Polymer surfaces derivatized with poly(vinyl-N-hexylpyridinium) kill airborne and waterborne bacteria

Authors

  • Joerg C. Tiller,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139; telephone: 617-253-3556; fax: 617-252-1609
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  • Sang Beom Lee,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139; telephone: 617-253-3556; fax: 617-252-1609
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  • Kim Lewis,

    1. Department of Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115
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  • Alexander M. Klibanov

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139; telephone: 617-253-3556; fax: 617-252-1609
    • Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139; telephone: 617-253-3556; fax: 617-252-1609
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Abstract

A facile methodology has been developed for covalently derivatizing the surfaces of common materials with a designed antibacterial polycation, poly(vinyl-N-pyridinium bromide), wherein the first, key step involves surface coating with a nanolayer of silica. Various commercial synthetic polymers derivatized in this manner become bactericidal—they kill up to 99% of deposited, from either an aerosol or an aqueous suspension, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on contact. © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 79: 465–471, 2002.

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