Structure of silk by raman spectromicroscopy: From the spinning glands to the fibers

Authors

  • Thierry Lefèvre,

    Corresponding author
    1. Département de Chimie – Centre de recherche sur les matériaux avancés (CERMA) – Centre québécois sur les matériaux fonctionnels (CQMF), Université Laval, Pavillon Alexandre-Vachon, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
    • Département de Chimie – Centre de recherche sur les matériaux avancés (CERMA) – Centre québécois sur les matériaux fonctionnels (CQMF), Université Laval, Pavillon Alexandre-Vachon, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
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  • François Paquet-Mercier,

    1. Département de Chimie – Centre de recherche sur les matériaux avancés (CERMA) – Centre québécois sur les matériaux fonctionnels (CQMF), Université Laval, Pavillon Alexandre-Vachon, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
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  • Jean-François Rioux-Dubé,

    1. Département de Chimie – Centre de recherche sur les matériaux avancés (CERMA) – Centre québécois sur les matériaux fonctionnels (CQMF), Université Laval, Pavillon Alexandre-Vachon, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
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  • Michel Pézolet

    1. Département de Chimie – Centre de recherche sur les matériaux avancés (CERMA) – Centre québécois sur les matériaux fonctionnels (CQMF), Université Laval, Pavillon Alexandre-Vachon, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
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  • This article was originally published online as an accepted preprint. The “Published Online” date corresponds to the preprint version. You can request a copy of the preprint by emailing the Biopolymers editorial office at biopolymers@wiley.com

Abstract

Raman spectroscopy has long been proved to be a useful tool to study the conformation of protein-based materials such as silk. Thanks to recent developments, linearly polarized Raman spectromicroscopy has appeared very efficient to characterize the molecular structure of native single silk fibers and spinning dopes because it can provide information relative to the protein secondary structure, molecular orientation, and amino acid composition. This review will describe recent advances in the study of the structure of silk by Raman spectromicroscopy. A particular emphasis is put on the spider dragline and silkworm cocoon threads, other fibers spun by orb-weaving spiders, the spinning dope contained in their silk glands and the effect of mechanical deformation. Taken together, the results of the literature show that Raman spectromicroscopy is particularly efficient to investigate all aspects of silk structure and production. The data provided can lead to a better understanding of the structure of the silk dope, transformations occurring during the spinning process, and structure and mechanical properties of native fibers. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 97: 322–336, 2012.

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