

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      Kosmotropic salts enhance hydrophobic interactions in mixed mode chromatography and strenghten the water structure, while chaotropic salts do not allow adsorption based on hydrophobic interactions. With the tryptophan ligand, primarily ionic adsorption and secondary retention due to additional hydrophobic interactions seem favorable. Mixtures of chaotropic and kosmotropic salts can be used to fine-tune mixed mode separations, since protein hydrophobicity and the distribution of ionic and hydrophobic sites vary for individual targets.

    3. Generic chromatography-based purification strategies accelerate the development of downstream processes for biopharmaceutical proteins produced in plants (pages 566–577)

      Johannes F. Buyel and Rainer Fischer

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300548

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      Plants are well suited for the production of biopharmaceuticals, although separation from host cell proteins is necessary. The authors report screening of tobacco extracts on 13 different resins and show that capture on strong cation exchange or salt-tolerant anion exchange resins is most suitable for the initial recovery of plant-derived biopharmaceutical proteins.

    4. Reduced graphene oxide hydrogels and xerogels provide efficient platforms for immobilization and laccase production by Trametes pubescens (pages 578–584)

      Susana Rodriguez-Couto, Alejandro Arzac, Gracia Patricia Leal and Radmila Tomovska

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300474

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      The properties of graphene make it an interesting material for use in fungal immobilization for various bioprocesses. In this article, the authors describe the creation of hydrogels and xerogels from graphene, and show that these structures are suitable supports for the immobilization and laccase production of Trametes pubescens. These results pave the way for the development of graphene-based supports for the immobilization of microorganisms.

  11. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Commentary
    8. Review
    9. Research Articles
    10. Technical Report
    11. Research Articles
    12. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content

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