Biotechnology Journal

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 7

Special Issue: Stem cells and regenerative medicine

July 2014

Volume 9, Issue 7

Pages 863–989

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Mini-Review
    10. Research Articles
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      Cover Picture: Biotechnology Journal 7/2014

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201490022

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      Special Issue: Stem cells and regenerative issue. This is the second special issue of Biotechnology Journal in collaboration with the Asian Federation of Biotechnology and is edited by Prof. Byung-Soo Kim and Prof. Jiandong Ding. The cover shows a fluorescence image of a rat eye tissue section. Transplanted neural stem cells expressing GFP (green) have integrated into the host retina. Light-detecting photoreceptors (rods and cones) of the host eye are stained red and all cell nuclei are stained blue. The image is from the article by Jisun Oh et al.10.1002/biot.201400019.

  2. Editorial Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Mini-Review
    10. Research Articles
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      Editorial Board: Biotechnology Journal 7/2014

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201490024

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Mini-Review
    10. Research Articles
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      Editorial: Scientific and engineering progress in stem cell and regenerative medicine research (pages 863–864)

      Byung-Soo Kim and Jiandong Ding

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201400336

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      Over the past decade, stem cell and regenerative medicine has emerged as a very important field in natural sciences and medicine. We have witnessed remarkable progress in this thriving field, as demonstrated by the research articles and reviews in this AFOB Special Issue.

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Mini-Review
    10. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. BiotecVisions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Mini-Review
    10. Research Articles
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      BiotecVisions 2014, July

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300533

  6. Forum

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Mini-Review
    10. Research Articles
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  7. Reviews

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
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    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Mini-Review
    10. Research Articles
    1. Induced pluripotent stem cells for modeling of pediatric neurological disorders (pages 871–891)

      Jiho Jang, Zhejiu Quan, Yunjin J. Yum, Hyo Sook Song, Seonyeol Paek and Hoon-Chul Kang

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201400010

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      Many neurological disorders have proven difficult to study and treat due to the lack of suitable disease models. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology is an important recent advance in pediatric neurological disease research. In this review, an overview of the current iPSC technology is provided, with discussion of the importance of these cells in early-onset neurological disease modeling, pathophysiological investigations, drug development and cell replacement therapy.

    2. Stem cell therapy and cellular engineering for treatment of neuronal dysfunction in Huntington's disease (pages 882–894)

      Kyung-Ah Choi, Insik Hwang, Hang-soo Park, Seung-Ick Oh, Seongman Kang and Sunghoi Hong

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300560

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      Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by expanded CAG trinucleotide repeats in the huntingtin gene. Reprogramming technology has been used to convert HD patient fibroblasts into pluripotent or multipotent stem cells, which can be differentiated into striatal medium spiny neurons in vitro. In this article, the authors describe the current understanding of pathological mechanisms in HD and suggest alternative stem cell sources that could be used in HD therapies in the near future.

    3. Preserving human cells for regenerative, reproductive, and transfusion medicine (pages 895–903)

      Waseem Asghar, Rami El Assal , Hadi Shafiee, Raymond M. Anchan and Utkan Demirci

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300074

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      Cell cryopreservation is a process commonly used to maintain cellular life at sub-zero temperatures, but current cell cryopreservation methods can damage cells due to ice crystal formation and toxicity of the cryoprotective agents (CPAs). Vitrification has emerged as an alternative cryopreservation technique to preserve cells without ice crystal formation. In this review, the advantages and challenges associated with the current cell cryopreservation methods are discussed and future directions are highlighted.

    4. Cell sheet engineering for regenerative medicine: Current challenges and strategies (pages 904–914)

      Toshiyuki Owaki, Tatsuya Shimizu, Masayuki Yamato and Teruo Okano

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300432

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      Cell sheet engineering is a novel method of tissue engineering without a scaffold that has demonstrated successful outcomes in several clinical studies. However, important infrastructure improvements are needed for the full utilization of this technique in regenerative medicine. This review describes the challenges that remain to be faced and the new technologies that need to be developed in order to achieve mass production of high quality cell sheets to supply cell sheet-based clinical applications.

  8. Mini-Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Mini-Review
    10. Research Articles
    1. Antibody approaches to prepare clinically transplantable cells from human embryonic stem cells: Identification of human embryonic stem cell surface markers by monoclonal antibodies (pages 915–920)

      Hong Seo Choi, Won-Tae Kim and Chun Jeih Ryu

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300495

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      Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are induced to differentiate in vitro to prepare clinically useful somatic cell types. hESC-specific antibodies, developed by whole-cell immunization and decoy immunization strategies, are able to specifically eliminate residual undifferentiated hESCs without harming differentiated somatic cells, thus preventing the formation of teratomas.

  9. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial Board
    4. Editorial
    5. Contents
    6. BiotecVisions
    7. Forum
    8. Reviews
    9. Mini-Review
    10. Research Articles
    1. Multipotent adult hippocampal progenitor cells maintained as neurospheres favor differentiation toward glial lineages (pages 921–933)

      Jisun Oh, Gabrielle J. Daniels, Lawrence S. Chiou, Eun-Ah Ye, Yong-Seob Jeong and Donald S. Sakaguchi

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201400019

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      An understanding of the molecular and cellular properties of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is of great interest, as these cells could potentially be used in cell-based therapies for CNS repair. Studies undertaken in this manuscript indicate that adult rat hippocampal progenitor cells (AHPCs) grown as neurospheres differentiate along a glial lineage and display greater migrational activity than AHPCs grown using the conventional adherent system, while both populations survive and integrate into the host CNS following retinal transplantation. These results suggest that the culture configuration during maintenance of NPCs influences cell fate and motility in vitro and in vivo.

    2. Biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles induce neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells via modulation of reactive oxygen species, phosphatases, and kinase signaling pathways (pages 934–943)

      Ahmed Abdal Dayem, BongWoo Kim, Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Hye Yeon Choi, Gwangmo Yang, Subbroto Kumar Saha, Dawoon Han, Jihae Han, Kyeongseok Kim, Jin-Hoi Kim and Ssang-Goo Cho

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300555

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      Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells Sare an important in vitro models for neuroscience research. In this article, the authors use treatment with silver nanoparticles to modulate intracellular signaling pathways, inducing neuronal differentiation of human SH-SY5Y cells. This research indicates that silver nanoparticles may be a promising nanomaterial for stem cell research and therapy.

    3. Biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles induce neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells via modulation of reactive oxygen species, phosphatases, and kinase signaling pathways (pages 934–943)

      Ahmed Abdal Dayem, BongWoo Kim, Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Hye Yeon Choi, Gwangmo Yang, Subbroto Kumar Saha, Dawoon Han, Jihae Han, Kyeongseok Kim, Jin-Hoi Kim and Ssang-Goo Cho

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201400555

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      Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells Sare an important in vitro models for neuroscience research. In this article, the authors use treatment with silver nanoparticles to modulate intracellular signaling pathways, inducing neuronal differentiation of human SH-SY5Y cells. This research indicates that silver nanoparticles may be a promising nanomaterial for stem cell research and therapy.

    4. Angiogenic/osteogenic response of BMMSCs on bone-derived scaffold: Effect of hypoxia and role of PI3K/Akt-mediated VEGF-VEGFR pathway (pages 944–953)

      Yi Zhou, Xiaoxu Guan, Mengfei Yu, Xinhua Wang, Wenyuan Zhu, Chaowei Wang, Mengliu Yu and Huiming Wang

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300310

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      To produce functional tissue-engineered bone, replicating the in vivo microenvironment is an effective method. The combination of natural bone-derived scaffolds and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSCs) that are subjected to hypoxia could promote an osteogenic response of BMMSCs seeded in scaffolds, while simultaneously inducing angiogenic responses in the constructs. The data indicate that the production of bionics-based, tissue-engineered bone will be a promising approach for the repair of orthopedic bone defects in clinical settings.

    5. S-Fms signalobody enhances myeloid cell growth and migration (pages 954–961)

      Masahiro Kawahara, Azusa Hitomi and Teruyuki Nagamune

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300346

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      As receptor tyrosine kinases control cell fates in many cell types, mimicry of kinase functions is promising for artificial control of cell fates. This study demonstrates that the scFv-c-Fms fusion protein, named S-Fms signalobody, transduces specific antigen-dependent growth and directional migration signals in myeloid progenitor FDC-P1 cells. This approach may be extended to production of practically relevant blood cells as well as artificial control of cell migration for tissue regeneration and induction of immune responses.

    6. A serum-free medium developed for in vitro expansion of murine intestinal stem cells (pages 962–970)

      Mahmoud S. Mohamed, Yun Chen and Chao-Ling Yao

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201400016

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      Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) offer potential treatments for intestinal diseases. Thus, the development of a serum-free medium for ISC expansion to solve the issue of insufficient ISC numbers is important for basic research and clinical applications. In this study, the authors describe the development of a serum-free medium for long-term ISC expansion in vitro, which may be applied in basic research and in the clinic.

    7. Detachably assembled microfluidic device for perfusion culture and post-culture analysis of a spheroid array (pages 971–979)

      Yusuke Sakai, Koji Hattori, Fumiki Yanagawa, Shinji Sugiura, Toshiyuki Kanamori and Kohji Nakazawa

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300559

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      Microfluidic cell culture devices allow for perfusion culture of three-dimensional (3D) tissue, which mimics the flow of blood in vascularized 3D tissue. In this study, the authors report a detachably assembled microfluidic device, which enables the perfusion culture of spheroids and detailed post-culture analysis. HepG2 spheroids exhibit greater cell growth at higher perfusion flow rates than at lower perfusion flow rates, and exhibit different metabolic activity and mRNA and protein expression under the different flow rate conditions.

    8. The hollow fiber bioreactor as a stroma-supported, serum-free ex vivo expansion platform for human umbilical cord blood cells (pages 980–989)

      Cao Xue, Kenneth Y. C. Kwek, Jerry K. Y. Chan, Qingfeng Chen and Mayasari Lim

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/biot.201300320

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      Large-scale ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors has significant clinical implications. In this manuscript, cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells were expanded in a stroma-supported hollow fiber bioreactor, which provided high surface area and cell-cell contact to the expansion culture. Successful expansion and separation of hematopoietic cells was achieved using this approach, with performance comparable to standard flask expansion.

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